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When itís Saturday, the whole world is Jewish
Political Mavens ^ | 27 Sept. 2006 | Rachel Raskin-Zrihen

Posted on 09/27/2006 4:40:08 PM PDT by radar101

Prepare for a seven-day work week, because that’s what we’ll all get if a recently-filed complaint succeeds in sparking change.

If the complaint, filed by the NAACP in New York against a dental clinic there, were to prevail, which I can’t believe it will, the implications for the rest of us are fairly staggering. In fact, I doubt the folks who filed it gave the likely consequences much thought beforehand.

Evidently, the NAACP filed a complaint with the New York state Division of Human Rights, accusing a New York medical and dental clinic of religious discrimination — of imposing its religious beliefs on others — because it’s closed on Saturday, the Jewish Sabbath.

Several points immediately leap to mind.

First, this clinic is a private business and it can close any day or time its owners want as long as this is the same United States of America I woke up in this morning.

Second, I’ll bet a fairly high percentage of those on the filing end of this nonsense would consider it sacrilege to operate a business on Sunday, the Christian Sabbath.

Actually, it seems to me the fact that most U.S. firms and all government offices are closed Sundays is an imposition of Christianity on the entire country.

And it’s not even accurate.

Sunday is the first and not the last day of the week. Check your calendar. The word Saturday means Sabbath day. It was probably a way for the Church to push its weight around that the official Western day of rest changed to Sunday many moons ago. So, if we were to follow this complaint to its natural conclusion, all businesses would have to stay open seven days a week, or only close on random days on which their owners could prove no religious connection.

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KEYWORDS: religion; rights; whine

1 posted on 09/27/2006 4:40:09 PM PDT by radar101
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To: radar101

Chinese restaurants are often closed on Monday. I think its an unconstitutional imposition of Confucianism or Taoism on me.

What a crock. How to resolve the conflict between the 40-hour workweek and the 24/7 service economy?


2 posted on 09/27/2006 4:45:39 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine
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To: Pearls Before Swine

Haircutters are closed on Monday, an obvious attempt to shove a homosexual agenda down our throats.


3 posted on 09/27/2006 4:51:08 PM PDT by thoughtomator (Islam delenda est)
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To: radar101

For all intents and purposes we're living in a secular society. I don't know where the author lives but where I do nearly every business is open on Sundays - not just the big malls but even small retailers. True, many offices are closed but this just means they go to other businesses to spend their money and amuse themselves. Practically speaking, we're all somehow part of a seven day week. Really a 24/7 seven day week!


4 posted on 09/27/2006 5:06:47 PM PDT by T.L.Sink
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To: radar101
My barber is closed on Wednesdays this is obviously an attempt to shove... uh... um... barbarism down my throat.
5 posted on 09/27/2006 5:07:24 PM PDT by CzarNicky (Gentlemen, Dethklok has summoned a troll.)
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To: T.L.Sink
But this lawsuit is trying to force a private business to open when it chooses to be closed. How about Chik-f-a-let(sp?), it is closed on Sunday because it chooses to be. Should I sue to keep it open?
6 posted on 09/27/2006 5:21:46 PM PDT by CremeSaver
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To: CremeSaver

No, and I completely agree that a private enterprise has the right to determine its own hours of operation.


7 posted on 09/27/2006 5:27:27 PM PDT by T.L.Sink
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To: T.L.Sink
LOL! Wow, sorry, I just re-read my post. I didn't realize how harsh I sounded. I'm glad we agree. :O)
8 posted on 09/27/2006 5:34:56 PM PDT by CremeSaver
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To: thoughtomator
Haircutters are closed on Monday, an obvious attempt to shove a homosexual agenda down our throats.

The Post Office is closed on Christmas... an obvious attempt to force the Judeo-Christian agenda on us.

9 posted on 09/27/2006 5:38:16 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine
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To: radar101
Has the NAACP filed any lawsuits against states with blue laws that forbid certain businesses from operating on Sundays? Such laws can make things very difficult for those who worship the Sabbath, since they can't do any shopping at restricted businesses during the weekend.

BTW, in response to "The word Saturday means Sabbath day," I think not. By my understanding, the days of the week are named for the Sun, Moon, and the gods of five planets (though the forms of the names vary in different language):

Sunday Dimanche The Sun (not sure what Dimanche refers to)
Monday Lundi The Moon (la Lune)
Tuesday Mardi Mars (not sure about Tuesday)
Wednesday Mercredi Mercury (not sure about Wednesday)
Thursday Jeudi Thor (Jupiter)
Friday Vendredi Venus (Frida)
Saturday Samdi Saturn
I don't have all the details, but the notion of the Sun, Moon, and five planets seems to fit.
10 posted on 09/27/2006 9:11:50 PM PDT by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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