Free Republic
Browse · Search
Smoky Backroom
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Law Enforcement: This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories
http://stopthedrugwar.org/ ^ | 3 13 06 | stopthedrugwar.org

Posted on 03/13/2006 12:54:46 PM PST by freepatriot32

We've got something for everybody this week: Cops as gangsters, DEA agents as thieving real estate speculators, a Texas police chief who never let any drug evidence get away, cops in Miami and Chicago planting drugs, evidence gone missing in East St. Louis, and, of course, another greedy prison guard, this time in Georgia. Let's get to it:

In Los Angeles, at least 19 people, including five police officers have been charged with belonging to a ring led by LAPD Officer Ruben Palomares that committed armed robberies disguised as drug raids. Thirteen had been previously charged in the case, but six more were indicted last week, including a former LA County Sheriff's deputy, and LAPD officer, and a Long Beach police officer, the Associated Press reported. They face multiple counts of conspiracy to possess drugs with the intent to distribute, use of a firearm in a drug trafficking crime, and deprivation of rights under color of law. Palomares allegedly supplied his gang with uniforms, radios, and badges, and the group sometimes used LAPD patrol cars to drive to drug houses they had previously targeted. Their victims were allegedly restrained, threatened, beaten, and robbed. The gang made off with at least 600 pounds of weed, TVs, jewelry, cash, and weapons. Palomares is currently serving a 15-year sentence for his role as gang leader.

In Atlanta, a federal grand jury indicted a DEA agent Monday for stealing DEA funds to buy real estate while he worked Atlanta's Hartsfield airport, WXIA TV reported. Agent Gregory Campion, 44, is charged with embezzling money as a federal officer, embezzling public funds, and money laundering. According to the indictment, on at least seven occasions Campion stole money seized during drug busts from a secure storage vault and used it to buy properties in Orlando, where he currently lives. Prosecutors are seeking to seize those properties. The DEA has suspended Campion without pay.

In Troup, Texas, the police chief and a police officer were arrested last Friday after a six-week investigation into missing drugs and other evidence, the Dallas Morning News reported. Police Chief Chester Kennedy is charged with evidence tampering and Officer Mark Turner is charged with evidence tampering and delivery of marijuana. The investigation by the Smith County Sheriff's Department and the FBI came about after the sheriff received complaints from both inside and outside the department that Troup police had not sent any drug evidence to be tested in five years. They zeroed in on four cases where people were arrested, but the drugs disappeared, including an eight-ball of methamphetamine, several plants, and a gallon bag filled with weed. Kennedy has admitted that he knew evidence had gone missing and that he had given some seized bootleg alcohol to an officer. Turner sold a small quantity of pot to an undercover agent, and police found more in his home later.

In Miami, former Miami Police Officer Torrance Gary was arrested March 2 on charges he planted drugs at the scene of an arrest, local TV News 10 reported. Gary had claimed to see a man trying to flush heroin down a toilet during a drug bust, but it later became clear he could not have seen what he claimed from his vantage point, investigators said. They also said that although heroin was discovered in the bathroom, the man did not put it there. Gary, a 15-year veteran before he resigned two weeks earlier, is out on a $10,000 bond.

In Chicago, the Sun Times reports that Police Sgt. Kevin Morrison has been fired for misconduct in a 2001 drug case. When a teacher complained that she was arrested after her ex-husband had drugs planted in her car, Morrison "failed to cooperate" in the investigation, the Police Board found. Andrea Sullivan was arrested outside her school after Morrison, acting on a tip, pulled her over and found 250 Ecstasy tablets and 43 grams of cocaine. She immediately accused her ex-husband, William Sullivan, of planting the drugs. Morrison was cited for refusing to identify the informant he said gave him the tip drugs were in the car, although his cell phone records showed he had received a call from William Sullivan's brother Stuart. Prosecutors dropped the charges against Andrea Sullivan a month later and said they didn't have enough evidence to charge anyone with planting the drugs. Of the board's eight members, five voted to fire him, two said he deserved lesser punishment, and one found him not guilty on the departmental administrative charges. Bizarrely, Andrea Sullivan has remarried, and her new husband, Chicago Police Officer Michael Allegretti faces criminal charges he ordered women to expose themselves to avoid traffic tickets.

In East St. Louis, Illinois, somebody ripped-off an unknown amount of guns and drugs from the police evidence vault, and the mayor thinks it was an inside job. No one is sure yet exactly what is gone, and Police Chief James Mister said it will take until the end of the month to figure it out, the Associated Press reported Tuesday. (Former Police Chief Ronald Masters will be sentenced March 20 after being convicted of obstructing federal agents investigating a felon illegally carrying a gun as an auxiliary police officer.) Mayor Carl Officer told the Belleville News-Democrat Monday the theft was an inside job and called it "an attempt to cover up and divert some ongoing investigations into police corruption."

In Griffin, Georgia, Spalding County Deputy John Dabbs was busted March 2 on charges he was selling marijuana to inmates at the Spaulding County Jail. The night-shift guard fell prey to an undercover officer planted in a cell block, WSB TV in Atlanta reported. Dabbs went down after being caught discussing the transfer of cash for narcotics, the Spalding County Sheriff's Office told the station.

-- END --


TOPICS: Heated Discussion
KEYWORDS: banglist; cops; corrupt; corruptcops; donutwatch; enforcement; govwatch; jackbootedthugs; jbt; law; leo; libertarians; stories; this; weeks; wodlist
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-71 next last

1 posted on 03/13/2006 12:54:51 PM PST by freepatriot32
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: albertp; Allosaurs_r_us; Abram; AlexandriaDuke; Americanwolf; Annie03; Baby Bear; bassmaner; ...
Libertarian ping.To be added or removed from my ping list freepmail me or post a message here
2 posted on 03/13/2006 12:55:22 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie; robertpaulsen; Mojave

ping


3 posted on 03/13/2006 12:56:01 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

Do you suggest that if drugs are leagalized police corruption will be less?


4 posted on 03/13/2006 12:59:14 PM PST by frogjerk (LIBERALISM: The perpetual insulting of common sense.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
Or maybe the existence of the police is a violation of the rights of the individual?
5 posted on 03/13/2006 1:00:04 PM PST by misterrob (Islam is a hate crime)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32
Let us apply the MSM Letty thought process. Guns in the hands of citizens kill, all citizens who have guns, they are killers. Answer, get rid of all guns.

Some cops are dirty, by association, all cops are dirty. Answer, get rid of all cops.
6 posted on 03/13/2006 1:01:24 PM PST by Ursus arctos horribilis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: freepatriot32
Bizarrely, Andrea Sullivan has remarried, and her new husband, Chicago Police Officer Michael Allegretti faces criminal charges he ordered women to expose themselves to avoid traffic tickets.

This babe sure knows how to pick 'em.

8 posted on 03/13/2006 1:04:12 PM PST by holymoly (Dick DeVos for MI Governor: http://www.devosforgovernor.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ursus arctos horribilis
Answer, get rid of all cops.

That'll be San Francisco's next move.

9 posted on 03/13/2006 1:04:14 PM PST by American Quilter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

ping for later


10 posted on 03/13/2006 1:04:49 PM PST by DariusBane (I do not separate people, as do the narrow-minded, into Greeks and barbarians.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: American Quilter

Sometimes I almost feel they deserve it.


11 posted on 03/13/2006 1:05:52 PM PST by jazusamo (:Gregory was riled while Hume smiled:)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
Do you suggest that if drugs are leagalized police corruption will be less?

Hey, let's just take it to the (il)logical conclusion. Let's have NOTHING illegal. No laws. Without laws, there would not be a need for cops. No cops? No cop corruption!

12 posted on 03/13/2006 1:07:43 PM PST by GLDNGUN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Ursus arctos horribilis
Answer, get rid of all cops.

Actually, we only need to get rid of 90%, provided we disarm the rest and arm the citizenry.

13 posted on 03/13/2006 1:09:14 PM PST by elkfersupper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

Newsflash: Just like there are scumbags in every occupation in the country, there are scumbag cops. There would be scumbag cops no matter what the drug laws were.

In other news, water is wet.

}:-)4


14 posted on 03/13/2006 1:14:23 PM PST by Moose4 ("I will shoulder my musket and brandish my sword/In defense of this land and the word of the Lord")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

I would post "Incarceration: This Week's Corrupt Felon Stories" but every time I click COPY -> PASTE from the original text, my computer bombs out from a lack of memory.


15 posted on 03/13/2006 1:14:48 PM PST by GreenAccord (Do I EVER change my tagline?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
Do you suggest that if drugs are leagalized police corruption will be less?

Yes that is exactly what i suggest.During prohibition one almost every cop in every big city was on the take from the rum running gangs and after that failed experiment in social engineering there were a lot of out of work corrupt federal cops that were on the take to the rum runners that were in danger of having to get real jobs.So as a make work program for those guys they created prohibition two and j edger hoover was so scared that they would corrupt his new FBI agents that he had congress pretty much create the dea to funnel all the corrupt feds to that agency and keep them away from the new FBI.

If you legalize drugs tomorrow the murder rate across the country would drop anywhere from 50-75 percent.The bloods and the crips would go bankrupt and most of the cops that are on the take to drug gangs would lose a lot of money and have fewer ways to be corrupt.There are still cops that protect bookie for a small fee but the classic barroom bookie is becoming an endangered species as Internet sportsbooks and casino gambling become more popular everyday

16 posted on 03/13/2006 1:16:43 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32
If you legalize drugs tomorrow the murder rate across the country would drop anywhere from 50-75 percent.

Which drugs would you legalize?

17 posted on 03/13/2006 1:19:04 PM PST by frogjerk (LIBERALISM: The perpetual insulting of common sense.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

Did I read that there are more people in jail in the USA than in China? Not per capita, but real numbers?

Could someone straighten me out on that?

Thanks


18 posted on 03/13/2006 1:23:45 PM PST by IRememberElian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

PING.


19 posted on 03/13/2006 1:23:55 PM PST by ziggy_dlo (freedom security:give up a little of either, you deserve neither liberalcracks)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Moose4
Newsflash: Just like there are scumbags in every occupation in the country, there are scumbag cops. There would be scumbag cops no matter what the drug laws were.

Right on! If drugs were legalized (or "decriminalized" tomorrow) does anyone suppose that drug dealers, who've been selling crack cocaine and heroin to minors (among others) would suddenly declare all their previously illegal income to the IRS so that they could be taxed out of the business? You'll still have corrupt cops following the drug dealers, 'cause that's where the money is. BTW, is there a uniform idea of what "legalization" or "decriminalization" entails?

20 posted on 03/13/2006 1:27:08 PM PST by pawdoggie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
Do you suggest that if drugs are leagalized police corruption will be less?

LOL! That was my thought. If drugs were legalized crooked cops could still shakedown motorists but then legally have posession of it.

Addicts still won't have any money to buy drugs whether or not they're legalized.

21 posted on 03/13/2006 1:29:10 PM PST by VeniVidiVici (What? Me worry?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

A total disgrace to their uniform and profession. Throw the book at them. Hopefully they will get put in a cell with a disgruntled customer.....


22 posted on 03/13/2006 1:29:37 PM PST by stm (You can fix a lot of things, but you can't fix stupid)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk; All
just like prohibition the murders and gang activity didnt materialize until after the substances were outlawed and the black market took over distribution.The violence and murder is coming from both sides of the law

dont forget the all encompassing the war on drugs is for the children that has been brought up on every drug thread since freerepublic has been founded.See below for some examples of how the drug war is protecting children

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2001/apr2001/peru-a24.shtml

Missionary plane shot down in Peru: collateral damage in US "drug war"

Following the revelation that a reconnaissance aircraft carrying CIA contract employees participated in the April 20 shoot-down of a plane carrying an American missionary family over the Peruvian Amazon region, Washington has attempted to pin the blame on the Peruvian military.

Whatever the exchange between the CIA contractors and the Peruvian Air Force officer aboard the spy plane, a Peruvian jet fighter was called in and shot into the plane, killing the woman and her baby. It then continued strafing the survivors—the wounded pilot, Ms. Bowers' husband James and their six-year-old son—as they clung to the plane's burning wreckage after it crashed into the Amazon River.

DEA Kills 14-Year-Old Girl in San Antonio, Claims Self Defense

Fourteen-year-old Ashley Villarreal of San Antonio died on February 11 after being shot in the head three days earlier by a DEA agent while driving away from her home.

Ashley Villarreal was the unintended victim of a DEA stake-out designed to catch her father, Joey Villarreal, whom the DEA suspected of involvement in cocaine sales.

The man in the vehicle, David Robles, was not the DEA's suspect.

According to Trevino, Ashley Villarreal continued to drive toward the approaching agents, at which point two DEA agents fired two shots each into the car, striking the girl in the back of the head. Trevino did not explain how a boxed-in car could continue to drive or how it became a threat to the narcs.

There are other questions and doubts about the police version of events. "The agents made it very clear to the people in the car that they were police, that they were agents," Trevino said. But David Robles told the Express News that as Ashley drove him away from the house, it appeared that they were being pursued by unknown assailants. Neither, said Robles, did the assailants identify themselves as law enforcement officers until after they shot into the trapped vehicle, fatally wounding the girl.

Robles' account was supported by "earwitnesses" who heard a crash and then shots. Manuel Martinez, who lives across the street from the shooting site, told the Express News he heard a crash followed by gunfire. "I heard them call to 'Stop! Don't move,'" he said. "I didn't hear them say they were policemen." Other witnesses cited by the Express News supported that account, raising the obvious question about what threat Ashley posed to the agents after her vehicle had already been stopped and boxed in.

DEA agent Bill Swierc has been named as the man who fired the fatal shots, and both the DEA and the San Antonio Police Department are investigating the killing. But as readers of this newsletter know, police shooters in drug cases are rarely bound over for prosecution.

http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/169/modesto.shtml

Last October, DRCNet reported on the shooting death of elementary school student Alberto Sepulveda during a raid by the Modesto, California, SWAT team as it executed a federal search warrant in a methamphetamine trafficking investigation Now, after three separate investigations by Modesto police and the city attorney, Modesto police can say only that it was an accident.

Hawn, a veteran member of the Modesto SWAT team, shot and killed young Sepulveda as the boy, following Hawn's barked commands, lay prone on his bedroom floor. At a January 10th press conference called to announce the result of the department's investigations, Police Chief Roy Wasden said Hawn's Benelli shotgun could have misfired, Hawn could have accidentally squeezed the trigger, or Hawn's equipment, particularly a knife on his belt, could have accidentally caused the gun to discharge.

Wasden, however, pointed the finger at the federal law enforcement agencies -- DEA, FBI, and IRS -- at whose behest the Modesto SWAT team executed the warrant.

rio drug war cops

On April 17, 2003, four unarmed male teens begged for their lives after being caught in a drug sting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Police shot them all in the back of the head, execution style. At their funerals, unrepentant officers harassed and intimidated the family members of their victims, hoping to scare them from pressing charges.

One night in 1993, 50 homeless children lay huddled together on the steps of a Rio church. According to media reports, five hooded men, arriving in vehicles, fired into their sleeping mass, killing four before they could begin to flee, perhaps before they awoke. A fifth was shot in the back as he ran for cover. Three more were abducted and two of those three were executed later that night. The third was left for dead after being shot in the face. It was later discovered that three of the hooded gunmen were off-duty military police, employed by the US in the war on drugs.

In 2001, police officially killed 52 children in Rio alone. The majority of all police killings in Rio were done with a single shot from behind or to the head. To keep the numbers down, police used secret graves to bury many little bodies

23 posted on 03/13/2006 1:35:21 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: elkfersupper

True. One can tell the crime climate of a nation by the number of police it has.


24 posted on 03/13/2006 1:35:44 PM PST by Ursus arctos horribilis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: 4bbldowndraft

in teh early 1970's a police agency in Harris county TX rulled a death a suicide. The guy was shot in the back 5 times with a bolt action 30-06.


25 posted on 03/13/2006 1:36:36 PM PST by TXBSAFH (Proud Dad of Twins, What Does Not Kill You Makes You Stronger!!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

My question still stands, which drugs would you legalize?


26 posted on 03/13/2006 1:41:54 PM PST by frogjerk (LIBERALISM: The perpetual insulting of common sense.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: IRememberElian
Did I read that there are more people in jail in the USA than in China? Not per capita, but real numbers? Could someone straighten me out on that?

the chinese just kill them rather than house/ rehabilitate them.
27 posted on 03/13/2006 1:42:52 PM PST by absolootezer0 ("My God, why have you forsaken us.. no wait, its the liberals that have forsaken you... my bad")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

Sounds more like the cracking down on corrupt cops.


28 posted on 03/13/2006 1:44:01 PM PST by Paul C. Jesup
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: IRememberElian
Does the United States lead the world in prison population?

from the above link

According to the International Centre for Prison Studies at King's College London, the U.S. currently has the largest documented prison population in the world, both in absolute and proportional terms. We've got roughly 2.03 million people behind bars, or 701 per 100,000 population. China has the second-largest number of prisoners (1.51 million, for a rate of 117 per 100,000), and Russia has the second-highest rate (606 per 100,000, for a total of 865,000). Russia had the highest rate for years, but has released hundreds of thousands of prisoners since 1998

29 posted on 03/13/2006 1:49:57 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: GLDNGUN; elkfersupper
GLDNGUN wrote: Hey, let's just take it to the (il)logical conclusion. Let's have NOTHING illegal. No laws. Without laws, there would not be a need for cops. No cops? No cop corruption!

elkfersupper wrote: Actually, we only need to get rid of 90%, provided we disarm the rest and arm the citizenry.

From my 10th-floor condo, with the aid of binoculars, I personally witnessed several crimes being committed this Saturday. Three men on motorcycles wearing yellow jackets were standing about half-a-mile away, on a street corner in an industrial area (i.e., no children playing or anything). Every so often, one would run into the street and flag down a car. After 15-20 minutes, the car would drive off - holding what I assume to be a bill totaling hundreds of dollars ("fine," plus insurance). During two hours, they ran no fewer than 30 motorists off the road. 30+ motorists that did nothing wrong to deserve to lose hundreds of dollars. In these 30+ transactions, who were the real criminals?

GLDNGUN: Is this the "need" for cops of which you speak? Should everything be illegal???

elkfersupper: At the very least, I'd like to get rid of 90% of what cops actually do. There may or may not be too many cops, but rather too many LAWS. Whoever is left can go back to "protecting and serving" rather than "enforcing the law."

30 posted on 03/13/2006 1:51:04 PM PST by Freedom_no_exceptions (No actual, intended, or imminent victim = no crime. No exceptions.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32; frogjerk
My question still stands, which drugs would you legalize?

Why don't you answer him/her?

31 posted on 03/13/2006 1:52:11 PM PST by apackof2 (You can stand me up at the gates of hell, I'll stand my ground and I won't back down)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
Which drugs would you legalize?

All of them.With certian restrictions on some like pcp and meth like if you want to do pcp or meth you would have to stay in a padded room away from others in the stores you buy them from becasue some people absolutely freak out out on it.So I would make them stay seperated from others so they cant harm them if the do freak out and being in a padded room they would not hurt themselves.

other drugs like marijuana i would say keep them nextto the cigarettes at krogers or a tobacco store where you can walk in and buy it and go home and smoke it to your hearts content

32 posted on 03/13/2006 1:57:15 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: apackof2

see post 32 i have been tracking down websites for some others on this thread as well as for al l the people on my libertarian ping list it takes a few minutes to answer people sometimes


33 posted on 03/13/2006 1:59:50 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32; IRememberElian
Those numbers have changed a little. We are now at either 724 per 100k or 726 per 100K, depending on which numbers you look at. The US Dept of Justice says 726 per 100K. Your source, the International Centre for Prison Studies says we're at 724 per 100k and that Russia has dropped to 581 per 100k. China has gone up from 117 to 118 per 100k.

You can find all the world incarceration rates and total number of people behind bars at this site : http://www.prisonstudies.org/ In order to get to the data, click on "English," then "World Prison Brief," the "Highest to Lowest Rates," then select from the pull down menu whether you want to look at at the totals or the per capita rates.
34 posted on 03/13/2006 2:36:43 PM PST by TKDietz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32
In some peoples' minds there are no bad cops, no matter what they do. All cops are hero's to them no matter how bad they might be.

The police do not like to police their own because to do so sheds light on the fact that there are bad cops. The stories you see on this thread are only the ones action was taken against, not all the ones who actually got caught breaking the law. Most of that is covered up.
35 posted on 03/13/2006 3:05:01 PM PST by Supernatural (Lay me doon in the caul caul groon, whaur afore monie mair huv gaun)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: IRememberElian
Did I read that there are more people in jail in the USA than in China? Not per capita, but real numbers?

We are number one per capita and real numbers! 1 in 37 adults living in the United States is in prison or has served time there. That is the highest incarceration level in the world.

Today, the USA keeps more than two million people behind bars...compared with only 200,000 three decades ago. With 5 percent of the world's population, we account for 25 percent of its prison population.

Number of prisoners
USA 2,021,223
China 1,428,126
Russia 919,330
India 281,380
Brazil 233,859

We are number one thanks to the War On Drugs.
.
36 posted on 03/13/2006 3:17:17 PM PST by mugs99 (Don't take life too seriously, you won't get out alive.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: frogjerk
My question still stands, which drugs would you legalize?

That is determined by the voters in each state. That's the only Constitutional way to regulate.
.
37 posted on 03/13/2006 3:20:39 PM PST by mugs99 (Don't take life too seriously, you won't get out alive.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: mugs99

We don't execute as many prisoners as China and Russia do.


38 posted on 03/13/2006 3:35:17 PM PST by Thunder90
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32
If you legalize drugs tomorrow the murder rate across the country would drop anywhere from 50-75 percent.

And you came up with that number how again?

Your idea of legalizing drugs is horrifically bad. I can't believe sane, rational people actually think it has any merit. Wait, make that I DON'T believe sane, rational people actually think it has any merit. Maybe you should use a new tagline...something like...give me liberty or give me meth!

39 posted on 03/13/2006 3:54:23 PM PST by GLDNGUN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Freedom_no_exceptions
I personally witnessed several crimes being committed this Saturday.

They only do that at select times on weekdays around here. Presumably to increase the likelihood of contacting people with jobs that are too busy to fight and have income and assets.

Weekends are reserved for the seat belt / child safety seat / glass of wine with dinner scam.

40 posted on 03/13/2006 5:39:29 PM PST by elkfersupper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32; frogjerk
Which drugs would you legalize?

Actually, I would start with antihistamines / decongestants and tobacco products. Maybe alcohol.

I would also legalize "strike-anywhere" matches, fast food and soft drinks.

The rest would probably take care of itself.

41 posted on 03/13/2006 5:56:58 PM PST by elkfersupper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Thunder90

"We don't execute as many prisoners as China and Russia do."

Argh - research before you post!! There is a moratorium on the death penalty in Russia (it's been years since they executed anyone). So, we actually DO execute more prisoners. Now, if the population over there was allowed to vote on the issue, it'd be back on the table (same in Great Britain, if you ask me).


42 posted on 03/13/2006 5:58:07 PM PST by Romanov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: inneroutlaw

Ping to #36.


43 posted on 03/13/2006 5:58:56 PM PST by elkfersupper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Thunder90
We don't execute as many prisoners as China and Russia do

True, but we execute more than all the countries of Europe...and we still have more of our citizens behind bars than Europe.

We are 5% of the world's population. We have 25% of the worlds prison population. We have become a police state and that's a fact.
. .
44 posted on 03/13/2006 6:08:27 PM PST by mugs99 (Don't take life too seriously, you won't get out alive.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Ursus arctos horribilis; freepatriot32
Some cops are dirty, by association, all cops are dirty. Answer, get rid of all cops.

Yeah, kinda like picking the "Peaceful Muslim" out of the crowd. A bit hard to do anymore, isn't it? Blackbird.

45 posted on 03/13/2006 6:11:49 PM PST by BlackbirdSST (Diapers, like Politicians, need regular changing for the same reason!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

I get it. You hate the police.


46 posted on 03/13/2006 6:33:01 PM PST by Mojave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: GLDNGUN

How does America's murder rate compare to countries where more drugs are legalized?

I'm curious.


47 posted on 03/13/2006 8:33:59 PM PST by planekT (<- http://www.wadejacoby.com/pedro/ ->)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: GLDNGUN
If you legalize drugs tomorrow the murder rate across the country would drop anywhere from 50-75 percent.

And you came up with that number how again?

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Academic/drugs_and_violence/Drugs_and_violence.html

Notice where the spikes are ?Hmmmm what happen around the late 20s to late 30s that could possibly explain that spike and what happened around 1972 to the present that could possibly explain that spike in murder ?

From the link at the top of the page

A glance at the figures for U.S. murder rates over the course of this century provides some support for the critics' position (Figure 1).[1] Murder rates were high during the period of alcohol prohibition, fell after repeal, rose again with increased efforts to prohibit illegal drugs, and remain high.

The impression given by the graph is confirmed by more sophisticated analysis. Jeffrey A. Miron has analyzed the relation between violent crime in the U.S., as measured by the murder rate, and the enforcement of drug prohibition (including alcohol prohibition) as measured by expenditures by the federal agencies in charge of enforcing prohibition (Figure 2), over the entire period for which murder rates are available on a national basis. His statistical results "suggest the homicide rate is currently 25%-75% higher than it would be in the absence of drug prohibition."[2]

The case of the U.S. is particularly interesting for at least two reasons. One is that the U.S. murder rate is anomalously high relative to other countries that are otherwise similar–about 8 to 10 murders per 100,000 population over the past two decades, compared to 1 to 2 for countries such as Canada, Australia, the U.K. and countries in western Europe. The other is that the U.S. provides data on both the murder rate and enforcement of drug prohibition over a fairly long period of time.

48 posted on 03/13/2006 8:34:13 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: planekT

see post 48


49 posted on 03/13/2006 8:36:27 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Freedom_no_exceptions
I personally witnessed several crimes being committed this Saturday. Three men on motorcycles wearing yellow jackets...

Sounds like a sting operation.

50 posted on 03/13/2006 8:49:39 PM PST by IRememberElian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-71 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Smoky Backroom
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson