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X-Planets ( extrasolar planets, and the various planets X )
Our Tiny Little Minds ^ | various | self et al

Posted on 06/09/2006 10:50:42 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

New Scientist for Dec 14, 2002, had a cover story for Planet X:

The Hunt for Planet X
by Heather Couper
and Nigel Henbest
Just over a year after the New Horizons' launch, it will... pick up enough velocity to reach Pluto, possibly as early as July 2015... In their new research, Melita and Brunini have explored three possible reasons for the Kuiper Cliff... The third possibility is that the region beyond was brushed clear by the gravity of Planet X... the KBO orbits they have investigated so far fit in best with the influence of a Planet X.


TOPICS: Astronomy
KEYWORDS: 2002cr46; 2003fx128; 55cancri; asteroid; centaur; comet; extrasolar; geoffmarcy; hd209458b; planetx; xplanets
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Planets Might Orbit Backward around Odd Star
Space dot com | 13 February 2006 | Robert Roy Britt
Posted on 02/20/2006 1:49:55 AM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1582016/posts


51 posted on 06/29/2006 12:25:50 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006.)
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First Neptune Trojan Discovered
Lowell Observatory | January 8, 2003 | Kristi Phillips, Manager of Media Relations and Public Affairs
Posted on 12/28/2005 6:40:34 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1548366/posts


52 posted on 06/29/2006 12:49:04 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006.)
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New Planet Is Bigger Than Pluto
AP on Yahoo | 2/1/06 | Alicia Chang - ap
Posted on 02/01/2006 2:04:55 PM EST by NormsRevenge
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1569542/posts

Moving the Orbits of Planets
David Jewitt | Last updated Sep 2004 | David Jewitt
Posted on 02/02/2006 12:44:25 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1570230/posts

We're going on a planet hunt
EurekAlert | 04/05/06 | Claire Bowles
Posted on 04/05/2006 10:53:38 PM EDT by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/1610016/posts


53 posted on 06/29/2006 12:53:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006.)
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Here's an explanatory note from my first attempt at X-Planets, or more accurately, the 2005 update of my first attempt:
The name X-Planets is a play on the terms "exploding planets", "extrasolar planets", and "Planet X", the last of which has been used by astronomers to designate a hypothetical, undiscovered, or recently discovered planetary body. It isn't intended nor should it be inferred to be a play on the name of that famous TV drama about the FBI agents who investigate every paranormal phenomenon they encounter except for the fact that their cellular phones always work, even under the Antarctic icecap. It makes Gilligan's Island's Professor's coconut-based nuclear reactor look plausible.

That last sentence was just an excuse to use three possessive words in a row. It was fun. The Professor never made a nuclear reactor out of coconuts. And I can't remember if the FBI agents used their cell phones when they went to Antarctica that time.

54 posted on 06/30/2006 9:12:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006.)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum
Giant "starshade" could reveal new exoplanets
by Belle Dumé
PhysicsWeb
News for July 2006
An astrophysicist in the US has devised an unusual way to spot extrasolar planets -- by blocking the light from their parent star with a space-based shield. Webster Cash of the University of Colorado says that a thin, sunflower-shaped plastic screen measuring about 50 metres across could be enough to allow planets as small as the Earth to be observed directly. The big snag is that the shield, dubbed a starshade, would have to be attached to a spacecraft and placed tens of thousands of kilometres away from a space telescope. Cash's design may sound like science fiction, but it has already received a $400,000 funding boost from NASA (Nature 442 51).

55 posted on 07/07/2006 8:18:47 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Starshade Brings Fresh Hope In Search For Alien Life
The Telegraph (UK) | 7-6-2006 | Roger Highfield
Posted on 07/05/2006 8:35:59 PM EDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1660967/posts


56 posted on 07/08/2006 11:13:13 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum

regarding this story (also linked in message #1):

EXCLUSIVE: First Confirmed Picture of a Planet Beyond the Solar System
Space.com | April 1, 2005 | Robert Roy Britt
Posted on 04/01/2005 11:35:44 AM PST by conservativecorner
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1375632/posts

an earlier claim was revived (also linked in message #1):

Scientists Say Red Speck Is Indeed Huge New Planet
NY Times | April 30, 2005 | DENNIS OVERBYE
Posted on 04/30/2005 1:22:03 AM EDT by neverdem
http://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1394116/posts


57 posted on 07/19/2006 8:38:37 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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NASA: Planet Formed 13 Billion Years Ago
Yahoo! News | 7/10/03 | Deborah Zabarenko - Reuters
Posted on 07/10/2003 9:56:07 PM EDT by NormsRevenge
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/943992/posts


58 posted on 07/19/2006 8:43:33 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum

sort of related:

Mystery of explosive star solved
space.com | 07/20/06 | Ker Than
Posted on 07/21/2006 9:28:00 PM EDT by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1670229/posts


59 posted on 07/21/2006 11:59:27 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum

Super-Sized Rocky Planet Found
Discovery.com | 03/14/06 | Irene Klotz
Posted on 03/14/2006 9:39:47 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1596475/posts


60 posted on 07/23/2006 11:55:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Just-Found Planets Near Earth's Size (3 new planets)
Washington Post | 8-31-04 | Shankar Vedantam
Posted on 08/31/2004 11:42:10 PM EDT by Indy Pendance
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1204417/posts


61 posted on 07/23/2006 11:56:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Models Show One Nearby Star System Could Host Earth-Like Planet
Newswise | 07/24/06
Posted on 07/24/2006 8:46:03 PM EDT by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1671567/posts


62 posted on 07/24/2006 8:13:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Artist's concept of an extrasolar gas giant and hypothetical moons (PlanetQuest)

PlanetQuest

63 posted on 07/24/2006 10:28:27 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This is a flashing prototype. I do stuff like this because I'm starved for attention.

64 posted on 07/24/2006 11:25:49 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Is this better?
or this?

65 posted on 07/24/2006 11:29:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Okay, this substitutes the link for "post" to actually post a new topic...

66 posted on 07/24/2006 11:31:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Pluto thought to be warming up
ABC News | ABC News
Posted on 07/26/2006 9:53:09 PM EDT by MNJohnnie
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1672928/posts


67 posted on 07/26/2006 11:16:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Wednesday, June 21, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Planet-Forming Disks Might Put the Brakes on Stars
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | July 24, 2006 | Whitney Clavin
Posted on 07/31/2006 1:04:39 AM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1674914/posts

Composition of a Comet Poses a Puzzle for Scientists
NY Times | September 7, 2005 | KENNETH CHANG
Posted on 09/07/2005 3:10:01 PM EDT by neverdem
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1479490/posts

Space telescope discovery raises prospect of mini solar systems
Bakersfield Californian | 2/7/05 | John Antczak - AP
Posted on 02/07/2005 11:54:22 PM EST by NormsRevenge
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1338340/posts


68 posted on 07/30/2006 10:06:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Interactive Extra-solar Planets Catalog
http://exoplanet.eu/catalog.php


69 posted on 07/30/2006 10:33:27 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Hubble Site: Star with Planet:
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/category/star/star%20with%20planet/


70 posted on 07/30/2006 10:39:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Questioning Terrestrial Planets
spacedaily | 04/28/05
Posted on 04/28/2005 9:45:22 PM EDT by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1393276/posts


71 posted on 07/30/2006 10:50:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Suspected Protoplanet May Really Be a Distant Star (TMR-1c)
by Susan Tereby
April 6, 2000
Follow-up observations of an unusual object initially suspected to be the first directly detected planet outside our solar system have shown that the object is too hot to be a planet.

Astronomers now believe it is more likely that the strange object is a background star whose light has been dimmed and reddened by interstellar dust, giving the illusion that it is in the vicinity of the double star system in which it was initially believed to have been a planet.

72 posted on 07/30/2006 10:54:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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"This comprehensive assessment of exoplanet systems indicates that solar systems are found in a variety of stellar multiplicity environments -- singles, binaries, and triple sand that planets survive the postmain-sequence evolution of companion stars."
Two Suns in The Sky:
Stellar Multiplicity
in Exoplanet Systems

Deepak Raghavan, Todd J. Henry,
Brian D. Mason, John P. Subasavage,
Wei-Chun Jao, Thom D. Beaulieu,
and Nigel C. Hambly
Astrophysical Journal
University of Chicago Press
Abstract: We present results of a reconnaissance for stellar companions to all 131 radial velocitydetected candidate extrasolar planetary systems known as of 2005 July 1. Common proper-motion companions were investigated using the multiepoch STScI Digitized Sky Surveys and confirmed by matching the trigonometric parallax distances of the primaries to companion distances estimated photometrically. We also attempt to confirm or refute companions listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog, in the Catalogs of Nearby Stars Series by Gliese and Jahreiß, in Hipparcos results, and in Duquennoy & Mayor's radial velocity survey. Our findings indicate that a lower limit of 30 (23%) of the 131 exoplanet systems have stellar companions. We report new stellar companions to HD 38529 and HD 188015 and a new candidate companion to HD 169830. We confirm many previously reported stellar companions, including six stars in five systems, that are recognized for the first time as companions to exoplanet hosts. We have found evidence that 20 entries in the Washington Double Star Catalog are not gravitationally bound companions. At least three (HD 178911, 16 Cyg B, and HD 219449), and possibly five (including HD 41004 and HD 38529), of the exoplanet systems reside in triple-star systems. Three exoplanet systems (GJ 86, HD 41004, and Cep) have potentially close-in stellar companions, with planets at roughly MercuryMars distances from the host star and stellar companions at projected separations of 20 AU, similar to the SunUranus distance. Finally, two of the exoplanet systems contain white dwarf companions. This comprehensive assessment of exoplanet systems indicates that solar systems are found in a variety of stellar multiplicity environmentssingles, binaries, and triplesand that planets survive the postmain-sequence evolution of companion stars.

73 posted on 07/30/2006 10:58:25 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum

26th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union
Public release date: 31-Jul-2006
Contact: Lars Lindberg Christensen
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-07/iau-mif073106.php

"Roughly 15 press briefings are expected on a range of topics, including a possible Definition of a Planet (see below), Near Earth Objects: Risk or Opportunity?, the latest results from the largest telescopes in ground and in space, extrasolar planets, the state of the future large telescopes on the ground and in space, Black Holes anno 2006 and much more. A new and untested concept will be the Hot Topics Special Session 4 on Friday 18 August and Tuesday 22 August where fresh results from various fields will be presented. Special Session 2 is dedicated to education, and Special Session 5 to astronomy for the developing world -- two areas of great importance to the IAU."


74 posted on 08/01/2006 8:53:54 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum

Theory Proposes New View of Sun and Earth's Creation
Spaceref | May 20, 2004
Posted on 05/20/2004 9:02:28 PM EDT by SteveH
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1139472/posts


75 posted on 08/03/2006 6:35:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Object Survives Being Swallowed by a Star
Space.com on Yahoo | 8/3/06 | Ker Than
Posted on 08/03/2006 1:40:47 PM EDT by NormsRevenge
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1677175/posts


76 posted on 08/03/2006 9:09:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Mass limit on Nemesis
Bull. Astr. Soc. India | after 10 February 2005 | Varun Bhalerao and M.N. Vahia
Posted on 08/04/2006 12:24:16 AM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1677507/posts


77 posted on 08/03/2006 9:26:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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all from 2006, missed them the first time through, or somethin':

Astronomer announces shortlist of stellar candidates for habitable worlds
EurekaAlert | 02/18/06 | Earl Lane
Posted on 02/18/2006 4:26:06 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1581281/posts

Astronomer hopes to spot an inviting planet or two
Baltimore Sun | 03/19/06 | Dennis O'Brien
Posted on 03/20/2006 8:36:27 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1599996/posts

ET: The Exoplanet Tracker
spacedaily.com | 01/13/06
Posted on 01/14/2006 11:44:25 AM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1558073/posts

"First Exoplanet" Image Confirmed
Sky & Telescope | May 2, 2005 | Robert Naeye
Posted on 05/07/2005 9:12:52 AM EDT by Lonesome in Massachussets
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1398513/posts

NASA Announces Spitzer Planet Finder Update
NASA | 03/29/06 | Erica Hupp
Posted on 03/29/2006 6:36:14 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1605729/posts

Optical Device Cancels Starlight So Astronomers Can See Distant Planets
University of Arizona | 02/28/06 | Lori Stiles
Posted on 03/01/2006 7:07:08 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1588117/posts

Prof wins NASA grant to study planetary system
University of Delaware | 02/28/06
Posted on 03/01/2006 7:04:23 PM EST by KevinDavis
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1588114/posts


78 posted on 08/04/2006 1:53:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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55 Cancri
by James B. Kaler
The Planet Project
Farthest out, at 5.9 Astronomical Units (AU) from the star, is the most massive, 55 Cnc-d, which is at least 4.1 times the mass of Jupiter and takes 14.7 years to orbit. The other three are much closer and less massive. Next in order are 55 Cnc c, b, and e with minimum masses of 0.21, 0.84, 0.045 solar, orbital radii of 0.24, 0.11, 0.038 AU, and periods of 44, 14.7, and 2.81 days. The existence of 55 Cnc-c is questionable. 55 Cnc-e has the smallest measured minimum mass, only about that of Uranus or Neptune. It is also closest to its parent star, its orbit just 10 percent the size of that of Mercury... 55 Cancri is a mid-sixth magnitude star (magnitude 5.95) class G (G8) dwarf 41 years away. A bit cooler (5280 Kelvin) and carrying only 0.87 of a solar mass, it shines at just 58 percent of the luminosity of the Sun, its radius 0.9 solar.

79 posted on 08/08/2006 10:30:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, July 27, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum
I found this and other links over on ArchaeoBlog, in a characteristically snide piece its author put together regarding the wide open throttle conference on some fringe topics.
Conference on Precession and Ancient Knowledge
Geoff Marcy
Dr. Marcy, Professor of Astronomy at UC Berkeley, is one of the leading astronomers in the world today. His research has focused on the detection of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. His team has discovered 110 extrasolar planets (as of Jan 2006), allowing study of their masses and orbits... He will be going out on the edge of astronomical research and discussing a subject that NASA would like to avoid.
His team's count is now 121, which is more than half of all extrasolar planets discovered to date by everyone combined.
80 posted on 08/11/2006 11:19:27 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, August 10, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Experts' vote could mean demotion for Pluto
Rocky Mountain News | August 12, 2006 | Jim Erickson
Posted on 08/13/2006 8:58:09 PM EDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1683111/posts

Pluto Could Lose Planet Status
PhysOrg.com | 21 June 2006 | Staff
Posted on 06/22/2006 7:11:12 AM EDT by PatrickHenry
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1653562/posts


81 posted on 08/13/2006 6:05:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, August 10, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum
testing, testing...

· X-Planets topics · X-Planets blog view · post · join ping list · bookmark ·

82 posted on 08/19/2006 1:09:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, August 10, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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· X-Planets ping list join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark ·

83 posted on 08/19/2006 1:14:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, August 10, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Keep on truckin Geoff....


84 posted on 08/19/2006 1:15:32 AM PDT by garbageseeker (Wars may be fought by weapons, but they are won by men.- General George Patton)
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To: garbageseeker
One last change:

· X-Planets ping list · join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark ·

85 posted on 08/19/2006 1:25:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Thursday, August 10, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum
the link is dead (the hard drive file was from 1999) but I found a sole surviving copy on the Wayback Machine.
Theory of Periodic Mass Extinctions
Frank R. Ettensohn
quoted by Jason Hanlon
Nemesis has not been found, although Richard A. Muller of the University of California at Berkeley continues to track dim red stars to discover if one of them might be a companion to the sun. Also, evidence of impact (such as iridium-rich clay layers or widespread shocked minerals) has not been found in association with all the major extinctions, as would be predicted by the hypothesis. There is excess iridium at the end-Triassic (208 million years ago) and Late Eocene events, as would be expected if impact occurred then, but no such evidence is seen at other events in the periodic series that have been studied in detail. Hence, we have an empirical observation of periodicity but no new hypotheses that suggest interesting tests. This situation is not conducive to scientific effort or to intellectual curiosity, so interest in the question of periodic extinctions has died down. But not completely: there is an interesting scientific paper on the problem published by M. R. Rampino and B. M. Haggerty in Earth, Moon, and Planets (Vol. 72, Nos. 1-3, pages 441-460; 1996), entitled "The 'Shiva Hypothesis': Impacts, Mass Extinctions, and the Galaxy."

86 posted on 09/02/2006 8:52:05 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Saturday, September 2, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: FairOpinion
Finally, the "Moon Could Become a Planet" hysteria / propaganda has passed down toward the bottom of my search results page. Pluto is a planet, the IAU is neither representational or representative, and its proclamations are non-binding and irrelevant.
Discovery of a Young Planetary-Mass Binary
Ray Jayawardhana
and Valentin D. Ivanov
We have identified a companion to the young planetary-mass brown dwarf Oph 162225-240515. This pair forms a resolved binary consisting of two objects with masses comparable to those of extrasolar giant planets. Several lines of evidence confirm the coevality and youth of the two objects, suggesting that they form a physical binary. Models yield masses of 14 and 7 times the mass of Jupiter for the primary and the secondary object, respectively, at an age of 1 million years. A wide (240–astronomical unit) binary in the ultra-low-mass regime poses a challenge to some popular models of brown dwarf formation.

87 posted on 09/02/2006 9:02:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Saturday, September 2, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; mikrofon

really nice space fantasy art here:
http://www.extrasolar.net/usage.asp

It's the product of the late John Whatmough, an article about whom turned up in the usual extrasolar news search on Google (see below). Must have been alright, he liked Clannad.

World of his own
by Dean Shaloup, Telegraph Staff
Published: Saturday, Sep. 23, 2006
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060923/NEWS01/109230087/-1/sports


88 posted on 09/23/2006 8:25:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (updated my FR profile on Saturday, September 16, 2006. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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X-Plan-ation of the list (and why didn't I think of that before?) -- the X-Planets list is for topics about eXtrasolar discoveries, various planets X in the Solar System, and eXploding planets. Thanks to cgk for taking over the management of the List of Lists:

· Bump List · Old Time Bump List · Ping List Envy -- How big is your Ping List? ·
· List of Ping Lists and Their Keepers #1 · #2 · #3 · #4 · #5 · #6 · SeaMole's Concise List ·


89 posted on 10/03/2006 9:23:35 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (If I had a nut allergy, I'd be outta here. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Given the orbital planes well out of the ecliptic of some of the dwarf planets (Eris, Varuna, Sedna) and failure to find any larger bodies, and a current inability to find anything in the purported Oort Cloud, I wonder if there's a stealthy, dim planet, moving in a retrograde orbit, or in an orbit that is far out of the ecliptic.
Why can the major planets have their satellites moving in direct and retrograde orbits as well?
by Wong Chia-ho
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics
Volume 12, Number 4
April, 1991
Abstract: Now we use the Jacobian integral of circular restricted three-body problem to establish a testing function of the stability of satellites. This method of criterion may be applied to the stability problem of satellites when the six elements of the instantaneous orbit of the satellite with respect to its parent planet are known.

"By means of an electronic computer, we can find the stable region of a satellite with a quasi-circular orbit. The boundary surface of this region is a nearly oblate ellipsoid. The volume of this enclosed space is much smaller than that of binding by Hill surface and that of sphere of action."

As the expressions of relative kinetic energy of a satellite with respect to its parent planet have the same form for the direct as well as the retrograde orbits, they can coexist in the same region at the same time.
Why we have not yet found a retrograde planet in the solar system?
by Wong Chia-ho
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics
Volume 11, Number 5
May, 1990
Abstract: In this paper we use the Jacobian integral of the circular restricted three-body problem to establish a testing function of a moving testing particle when it moves like a planet. This function determines whether or not the particle will stay in a definite region (which may be called stable region, SR). By means of checking with an electronic computer, we can find that the SR of quasicircular orbit of retrograde planet motion is much less than the SR of direct planet motion. It is the reason why the existence of a retrograde planet is very rare.
Harrington and Van Flandern hypothesized an interloper of some sort had disturbed the moon system of Neptune, carrying off one former moon which we now know as Pluto (and nowadays, Charon would have been carried off in the same event). This antedates TVF's "exploding planets" model. If such a deux ex machina event occurred, perhaps it wound up ending its existence in a humungous impact on Uranus, tipping that planet's axis into the ecliptic. :')

After his discovery of Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh did a very thorough job looking for additional Trans-Neptunian planets:
Planet X
by Paul Schlyter
The Nine Planets:
Hypothetical Planets
The third search for Planet X began in April 1927. No progress was made in 1927-1928. In December 1929 a young farmer's boy and amateur astronomer, Clyde Tombaugh from Kansas, was hired to do the search. Tombaugh started his work in April 1929. On January 23 and 29, Tombaugh exposed the pair of plates on which he found Pluto when examining them on February 18. By then Tombaugh had examined hundreds of plate pairs and millions of stars... Tombaugh continued his search another 13 years, and examined the sky from the north celestial pole to 50 deg. south declination, down to magnitude 16-17, sometimes even 18. Tombaugh examined some 90 million images of some 30 million stars over more than 30,000 square degrees on the sky. He found one new globular cluster, 5 new open star clusters, one new supercluster of 1800 galaxies and several new small galaxy clusters, one new comet, about 775 new asteroids -- but no new planet except Pluto. Tombaugh concluded that no unknown planet brighter than magnitude 16.5 did exist -- only a planet in an almost polar orbit and situated near the south celestial pole could have escaped his detection. He could have picked up a Neptune-sized planet at seven times the distance of Pluto, or a Pluto-sized planet out to 60 a.u.

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90 posted on 11/27/2006 9:32:52 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, November 16, 2006 https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; mikrofon; ...
The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia
Jean Schneider
CNRS - Paris Observatory
Established in February 1995
Updated 18 December 2006

91 posted on 12/18/2006 8:55:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Don't bother, I haven't updated my profile since 11/16/06. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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So, farewell planet Earth -- is this the end of the world as we know it?
by Anjana Ahuja
November 13, 2006
If the IAU criteria are applied in their strictest sense we are left with a paltry quartet -- Mercury, Venus, Saturn and Uranus -- and a need for a new mnemonic... This was brought to my attention by Sky & Telescope magazine, whose editor, Richard Fienberg, finds the planetary pandemonium embarrassing. He has penned a passionate and very funny editorial this month about how "the IAU's definition of 'planet' is scientifically questionable, confusingly worded and of extremely limited applicability". His criticisms are many, but the most eye-catching is the idea that the IAU has defined the Earth out of planetary existence. According to the IAU's General Assembly, which met in Prague this year, a celestial body can be called a planet only if a) it is in orbit around the Sun; b) it is round (in other words, is massive enough to be shaped into a ball by its own gravity); and c) it has cleared the neighbourhood around its own orbit... "Our own world is threatened by . . . a host of other near-Earth asteroids whose paths around the Sun intersect ours. By strict application of the IAU's new rules, this means Earth is no longer a planet either. Ditto for Mars, Jupiter and Neptune, all of which are accompanied in orbit by little asteroids. Ridiculous!" ...to describe the new Pluto-less planetary octet: Many Very Egotistical Malcontents Just Screwed Up Nomenclature... Fienberg declares defiantly that "there are no plans to remove Pluto from our Sun, Moon and Planets pages".
Anjana Ahuja

Anjana Ahuja

92 posted on 01/15/2007 8:45:27 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice, they're not." -- John Rummel)
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Two new prototypes, perhaps for different uses:

TITLE
TITLE

93 posted on 01/19/2007 10:34:30 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice, they're not." -- John Rummel)
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More Planets Emerge With Solar System-Like Orbits
National Science Foundation
October 16, 2001
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011016070032.htm

"At least two of the recently detected planets have approximately circular orbits. This characteristic is shared by two planets (one of them the size of Jupiter) previously detected by the same team around 47 Ursae Majoris, a star in the Big Dipper constellation, and one around the star Epsilon Reticulum. The majority of the extrasolar planets found to date are in an elongated, or "eccentric," orbit."

Three new worlds found
Source: cbc
Published: 12 Dec 00 Author: staff
Posted on 12/12/2000 09:32:45 PST by RightWhale
http://www.freerepublic.com/forum/a3a36613d4365.htm

Other Earths: Are They Out There ???
Source: space.com
Published: 23 Jan 01 Author: John G. Watson
Posted on 01/23/2001 14:30:11 PST by RightWhale
http://www.freerepublic.com/forum/a3a6e05f34843.htm


94 posted on 01/28/2007 9:30:19 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice, they're not." -- John Rummel)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; mikrofon; ...
Writing in USA Today, the reprehensible partisan shill Dan Vergano blames NASA's recent work toward a return to the Moon, and to human Mars missions -- both of which are Bush administration priorities -- for the decline in its focus on science.

It has been obvious to everyone that the ISS has been the root cause of NASA's inability to get things done in space, and the ISS has been the indirect cause of the continued expense of the STS. Combined, the ISS and STS gobble up most of NASA's budget.

Meanwhile, the Dhimmicrats, having regained control of both houses of Congress, plan to cut NASA's budget, and I'm sure their man Dan will be coming through with support for that, framed as a necessity brought on by President Bush.
95 posted on 02/04/2007 5:31:54 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Saturday, February 3, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Just a test.


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96 posted on 02/19/2007 6:58:32 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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97 posted on 02/19/2007 7:48:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Astrometric Masses of Extrasolar Planets and Brown Dwarfs
NASA Hubble Space Telescope Daily Report #4307
Tuesday, February 27, 2007
We propose observations with HST/FGS to estimate the astrometric elements {perturbation orbit semi-major axis and inclination} of extra-solar planets orbiting six stars. These companions were originally detected by radial velocity techniques. We have demonstrated that FGS astrometry of even a short segment of reflex motion, when combined with extensive radial velocity information, can yield useful inclination information {McArthur et al. 2004}, allowing us to determine companion masses. Extrasolar planet masses assist in two ongoing research frontiers. First, they provide useful boundary conditions for models of planetary formation and evolution of planetary systems. Second, knowing that a star in fact has a plantary mass companion, increases the value of that system to future extrasolar planet observation missions such as SIM PlanetQuest, TPF, and GAIA.

98 posted on 02/28/2007 8:09:00 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; mikrofon; ...
a figure from "Hunting Distant Dwarfs", part two of a five part transcript of a lecture given by Mike Brown:

Pluto's 248-year long orbit is less circular - more elliptical or "egg-shaped" - than those of the other planets. Pluto's orbit has an eccentricity of 0.25, which means that Pluto's distance from the Sun is as little as 29.7 AU - temporarily bringing it closer to the Sun than Neptune - and as great as 49.7 AU. -- Credit: JHU/APL

Hunting Distant Dwarfs

99 posted on 02/28/2007 8:18:03 AM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Thursday, February 19, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; mikrofon; ...
...and, it's color coordinated with FR...
X-Planets
 
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...IOW, I need to get out of the house.
100 posted on 03/31/2007 9:17:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on Saturday, March 31, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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