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To: Steve Newton
I have to wonder how much of this is true and how much may be urban legend. IIRC, the US Army was still strictly segregated in 1944. I'd think it would have been highly unlikely that a black soldier would have been on 'detached service' in that time period.

From Combat Magazine

JODY CALL : rhythmic chants or rhyming songs intended to coordinate marching tempo, sometimes shortened to JODY; probably derived from labor songs that paced the work and maintained the processing order. These songs, along with country and blues, share the common miseries of ordinary people, featuring the archetypal JODY as villain or rake, who typically wins the soldier's pay and possessions, seduces the serviceman's wife and dog! See CADENCE, HEP, CHANTEY, HOISE. [nb: some revisionists, by ignoring the extensive history of martial music and work songs going back to ancient China and early Rome, are "crediting" segregated Negro troops with the 'invention' of CADENCE calls for the improvement of morale during training in WWII, specifically an impromptu "Sound Off" CADENCE call initiated by PVT Willie Duckworth while marching in the Provisional Training Center of Fort Slocum, New York, in May 1944, and later identified as the "Duckworth Chant" in folklore. It's another insidious myth and pernicious lie perpetrated upon the gullible by self-anointed elitists! The similarity of JODY to every carpetbagger and scalawag argues demonstrably for a 19th Century development, as does the word 'cadence' in early Army songs ("count off the cadence loud and strong"), but even more is the persistence of sea chanteys by sailors laboring at common tasks.]

12 posted on 09/22/2005 2:18:59 PM PDT by Bob
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To: Bob

Could be

But the info came from the DoD.

Hum. Now thats saying something isn't it.

And your right they were segregated. As the story illustrates.

Good points

Steve


14 posted on 09/22/2005 2:26:42 PM PDT by Steve Newton
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To: Bob

oh yes

http://users.erols.com/loriryan/history.html

Steve


15 posted on 09/22/2005 2:29:51 PM PDT by Steve Newton
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To: Bob

I was a classics major at one time and recall reading where ancient Greek armies marched with music. I think I can even recall seeing paintings of slaves (maybe) playing flutes in front of the soldiers.


19 posted on 09/22/2005 2:37:32 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Bob
I am the historian of Ft. Slocum, NY (whence the Jody, aka Duckworth chant, originated). No it is not an urban legend. Pvt. (later T/4) Willie Lee Duckworth Sr. did not conjure the Jody out of thin air; but what he did was innovative, and involved the cooperation of other players, such as the post CO Col. Bernard Lentz, the post band, and the drillmasters of the Provisional Training Center. You can find a short general account of the development of the Jody on the Ft Slocum Features page of my website . On the subject of integration, while Truman did not make it official until years later, and while combat units remained segregated, there was limited racial mixing at Ft. Slocum during WWII. Duckworth was apparently one of 8 Black troops on detached duty with the Provisional Training Center in 1944 though within that unit they were kept segregated. Later, 1945-46 Slocum conducted rehabilitation training for court-martialed soldiers, and these classes were fully integrated. There are a number of photos of this, one of which is on the above page following the tale of the Jody.
86 posted on 05/09/2006 11:19:35 AM PDT by Michael A Cavanaugh (Duckworth's contribution to the Jody call is not an urban legend)
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