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Speaker supports alternatives to the war on drugs (EXPLOSIVE ALL EXITS NO WAITING BARF ALERT)
Savannah Morning News ^

Posted on 02/16/2003 8:46:15 PM PST by new cruelty

Nora Callahan knows firsthand the effects of America's war on drugs.

Her brother was indicted for a drug conspiracy in 1989.

After he was sent to prison for 27 years, she began trying to educate the public about how drug laws have increased the prison population.

As executive director of the November Coalition in Colville, Wash., Callahan travels nationwide talking about the drawbacks of punitive drug laws. She speaks tonight at Savannah State University.

Jails and prisons are clogged with people serving sentences for drug offenses, many of which are non-violent, Callahan said. A drug arrest in any family, Callahan says, is frightening introduction to conspiracy statutes, government's liberal use of informants and guideline-sentencing laws,

"We are dedicated to abolishing destructive prohibition laws whose enforcement does far more harm than any intended good," Callahan said.

According to the November Coalition -- a nonprofit founded to give a voice to drug war prisoners and their family members -- one in four prisoners nationwide is serving time for a drug law violation. In the federal system, these people make up about 60 percent of the prison population, Callahan said.

"We call it a war on drugs, but it's actually a war against our own citizens," said Lisa Lane, founder of the Savannah group, Coalition of Compassionate Drug Policy Reform.

The group supports treatment for drug offenders -- not prison -- and opposes mandatory minimum sentencing laws, which takes away judges' discretion, Lane said.

"Not only does treatment work, whereas incarceration does not, it's also less expensive," Lane said. "It's fiscally much more responsible to put our money in something that works, instead of continuing to put our money into this failed drug war that shows no sign of working."


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: drugskill
Those poor, poor victimized drug offenders.
1 posted on 02/16/2003 8:46:16 PM PST by new cruelty
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To: new cruelty
Those poor, poor victimized drug offenders.

Yah, like the guy up the road from me who got shot in a no-knock raid. Trouble is, the cops had the wrong address.

If you truly see the drug war in such simplistic terms, you must not have debated it very intently. It's pretty easy to make a case that the cure is worse than the disease. See any random drug war thread for details.

2 posted on 02/16/2003 8:53:31 PM PST by Joe Bonforte
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To: new cruelty
this is obviously a troll post
3 posted on 02/16/2003 8:55:03 PM PST by agitator (Ok, mic check...line one...)
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To: new cruelty
How dare they intoxicate themselves! Thank god we can lock them up to be raped and brutalized, and turned into violent monsters. It's for their own good, really.
4 posted on 02/16/2003 8:58:03 PM PST by Britton J Wingfield
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To: agitator
Relax, agitator, relax. I'm no troll.
5 posted on 02/16/2003 8:58:20 PM PST by new cruelty
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To: Joe Bonforte
So to see the war on drugs in simplistic terms is to not have debated the issue very intently, but it is easy to make a case that the cure for said war is worse than the disease?

That sucks about the guy up the road from you who got shot in a no knock raid because the cops had the wrong address.

6 posted on 02/16/2003 9:06:41 PM PST by new cruelty
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To: new cruelty
"That sucks about the guy up the road from you who got shot in a no knock raid because the cops had the wrong address. "

Yeah... well.. "That sucks" doesn't really sum it up quite completely for his family I'm sure.

All drugs should be legalized. The black market dries up, the funding of terrorist activities through the drug trade would end, and We The People would no longer have to fund a war on our own citizens so that cultural authoritarians could feel warm and tingly whenever someone went to jail over things like posessing a dried plant.

Who loses in this scenario? Drug dealers/cartels, terrorists, cultural authoritarians, the incredibly bloated government agencies responsible for the upkeep of the war, and prison construction companies. Which of the 5 are you part of, that you have so much enthusiasm for their cause?

7 posted on 02/17/2003 3:13:21 AM PST by Qwerty
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To: Qwerty
That too sounds simplistic.
8 posted on 02/17/2003 6:07:34 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: new cruelty
So to see the war on drugs in simplistic terms is to not have debated the issue very intently, but it is easy to make a case that the cure for said war is worse than the disease?

Ah, I see your problem. Yes, it is difficult to understand debate when you confuse the meaning of two words that mean very different things. I don't have the time for extended tutelage, but I'll try to help you out here.

I can easily forgive this particular mistake because French intellectuals (for example) make it all the time over war in Iraq. It's pretty easy to make a case that Sadaam must be removed from power (would you not agree?), but the French denigrate our policy by calling it "simplisime" (simplistic), which it clearly is not.

"Simplistic" means over-simplified, which typically means that essential details have been left out or intentionally ignored.

"Easy to make a case" mean that the case is pretty straightforward, but does not imply there's anything logically wrong with it.

Someone who lumps all drug users into a single despicable bucket, and who believes any attempt to help them deserves a barf alert, is clearly being simplistic. Consumption of drugs, just like that of alcohol and tobacco, is a more complex issue that that.

However, the case against the drug war is indeed easy to make from several directions - innocent lives lost, complete ineffectiveness, erosion of civil rights, preposterous amounts of money spent, etc. And the case for the drug war is much harder to make (though with anything that damages people, there is indeed such a case).

A "simplistic" debater (on either side) would claim, as you seem to, that there was no case at all for the other side. I do not claim that pro-drug-war people have no case at all - merely that it's not a very strong one, and that it's easy to make a strong case against the drug war along the lines of lives lost, liberties lost, money lost, etc.

I wish you well in your quest to better understand the English language, and use it more effectively in debate. I'm sure it will benefit you - for example, your posts will be a lot less likely to be moved to the back room, so you'll have the privilege of debating more Free Republic posters.

9 posted on 02/17/2003 8:08:45 AM PST by Joe Bonforte
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To: Joe Bonforte
Drugs are bad, Joe. Just say no.
10 posted on 02/17/2003 9:06:03 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: new cruelty
Drugs are bad, Joe. Just say no.

I agree. I believe the same about alcohol and tobacco, so I just say no to all of them. They are all nasty habits, all dangerous to one degree or another.

That's a completely separate issue from whether they should be legal. We (as a society) decided, correctly I believe, that prohibition of alcohol was a bad idea, despite the harm alcohol causes. I believe exactly the same case holds for illegal drugs.

This is another important point to understand about debating the issue. Saying something should be legal is not the same as saying that it's a good idea. Assuming that someone is against the drug war just because they want to use drugs is false far more often than not.

11 posted on 02/17/2003 10:18:24 AM PST by Joe Bonforte
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To: Joe Bonforte
"Saying something should be legal is not the same as saying that it's a good idea."

That's not what is going on here. Taking something that was illegal for a number of decades and now saying that it should be legal sends a completely different message.

Look what happened with abortion. Making that legal may not have sent the message that it was a good idea, but it sure increased that activity, didn't it?

"Assuming that someone is against the drug war just because they want to use drugs is false far more often than not."

This is a perfect example of moral relativism. That is, "Drugs are bad, I don't do drugs, I'm not in favor of others doing drugs, but they should be legal and if you choose to do drugs that's up to you."

12 posted on 02/17/2003 3:29:42 PM PST by robertpaulsen
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To: robertpaulsen
This is a perfect example of moral relativism. That is, "Drugs are bad, I don't do drugs, I'm not in favor of others doing drugs, but they should be legal and if you choose to do drugs that's up to you."

IT is fine for an individual or group to debate the above issue - even adopt a position that says the group will tell you how to act.

It is an entirely different issue when it is a government that is going to make a morality-based decision for you and enforce it's decision against you via it's enormous police power. The cost-benefit analysis of the WOD leads one to the inescapable conclusion that it does entirely too much violence to all our liberties and the Constitution (not too mention specific examples of violence to innocent citizens) to continue. It will never be effective in reducing drug use - but it will be very effective in destroying our privacy and liberties.

13 posted on 02/17/2003 3:42:19 PM PST by Abundy
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To: Abundy
You are talking about our government, I assume. The elected government. You know, the one that every two years wipes clean the House of Representatives (where the laws are written), and wipes clean one-third of the Senate, the vacancies of both voted on by the people?

You act as though we don't have a say. Also, you're acting as though our (not "the") government isn't doing what the voters want them to do. I think they are. Over-zealous at times, yes, but the voters in this country do not want marijuana to be legal. (gasp!)

14 posted on 02/17/2003 4:05:18 PM PST by robertpaulsen
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To: robertpaulsen
You know, the one that every two years wipes clean the House of Representatives (where the laws are written), and wipes clean one-third of the Senate, the vacancies of both voted on by the people?

And isn't it surprising how many of the *new* members are acutally the same old incumbents.

They must have been reëlected because they did such a good job last time around.

15 posted on 02/17/2003 4:21:26 PM PST by Oztrich Boy
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To: new cruelty
What is your drug of choice, beer? wine, the hard stuff like a good single malt?
16 posted on 02/17/2003 5:20:18 PM PST by thepitts
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To: thepitts
Root beer.
17 posted on 02/17/2003 7:01:52 PM PST by new cruelty
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To: robertpaulsen
Over-zealous at times, yes, but the voters in this country do not want marijuana to be legal. (gasp!)

First, as is often pointed out this nation is not and should not be a democracy. There are quite a few areas that should not be subjected to the will of the majority. Second, the voters in California do want marijuana at least partially legalized, but the feds wouldn't permit it. Is federalism only a good thing if the states do exactly what you want?

18 posted on 02/17/2003 7:58:32 PM PST by ThinkDifferent
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To: new cruelty
So you drink carbonated sugar water. Caffeine and sugar are your drugs. Funny... I haven't had a soda in a long time. You know why? Because, as a beverage, they are an UNHEALTHY choice. Much like drugs. Still, if you want to sit around and drink a soda which will actually dehydrate instead of hydrating you, and at the same time supply you with a huge dose of sugar.. be my guest. If the government sought to protect all the lardbutts in america from their own overeating and soda consumption, I'd oppose that too.

It truly IS simple. Either we want people to choose what they do with their lives and bodies, or we want the government to get involved and make the decisions for all of us.

19 posted on 02/17/2003 8:41:29 PM PST by Qwerty
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To: Qwerty
Drugs are bad, Qwerty. Just say no.
20 posted on 02/18/2003 3:22:35 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: robertpaulsen
This is a perfect example of moral relativism.

Liberty includes the freedom to do with ones life what one chooses, even if it is self destructive. Otherwise, it is not YOUR life, or YOUR rights. The state has taken authority, then, in deciding what behavior an individual may undertake.

I know: for the common good.

All of the tyrannies, abrogation of rights, and mountains of human corpses are by products of the mantra "for the common good, for the children, for society, for God."

21 posted on 02/18/2003 5:55:32 AM PST by galt-jw
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To: new cruelty
Statism is evil, nc. Just say no.
22 posted on 02/18/2003 5:56:15 AM PST by galt-jw
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To: galt-jw
Pedophilia is evil, Galt-jw. Just say no.
23 posted on 02/18/2003 6:01:29 AM PST by new cruelty
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(Buffalo, NY, February 13, 2003) - - The FBI says its making a dent in the war on drugs in Buffalo.

Federal agents arrested thirteen people on federal drug trafficking charges.

The FBI believes the suspects have been supplying drug dealers on Montana Street in Buffalo with large amounts of heroin and cocaine for the past two and a half years.

Two out of the three suspected "kingpins" are from Amherst.

Police and Montana Street neighbors say people from the city and the suburbs would sometimes arrive early in the morning to buy drugs.

24 posted on 02/18/2003 6:06:30 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: ThinkDifferent
"There are quite a few areas that should not be subjected to the will of the majority. Second, the voters in California do want marijuana at least partially legalized"

On this one, I had to laugh.

You're saying that the will of the majority should not ban marijuana, but the will of the majority should be allowed to legalize it?

25 posted on 02/18/2003 6:43:10 AM PST by robertpaulsen
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To: robertpaulsen
You're saying that the will of the majority should not ban marijuana, but the will of the majority should be allowed to legalize it?

No, just pointing out that you are advocating the opposite on both counts, which is logically indefensible. Personally I believe that the citizens of a state should decide what drugs are legal; the federal government has no Constitutional role.

26 posted on 02/18/2003 11:51:09 AM PST by ThinkDifferent
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To: ThinkDifferent
Far from it. In my post #14, I referred to the process of electing our representatives. This is a republic, you know, not a democracy.

You, on the other hand, advocate that the citizens vote directly on the issue. You're the one who's advocating direct voting, not me.

27 posted on 02/18/2003 1:00:52 PM PST by robertpaulsen
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To: new cruelty
"she began trying to educate the public about how drug laws have increased the prison population."...... I do believe that NON-COMPLIANCE to the drug laws have increased the prison population. Always blaming something else instead of accepting responsibility for their actions.
28 posted on 02/18/2003 9:30:17 PM PST by irishtenor
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To: new cruelty
Well, when you can't support your position, resort to jingoism. Makes me want to ask my parents if they still have my DARE shirt from 5th grade.
29 posted on 02/19/2003 12:10:17 AM PST by Qwerty
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To: robertpaulsen
This is a perfect example of moral relativism. That is, "Drugs are bad, I don't do drugs, I'm not in favor of others doing drugs, but they should be legal and if you choose to do drugs that's up to you."

Replace the word drugs with the word abortion in your above italicized passage and you basically have Mario Cuomo's position on abortion.

30 posted on 02/19/2003 12:15:10 AM PST by Dane
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To: irishtenor

31 posted on 02/19/2003 4:29:55 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: Qwerty
It was suitable for the occasion.
32 posted on 02/19/2003 6:12:44 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: new cruelty
You're right. Smarmy suits you.
33 posted on 02/19/2003 6:31:21 AM PST by Qwerty
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To: Qwerty
Its the least you deserve.
34 posted on 02/19/2003 6:33:13 AM PST by new cruelty
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Alleged NYC drug dealer nabbed in task force raid

FITCHBURG -- Hailing a taxicab couldn't get Jeffrey T. Madison far enough from the Thunderbird Motor Lodge on Thursday afternoon.

Madison, a suspected drug dealer from New York, was arrested during a regional police task force drug raid not far from the Lunenburg Street motel, where he was staying in room 216.

Police obtained a search warrant for 24-year-old Madison's motel room after he was found selling crack cocaine to an undercover police officer, according to a state police detective report authored by Sgt. Paul Boundy and trooper Michael Sampson.

Before members of the state detective unit and the North County Drug Task Force could execute the warrant, police said the suspect and a fellow motel occupant, Patricia Fitzgerald, stepped into the back of a taxicab just before 4 p.m. Thursday.

Police officers then pulled over the cab on John Fitch Highway and found that Madison was in possession of a plastic bag of heroin and a plastic bag of crack cocaine. Police also seized from the suspect a cell phone, packaging materials, a quantity of Manitol and about $11,000, according to the report.

Madison was arrested and charged with possession of heroin with intent to distribute, possession of crack cocaine with intent to distribute and distribution of crack cocaine.

At Fitchburg District Court on Friday morning, Judge Paul LoConto ordered the suspect, originally thought to be from Leominster, held on $2,500 bail until a court appearance on March 4.

But then, in the same morning, an assistant district attorney filed an out-of-state query for the Brooklyn resident and found the suspect had a lengthy criminal history in New York.

When the case was brought quickly back to court, LoConto upped the bail to $7,500, said Elizabeth Stammo, spokeswoman for the Worcester County district attorney's office.

Fitzgerald, who was arrested in possession of a leafy substance believed to be marijuana, was taken by police to the Worcester bus terminal and told she would later be summoned to court, according to the police report.

Despite the altered bail, the pretrial hearing for Madison still will be held March 4 in Fitchburg District Court.

35 posted on 02/19/2003 6:46:42 AM PST by new cruelty
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Portland launching effort to curb drug deaths

PORTLAND (AP) -- Portland is launching an effort to curb the accidental drug deaths that have plagued the city in the last year.

City public health officials have been meeting over the past week with hospital representatives, treatment professionals, law enforcement and addicts to better understand the overdose phenomenon.

The number of drug deaths in Maine's largest city jumped from 16 in 2001 to 28 last year. There have been no fatal overdoses in Portland so far this year.

Medical and police officials say the factors behind the surge include a new group of painkiller abusers, a resurgence of heroin addiction and the unforeseen popularity of methadone as a recreational drug

State officials will be studying Portland's experience in hopes of duplicating any successes in other parts of the state.

Maine had at least 136 drug overdose deaths last year. That's compared to just 34 five years ago.

36 posted on 02/19/2003 8:46:03 AM PST by new cruelty
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