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U.S. Army orders bridges made of recycled plastic
CNET -- Planetary Gear ^ | November 12, 2009 | Candace Lombardi

Posted on 11/13/2009 3:12:38 AM PST by Willie Green

Axion International Holdings has won a $957,000 contract to provide the U.S. Army with two bridges made from a thermoplastic composite and recycled plastic, the company announced Wednesday evening.

The two bridges, which are replacing old wooden ones, will be constructed at Fort Eustis in Virginia from a proprietary Recycled Structural Composite (RSC) developed by Axion in conjunction with scientists at Rutgers University.

The railroad cross-ties will be made entirely of a plastic composed of recycled materials from both consumer and industrial plastic waste. Axion asserts that its recycled plastic railroad ties are actually longer-lasting that typical creosote-treated wood railroad ties.

Both the 40-foot and 80-foot bridges to be built will each have a high-loading rating of 130 tons, and be used to transport both locomotives and freight traffic, according to Axion.

The location is significant. Fort Eustis is home to the U.S. Army Transportation Corps, the branch of the Army responsible for coordinating the movement of personnel and cargo. The Fort Eustis motto is Einstein's famous quote "Nothing happens, until something moves." It's also the location of the U.S. Army Transportation Museum. But this is not the first military bridge to be made out of plastic by Axion for the military. The Army has previously built plastic bridges for Fort Bragg and Camp Mackall in North Carolina using materials and structural design that allowed for a bearing load of 73 tons for tracked vehicles and 88 tons for cars and trucks. To demonstrate its strength a 70-ton M1A1 Abrams tank was driven across the bridge at its official unveiling in September.

The design and engineering of the bridges is being be done by Parsons Brinckerhoff and Centennial Contractors Enterprises.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Military/Veterans; Science
KEYWORDS: plastic
This military technology should be declassified and made available for civilian use.
1 posted on 11/13/2009 3:12:40 AM PST by Willie Green
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To: Willie Green

Cool. I wonder how the durability of plastic compares to that of treated wood or steel in similar applications? I suspect it’s far greater if my plastic deck is am example.

TC


2 posted on 11/13/2009 3:40:08 AM PST by Pentagon Leatherneck
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To: Pentagon Leatherneck
I would be most concerned in hot/sunny climates where the plastic might crack due to UV degradation.
But I think it's a great idea in colder climates where plastic might be more impervious to ice, snow, road salt and stuff like that...

But who knows???
This is the first I've ever heard of a plastic bridge, yet I'm sure they've already taken into consideration the "usual" concerns we might dream up.
Granted, they're not really big bridges... but I think they could probably be used in countless situations nationwide where the roads have to cross some nameless little gulley or ditch. Pretty cool! Just drop it in place.... easier than concrete pre-fab!!!

3 posted on 11/13/2009 3:52:23 AM PST by Willie Green (Go Pat Go!!!)
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To: Willie Green
First thing I thought of, since it is military...?

How well does it burn?

Cheers!

4 posted on 11/13/2009 4:13:12 AM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: Willie Green
The railroad cross-ties will be made entirely of a plastic composed of recycled materials from both consumer and industrial plastic waste.

I would wonder about the ability of plastic ties to remain in-guage with weather changes. Plastic tends to expand and contract a great deal with temperature changes. If the ties are located on a curve, the last thing you want is flex in the ties when quater-million pound railcars are rounding a bend.

5 posted on 11/13/2009 5:17:41 AM PST by 6SJ7 (atlasShruggedInd: ON)
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