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What’s so special about John Moses Browning?
WeaponsMan ^

Posted on 10/17/2013 1:05:37 PM PDT by virgil283

"Browning was not a degreed engineer, but he is, to date, the greatest firearms designer who has ever lived. Consider this: had Browning done nothing but the 1911, he’d have a place in the top rank of gun designers, ever. But that’s not all he did, by any means. If he had done nothing but the M1917 and M1919 machine guns, he’d have a place in the top ranks of designers. If he’d done nothing but the M2HB, a gun which will still be in widespread infantry service a century after its introduction, and its .50 siblings, he’d be hailed as a genius. One runs out of superlatives describing Browning’s career, with at least 80 firearms designed, almost 150 patents granted, and literally three-quarters of US sporting arms production in the year 1900 being Browning designs – before his successes with automatic guns.......[ read it all - its very well writen]

(Excerpt) Read more at weaponsman.com ...


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: banglist; browning; johnmosesbrowning
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Amazing so little is written about this mechanical genius

.....Jonathan Browning Cylinder Repeater. Image from a great article on Jonathan Browning by William C. Montgomery;

1 posted on 10/17/2013 1:05:37 PM PDT by virgil283
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To: virgil283

John Moses Browning - the patron saint of freedom, and self defense. Many great miracles have been worked in his name.


2 posted on 10/17/2013 1:11:16 PM PDT by Little Ray (How did I end up in this hand-basket, and why is it getting so hot?)
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To: virgil283

If traveling in the Salt Lake, Utah area take the time to drive north to Ogden, UT. The awesome Railroad and Browning Museum is located in the downtown area at the Railroad Station. The items in this outstanding museum are a sight to see.


3 posted on 10/17/2013 1:21:57 PM PDT by TaMoDee (Go Pack Go!)
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To: virgil283
Browning was not a degreed engineer

Big deal...Thomas Edison was almost completely self-educated.

4 posted on 10/17/2013 1:24:34 PM PDT by RoosterRedux (The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing -- Socrates)
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To: RoosterRedux

Browning was not a degreed engineer

Big deal...Thomas Edison was almost completely
self-educated.

The big deal is Browning did his own design work and was famous for coming up with and improving his own ideas.


5 posted on 10/17/2013 1:28:05 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: virgil283
Browning was a mechanical genius and a shrewd marketer of his products. Some of his legendary firearms are: 1) M1911 .45 pistol; 2) P35 9mm Hi-Power; 3) M1918 .30 Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR); 4) M1917 and M1919 .30 machine guns; 5) M2 and M3 .50 machine guns; 6) Winchester 1892, 1894, 1895 lever action rifles; 7) Browning Auto 5 shotgun; 8) Browning M1895 .30 machine gun (aka “potato digger”); 9) Winchester M1897 and M1912 12 ga. pump shotguns.

Winchester and Colt manufactured Browning's designs. Browning established a strong working relationship with Fabrique Nationale in Herstal, Belgium. Browning designs were marketed in Europe, Asia, and South America under the FN logo and in North America under the Browning logo. Browning passes away in Herstal, Belgium, in 1926 while working on his last great pistol — the P35 Hi-Power.

6 posted on 10/17/2013 1:38:31 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: virgil283

That was his daddy’s rifle design. John Moses was good, but making that rifle at 3 years old might have been out of even his reach.

I went to the museum in Ogden once. There were some very old museum volunteer ladies watching the place. Way in the back was a WWI display with a 1917 and other goodies and a velvet rope in front of it. Shortly after I was there, someone walked in, leaned over, and plucked that fully operational belt fed machine gun off the display and walked out. I hope they upped their security after that.


7 posted on 10/17/2013 1:43:41 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: Mastador1
Not meaning to insult Browning but did mean to point out the silly notion that a degree should be important to an inventor.
8 posted on 10/17/2013 1:45:59 PM PDT by RoosterRedux (The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing -- Socrates)
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To: virgil283
The man did this far before the modern time of various CAD tools. It takes a type of mechanical genius to intuit the intricate interaction of parts with no more than his brain and paper to design with.

Materials science had to be fairly rudimentary back then as well, but Browning designs are not known for blowing up.

I am proud to own three of his designs, two of them antiques by now.

9 posted on 10/17/2013 1:46:18 PM PDT by doorgunner69
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To: virgil283

Great short article on the genius!


10 posted on 10/17/2013 1:48:42 PM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: virgil283

I read a biography of him once. My favorite story was when he was a Mormon missionary in Georgia, I think. Back then they lived off the charity of others and sometimes there wasn’t much charity so he and his partner were looking pretty shabby. In a store window they saw a new Winchester that he had designed and sold before he went on his mission. He hadn’t seen the finished product so he asked the store owner if he could look at it. No. Get out of here, you bums.


11 posted on 10/17/2013 1:53:36 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: RoosterRedux

Not meaning to insult Browning but did mean to point out the silly notion that a degree should be important to an inventor.

On that we can agree, many great inventors did not have degrees, just look at Tesla. No degrees and arguably one of the greatest inventors ever.


12 posted on 10/17/2013 1:54:27 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: Little Ray
John Moses Browning - the patron saint of freedom, and self defense.

Obama's socialist enablers will invent a reason to denigrate his record of accomplishments.

The socialist agenda calls for discrediting America's founders and the founding documents, the founders religious, America’s leaders, America’s statesmen, and most of all, the Republican form of government guaranteed by the Constitution.

A Democracy is Obama’s objective because laws can be ignored when the majority rules. In a Democracy, the majority also has the power to enforce laws than don’t exist.

13 posted on 10/17/2013 2:02:43 PM PDT by MosesKnows (Love many, trust few, and always paddle your own canoe.)
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To: virgil283

The Gospel According to John Moses Browming

http://www.frfrogspad.com/jmb.htm


14 posted on 10/17/2013 2:06:13 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: virgil283

Y’all best just bend one knee, and thank your lucky stars, when you mention THE NAME THAT SHOULD BE NAMED MUCH!

Aside from machine guns, heavy autonmatic rifles, and shotguns, where y’all think that most American icon, the G.I. 1911 .45ACP semiautomatic pistol, came from?

Where do you think the ‘other most used military semiautomatic pistol’, the Browning/FN Hi-Power (P35), got it’s start?

Through the writings of the late and great Stephen A. Camp, BHP guru, I own two of these beauties.

I used to shoot Junior NRA on Cape Cod/Otis AFB, in the 1960’s, shooting the 1911. Now, the recoil is just that, too much, so I dialed down to 9mm Parabellum, and the Browning Hi Power.


15 posted on 10/17/2013 2:08:50 PM PDT by Terry L Smith
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To: MasterGunner01

Browning was indeed a genius.


16 posted on 10/17/2013 2:08:54 PM PDT by backwoods-engineer (Blog: www.BackwoodsEngineer.com)
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To: MasterGunner01
You left out a few - the Model 1885 falling block rifle, the 1900 Browning automatic pistol, the 1886 Winchester, the Browning Superposed shotgun, the Ithaca Model 37 pump shotgun, the Remington Model 8 semiauto rifle, the Browning 20mm cannon, and of course, his favorite - the .22 semiautomatic rifle.

I'm sure that there are many, many more.

17 posted on 10/17/2013 2:26:10 PM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: virgil283
John Browning gave us the most powerful, most iconic, most feared machine gun (feared by our enemies that is) the world has veer seen, The M2 .05 Browning Heavy caliber Machine Gun, "Ma Deuce''.
18 posted on 10/17/2013 2:27:02 PM PDT by jmacusa (I don't think so, but I doubt it.)
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To: virgil283
Great read, thanks! JMB is one of my heroes. IIRC in an old issue of the Gun Digest, it was related that JMB built a .22 RF rifle that consisted of three parts total. I'm an old service engineer but can't get my lobes around that one, even to save my ass! ;)
19 posted on 10/17/2013 2:29:44 PM PDT by W.
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To: Chainmail

One not mentioned is one of my antiques: the Baby Browning. A nasty little thing in .25 ACP. I do not like shooting the thing, but it was a gift to my wife from her father and she cannot shoot it.


20 posted on 10/17/2013 2:50:56 PM PDT by doorgunner69
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To: Chainmail
Quite right. The list of Browning's designs surpasses both our lists! A couple more examples: his M1903 and M1805 pistols were very popular and there were many more successes.

The biggest gun that Browning designed was the M4 (later M9) 37mm cannon. The M4 and M9 were installed on P-39 fighters ans the M9 on WW2 PT boats.

21 posted on 10/17/2013 2:54:34 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: eartrumpet

Browning demonstrated the M-1917 belt fed machine gun to the Army. Linking belt after belt, he fed ammunition to it, and it fired, and fired. He topped of the water jacket in between attaching belts. Eventually after 45 minutes of continuous fire, he had exhausted all the ammunition. No stoppages. Nicht, Zero, Nada.

He then pulled out a handkerchief and tied a blindfold over his eyes. He disassembled the gun blindfolded, putting each part on a table in front of the assembled officers, down to the last part. He then reassembed it blind folded and performed a function check. It is important for soldiers to be able to perform maintenance on machine guns in the dark, without lights.

He did it again a few months later, because some of the officers thought it might be a trick.


22 posted on 10/17/2013 3:16:50 PM PDT by donmeaker (The lessons of Weimar are soon to be relearned.)
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To: W.

The Remington Rolling Block was offered from .22 up to 11.43mm. In 1898 in Cuba, there were a lot of them around.


23 posted on 10/17/2013 3:18:45 PM PDT by donmeaker (The lessons of Weimar are soon to be relearned.)
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To: MasterGunner01

Oops, a couple of typos. Should read “M1905” vice “M1805” pistols. Should be “and” vice “ans”. Blasted fumble fingers!


24 posted on 10/17/2013 3:19:36 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: Chainmail

If you look at the safety lever on the Kalashnikov, you will see an heir to the Auto 5.


25 posted on 10/17/2013 3:19:44 PM PDT by donmeaker (The lessons of Weimar are soon to be relearned.)
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To: Mastador1

No arguing about it. Tesla is, was, and perhaps may always be the greatest human being inventor ever.

They STILL don’t understand some of the things he came up with in 1899.


26 posted on 10/17/2013 3:22:49 PM PDT by RinaseaofDs
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To: RinaseaofDs

No arguing about it. Tesla is, was, and perhaps may always be the greatest human being inventor ever.

They STILL don’t understand some of the things he came up with in 1899.

They are still hiding some of the things he came up with.


27 posted on 10/17/2013 3:25:54 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: virgil283
Bttt.

5.56mm

28 posted on 10/17/2013 3:31:35 PM PDT by M Kehoe
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To: MasterGunner01
Wife has a nice vintage nickel 1908 Hammerless in .380 ACP. I gather Capone and others like him carred the gun because it was a precursor to todays "dehorned" carry guns and sat well in a coat pocket. It is very sleek.

It is a nightmare to tear down completely. No idea how he designed such an intricate mechanism back then. Hardest gun to assemble I ever came across. Beautifully fitted though.

29 posted on 10/17/2013 3:40:26 PM PDT by doorgunner69
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To: donmeaker

That amazing “M-1917 blindfolded field stripping and reassembly” trick was also important for Marines, especially GySgt. John Basilone, on Guadalcanal, October 24 - 24, 1942. Seventh Marines, First Division. His Congressional Medal of Honor citation actually read “. . . contributed in large measure to the virtual annihilation of a Japanese regiment.” Those guys ran out of water, though, and so they refilled the water jackets of their guns with urine.


30 posted on 10/17/2013 3:49:26 PM PDT by Unknowing (Now is the time for all smart little girls to come to the aid of their country.)
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To: donmeaker
The first fully automatic machine gun was invented by Hiram Stevens Maxim in 1884. Unable to interest the US Army in the gun, Maxim marketed it in Europe. The Maxim or its variant made by Vickers was adopted by many of the major powers that fought in WW I: Great Britain as the Vickers-Maxim; Germany as the Spandau (after the arsenal); Russia as the Maxim. Eventually the US Army got around to purchase the gun (about 300+) from Vickers as the M1916 .30 Heavy Machine Gun. The later Browning .30 M1917 machine gun was far superior to the M1916 Vickers.

There is a funny story about Maxim and his gun in Russia. Maxim arrived in Russia with his gun to demonstrate to to a bunch of Czarist officers. While he was awaiting the demonstration date and his gun and belted ammunition to arrive at the site, he was shadowed by the Czar's secret police, the Okhrana.

When the demonstration day came, Maxim explained the operation of his gun to the Czar's officers who had no idea what an automatic machine gun was. These officers’ only exposure had been to the manually cranked Gatling (called Gorloff by the Russians). When Maxim explained about the cocking handle and how it cycled with the gun, one officer said he'd like to see a soldier move the handle at 660 rounds per minute!

Maxim inserted a belt, cocked the gun twice to index the belt and chamber a round. He then pushed the trigger bar and fired the whole belt of 300 rounds without touching the cocking handle — that continued flipping back and forth as the gun fired.

The Russian officers were absolutely dumbfounded by what they had witnessed. The recommendation was the Maxim be adopted in numbers for the Russian Army. The Maxim soldiered with the Russian Army from 1910 and into the 1950s before it was replaced by lighter and newer designs.

31 posted on 10/17/2013 3:50:38 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: doorgunner69
I think there's one pistol that gives your Browning 1908 Hammerless a run for its money in the hard to disassemble and reassemble department: the Ruger Mk I (and subsequent) .22LR pistols. The Rugers are very popular with sportsmen and target shooters, but the gun is a major PITA when it comes to cleaning and maintenance. The best .22LR auto pistol is the High Standard, IHMO. It's easy to clean and maintain, Plus, it has quick change barrel that goes on or off with the push of a button..
32 posted on 10/17/2013 4:01:36 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: MasterGunner01

Don’t forget that his (Maxim’s) son had patents on some of the first suppressors.


33 posted on 10/17/2013 4:02:29 PM PDT by Antihero101607
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To: donmeaker

That’s a good design. The hammer locks the breech block just before firing. Easy, yet effective!


34 posted on 10/17/2013 4:17:44 PM PDT by W.
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To: MasterGunner01
Normal field stripping of the 1908 is easy. Uses the old rotate the barrel to unlock method.

Her gun had sat in her mother's drawer for decades and had to be completely disassembled for cleaning out the gunk. Getting sear springs and sears back together was insanely difficult.

A friend had a Mk1 but maybe never stripped it, never mentioned anything about it. But then, he was not a gun guy and maybe never was into cleaning things.

35 posted on 10/17/2013 4:23:24 PM PDT by doorgunner69
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To: eartrumpet
I read a biography of him once. My favorite story was when he was a Mormon missionary in Georgia, I think. Back then they lived off the charity of others and sometimes there wasn’t much charity so he and his partner were looking pretty shabby. In a store window they saw a new Winchester that he had designed and sold before he went on his mission. He hadn’t seen the finished product so he asked the store owner if he could look at it. No. Get out of here, you bums.

I read a different version of that story. I believe the rifle was the "High Wall" model, his first successful design. Browning and his brothers had made and sold a few in Utah before selling the design to Winchester. Anyhow, Browning convinced the store owner to let him examine the rifle. The store owner reluctantly agreed. After a few minutes of handling, the store owner commented that Browning seemed knowledgeable about the rifle. Browning replied, "I should be, I designed it". Then the store owner snatched away the rifle and showed who he believed to be a smartass kid the door.

36 posted on 10/17/2013 4:25:26 PM PDT by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: virgil283
I love my matched set 12ga and 20ga.

FMCDH(BITS)

37 posted on 10/17/2013 4:27:25 PM PDT by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
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To: Antihero101607
Believe it or not, the cylindrical mufflers on most two-cycle and four-cycle gasoline engine lawn mowers are actually taken from the Maxim sound suppressor (silencer) designs. Maxim's suppressors were very efficient.
38 posted on 10/17/2013 4:29:06 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: MasterGunner01

Ahh, the PITA is getting that hammer strut where it belongs after you wiggle and twist the bolt stop/mainspring housing into place. Always a good time, I had to do it over the phone to my boss. Blargh...


39 posted on 10/17/2013 4:29:09 PM PDT by W.
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To: W.
One of the most impressive weapons turned out by John Moses, was the BAR.Lots of fire power, deadly, portable.
40 posted on 10/17/2013 4:33:48 PM PDT by BooBoo1000 (The lessons of Wiemar are soon to be relearned,)
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To: MasterGunner01

Fascinating.


41 posted on 10/17/2013 4:49:34 PM PDT by Antihero101607
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To: virgil283

Browning ping


42 posted on 10/17/2013 5:06:10 PM PDT by TNoldman (AN AMERICAN FOR A MUSLIM/BHO FREE AMERICA.)
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To: TexasRepublic

That’s the story. I wish I could find that book again, it’s been years since I read it.

I liked the author’s description of the mountain outside Ogden where he test fired everything. The mountain put up with it all until he made the 37mm, then the mountain gave up and large parts started sliding downhill.


43 posted on 10/17/2013 5:40:34 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: virgil283

Johnathan was John Brownings father... also a fine gunsmith... you can visit his home/museum in Navou , Ill.


44 posted on 10/17/2013 6:00:44 PM PDT by Neidermeyer (I used to be disgusted , now I try to be amused.)
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To: RoosterRedux

Just how many non-degreed or degreed people today would be able create the many designs or products?


45 posted on 10/17/2013 7:25:44 PM PDT by Doc91678 (Doc91678)
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To: virgil283

John Moses Browning was a god and a patriot. I’m proud to say that at one time, back before a tragic boating accident, I owned several of his designs.

High quality and beautiful in their simplicity and reliability.

Lady Liberty owes a lot to JMB.


46 posted on 10/17/2013 7:39:36 PM PDT by AFreeBird
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To: jmacusa

Happiness is a belt fed weapon. Especially if it was designed by Mr. Browning.


47 posted on 10/17/2013 7:46:16 PM PDT by AFreeBird
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To: eartrumpet

I don’t think so, my Great Uncle was Mission President in that area and I see no mention of this in our family lore.


48 posted on 10/17/2013 7:54:07 PM PDT by Little Bill (A)
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To: Little Bill; TexasRepublic

See post 36 for independent verification of the story.


49 posted on 10/17/2013 8:19:27 PM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: AFreeBird

Yeah man. Bombs can be ‘’smart’’ but ‘’Ma Deuce’’ just need to tap you once and it’s game over.


50 posted on 10/17/2013 8:36:12 PM PDT by jmacusa (I don't think so, but I doubt it.)
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