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Store or Starve A beginnerís guide to food storage
nationalexpositor.com ^ | 1/21/10 | Ron Shirtz

Posted on 01/24/2010 7:51:38 AM PST by Kartographer

Store or Starve A beginner’s guide to food storage

Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise.

~ Proverbs 6:6

I want people to store food not only for their sake, but for mine as well. I don’t want to decide which of my kids have to go hungry when you and your unprepared kin come knocking on my door. Contrary to progressive-collectivist thinking, every individual who takes care of themselves and their families benefits society by not becoming a burden. So take responsibility now and start today. Don’t expect the Feds to come by to hand you your ration of government-rationed cheese. You could be in for a long wait. Wait too long, and you may end up with a green-stained mouth from eating grass, like the poor Irish during the potato famine in the mid 1800’s. Or seriously reevaluate your aversion to cannibalism. Compared to those desperate methods, dumpster diving comes off as luxury cuisine.

An adult needs a minimum 2500 calories a day. More if you are physically active. This translates to about two pounds of food, plus a gallon of potable ("drinkable") water. To get started, follow this cardinal rule; Store what you eat, and eat what you store. Do not expect to suddenly acquire a taste for powered eggs or a jalapeno-spiced chili MRE in a long-term disaster. If you have children, they will be even more reluctant to eat such stuff. The next rule is not go into debt by spending thousands of dollars for pre-packaged foodstuffs. It kinda defeats the purpose if you have to eat your food supply because you have no money left after buying it.

Begin building your food storage by buying 2–3 extra items every time you shop at the grocery store. A few cans here, some bags and boxes there, and it will begin to add up. Look for sales, two-for-one specials, and coupon items. Set aside some space, and put the oldest stuff in front, and the newest in back. Rotate from back to front as you use it. If you have food items that are going to expire soon that you don’t have time to eat, donate them to a local food pantry for Karma points. There. You now have established a simple but effective short-term food storage system. Everything from here on will expand upon it.

The next step is to create a larger, stable environment to preserve your food supply over the long haul. Regardless if you live in a country mansion or a studio apartment, you need the following conditions to preserve food:

* Keep it airtight * Keep it cool * Keep it dark * Keep it dry * Keep it protected

Exposure to oxygen degrades food. I’ll cover one method to deal with that later. Temperature is the next concern. The goal is to keep food at 70° or below. For every 10 degrees cooler, food life doubles. Every 10 degrees warmer, it halves it. But at the same time, you want to keep it from freezing. Maintaining a stable and consistent temperature environment is the key. Avoid temperature extremes, like storing food in an unheated, un-insulated garage in a four-season environment. Basements make good root cellars. Real root cellars are even better. For those in suburban homes and apartments, a closet designated as a food pantry will serve. Metal trash cans, plastic tub containers, or buckets all lined with a 4-mil black trash liners will help insulate food from temperature extremes. They will also protect food from sunlight, which destroys nutrients, from moisture, which creates mold, and rodents, who will grow in swarming numbers as modern society falls apart. Buckets can be obtained at bakeries and food delis for free or at little cost. Hard pressed for space in you domicile? Put a trash can full of food in your living room, throw a nice cloth over it, add a lamp, and it doubles as an end table. Make a media center of boards supported by food buckets. Who said food storage isn’t fashionable?

Now back to the oxygen problem. As long as the can does not have a tell-tale bulge, signaling spoiled contents, canned goods are viable for many years past their expiration dates, notwithstanding a loss in nutritional value. Dry food packed in paper, cardboard boxes, or plastic are subject to oxygen spoilage over time. One solution is to repackage dry food items using food grade Mylar bags. These bags are an inexpensive method for those on a budget to customize their food storage to their personal needs and taste. Mylar is an excellent air and moisture barrier. It is said one can jump on a filled sealed bag and it won’t pop. But they need protection against punctures and gnawing vermin—hence they need to be stored in a protective container, like those mentioned above. The recommended base foods for long-term storage are wheat, oats, legumes, pasta, honey/sugar, and salt. These will easily last 20–30 years if packed and stored properly. Flour and dry milk are more finicky, and have a shelf life of only 5–10 years. If you or members of your family suffer from Celiac disease, and cannot consume gluten type foods such as wheat, substitute white rice instead. I do not recommend brown rice for long-term storage, as it contains oils that break down over time that causes it to spoil. Supplement your long term food with canned goods, MRE’s and others sundries. The eventual goal is to build a diverse storage of food for health, variety, and if necessary, portability.

Items needed for packaging food:

Food grade Mylar bags. I recommend minimum 4.5mm thick bags in one-gallon size. These will hold about 4–6 lbs, depending on the bulk of the food products. Besides commercial vendors, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints also sells them online, along with other preparedness supplies. Their bags are 7mm thick. However, they only sell them in bulk, so 250 bags for $94 is probably more bags than you need. The Church also has food canneries throughout the US that sells these in smaller quality. One can purchase pre-packaged food or bring their own food to seal at cost at these centers.

500cc Oxygen absorber packets. It takes two of these for each one gallon, 11" x 13" or similar sized Mylar bags full of food. These packets come in a sealed bag with all the oxygen sucked out. If the bag is not flat, but puffy with air, the oxygen packets have been compromised. You will need a glass jar with a metal (not plastic) lid to store them after you open the bag. Or you can seal them in a Mylar bag. Ordinary plastic bags are no good for storing oxygen packets – they provide a poor air barrier. Oxygen packets will start to feel warm when activated by exposure to air. Take them out only when you have everything else all set to bag and seal. Make sure to close the lid to preserve the others.

5-gram silica gel desiccant. These absorb any residue moisture that may reside in your food, to prevent mold. I’ve talked to the people at our local LDS cannery, and they and others who have stored food for years have experienced no problems not using desiccant packets. Everything I’ve read online suggest you should put them in. Your call. I purchase mine on eBay for around 25 cents each.

Sealer. This is a very expensive piece of equipment. I like to use the one at our local church. Contact the local Bishop or a Mormon friend to arrange a time to use one. It comes with a foot pedal, making it easier to seal bags. An alternative is using a hot iron set on wool or cotton (Not the wife’s!) with a 2 x 4 piece of wood. Some find they can use conventional food sealers. But do your homework well, as it is for good reason that Mylar bags require industrial strength sealers compared to off-the-shelf food sealers.

Directions for sealing bags:

1. If using the LDS Church sealer, check that the settings are at Sealing: 3, Congealing: 6, Recycle: 2. Turn on the sealer and let it warm up for two minutes.

2. (Optional) Place two 5-gram silica gel packets at the bottom of the Mylar bag.

3. Pour flour, rice, grain, etc. in bag. This can be done single-handedly, but from experience, it is so much easier to have someone help holding the Mylar bag, as it is very slick and does not have a flat bottom to keep it upright. Flour and dry milk can be a pain because it "poofs" everywhere when pored in the bag. When it does, use a damp paper towel to clean up the inside of the top of the bags where it will be sealed together. Then apply a dry towel to remove any moisture. At this point, firmly bang the bag several times against the table to help settle the contents and reduce airspace between the food elements.

4. Place two 500cc oxygen packets on top of food. Be sure to keep the unused oxy packets sealed in an airtight container, so they will stay fresh.

5. Hold and pull tight both ends of the open bag, place in the sealer. Let the filled part of the bag drop down, to prevent food from coming up to opening and preventing a perfect seal. Hit the foot pedal. The seal bar will come down for 2–3 seconds to set the seal. I like to add a second seal to each bag for good measure. Check the seal by attempting to peel the opening apart. If the seal is secure, you won’t be able too. Also push on the bag and watch if any air leaks out. None should. For using an iron, place the Mylar bag opening on the 2 x 4, and press down. Some prefer to put a towel between the iron and the Mylar, but I’ve never scorched a bag yet.

6. Use a permanent marker to write the on bag the date, the weight, and the description on the bagged food. I like to include the brand name of the food, in case I have any problems with it, or is recalled by the FDA. For some things like powdered milk, I tape the mixing instructions on the bag.

Mylar bags may be cut in half or smaller to store smaller portions. Filled Mylar bags are very stiff and rigid. The bagged food will be a bit awkward to store in round containers like buckets and trashcans. Stack fragile food like pasta on top of the heavier, bulkier bagged foods. Large Mylar bags from vendors are available to store quantities up to 30 lbs in 5-gallon plastic buckets. Put one in, and fill up with the dry food product of your choice. Some recommend using dry ice on top of the food before sealing to displace oxygen in the bucket. I could not find any dry ice in my area, so put ten oxygen packets on top instead. Seal with a hot iron by pressing the Mylar against a 2 x 4 piece. Trim any excess from the sealed top edge of the bag with scissors to secure the Mylar bag into the bucket. This YouTube video gives excellent demonstration. Cover with a lid. I prefer Gamma screw-top lids on my buckets. They cost from $7–10 each, but are so much easier than popping and hammering lids off and on every time.

Other food storage methods include canning, both traditional glass jars and #10 metal cans. The latter can be done at a local LDS cannery center. Canning butter is very easy to do, without requiring a pressure cooker. DIY canned butter has a self-life up to five years. Dehydrating food is another valuable storage method.

A few more suggestions with building your food storage. Include fun foods to help break the monotony and uplift morale, such as hard candy, chocolate, powdered drinks, and dried fruit. Pick up some recipes on cooking the food you store, to add variety to your diet. When possible, supplement your food storage meals with garden vegetables, home grown sprouts, or ordinary dandelion leaves. Be careful of depending on a diet of MRE’s. While they are portable and convenient for traveling, they are short on fiber, and can be hard on the digestive system, especially with children and the elderly. They also negatively affect those who are gluten intolerant. On storing water, bottled water is okay if you are going to bug out, but for hunkering down, you need to think much bigger. For the cost of two cartons of bottled water, you can purchase a five-gallon water container. These are more practical if you need to go out and get your water replenished. Add half teaspoon of bleach per five gallons to keep it safe. Be sure to use only regular bleach, and not those with special or extra additives. If in doubt, boil it.

Whether a global disaster strikes or one becomes unemployed, food storage is the best insurance one can have in uncertain times. You will garner a better dividend on your food storage than any other investment. There’s more to improve upon than mentioned here, such as progressing to the next level from food storage to food production. But you have enough info to get started. So no more excuses. Get working on your food storage today. And don’t forget the can opener.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Society
KEYWORDS: preppers; shtf; survival; survivalism
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A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences.
Proverbs 27:12
1 posted on 01/24/2010 7:51:39 AM PST by Kartographer
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To: Kartographer

When transport and the supply chain shuts down, there are only 72 hours of the necessities in each grocery store.


2 posted on 01/24/2010 7:54:29 AM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (Prepare for survival.)
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To: Kartographer

Why nothing about eating the neighbors?


3 posted on 01/24/2010 7:55:10 AM PST by cripplecreek (Seniors, the new shovel ready project under socialized medicine.)
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To: Kartographer

bump


4 posted on 01/24/2010 7:56:17 AM PST by Tuscaloosa Goldfinch ( T.G., global warming denier.)
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To: cripplecreek
Why nothing about eating the neighbors?

Why should there be? I mean we have already gotten to a point where that happens and there isn't even a food shortage.

5 posted on 01/24/2010 7:58:06 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Great info for the newbies, a wonderful reminder for us oldsters. Thanks!


6 posted on 01/24/2010 7:58:41 AM PST by kimmie7 (THE CROSS - Today, Tomorrow and Always!)
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To: Kartographer

Well I’m going to keep giving my neighbors stuff from the garden just in case.


7 posted on 01/24/2010 8:00:10 AM PST by cripplecreek (Seniors, the new shovel ready project under socialized medicine.)
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To: cripplecreek

Liberals are uneatable. Just a note. LOL


8 posted on 01/24/2010 8:00:42 AM PST by 70th Division (I love my country but fear my government!)
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To: cripplecreek
Why nothing about eating the neighbors?

Have you seen my neighbors?

9 posted on 01/24/2010 8:01:40 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Kartographer

I couldn’t help but notice that the picture was of the “Snack Center” of the grocery store.

I would like to see a comparison with the dried beans, baking supplies , and canned goods sections :-)

A bag of chips won’t last you too long, but a few canned goods, flour, sugar, & beans could get you through a week. And be much better for you too.

(I cannot understand why so few people know a days can cook, I mean just basic stuff - Wish schools spent more on this & less on “diversity celebration”)


10 posted on 01/24/2010 8:01:55 AM PST by KosmicKitty (WARNING: Hormonally crazed woman ahead!!)
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To: Kartographer

Bump!


11 posted on 01/24/2010 8:03:01 AM PST by Touch Not the Cat
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To: Lurker

My neighbors think I’m generous but I’m just farming.


12 posted on 01/24/2010 8:03:15 AM PST by cripplecreek (Seniors, the new shovel ready project under socialized medicine.)
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To: cripplecreek

“Or seriously reevaluate your aversion to cannibalism.”


13 posted on 01/24/2010 8:04:44 AM PST by Unassuaged (I have shocking data relevant to the conversation!)
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To: cripplecreek

I think that topic is covered in the second half of the SSS (shoot, shove, and shut up) guide under S BBQ SS.


14 posted on 01/24/2010 8:05:23 AM PST by bgill (The framers of the US Constitution established an entire federal government in 18 pages.)
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To: cripplecreek
Well I’m going to keep giving my neighbors stuff from the garden just in case.

Well I suggest you just remember:
Quark: "Let me tell you something about humans, nephew. They're a wonderful, friendly people as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people become as nasty and as violent as the most blood thirsty Klingon."

15 posted on 01/24/2010 8:05:36 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Well my neighbor is heavily armed and that is a concern.


16 posted on 01/24/2010 8:07:15 AM PST by cripplecreek (Seniors, the new shovel ready project under socialized medicine.)
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To: Ghost of Philip Marlowe

You don’t have to be Mormon to take advantage of the Cannery. You just have to can for everyone the day that you go, as well as for yourself.

It is a good deal. 5 Years ago, we used the new mylar to put up a year’s supply of food. We are now using it because one member of our household was laid off. Not only is it saving us money at the grocery store, we paid alot less for it back then.

Putting you money into food storage is the same as putting it into stocks. The only difference is that the prices of food usually only go up.

We also made sure that we could independently live without utilities. We have enough money in coins to buy in cash food and gas etc for a month. We have enough water stored in our swimming pool to not only be used by us but our friends, family and neighbors. It would take very little to make it potable. We have propane to cook with and wood to heat/cook with and a generator to provide lights and power.
We also have a 48 hour kit in a backpack for each person in the house, in case we have to leave our home.
It is a good idea to leave these in your vehicle - if you have two vehicles used equally then divide them into two.

Food storage is a little bit like home owners insurance. The more food storage you have the less likely you will be to have to use it in emergencies.


17 posted on 01/24/2010 8:11:30 AM PST by ODDITHER (HAT)
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To: KosmicKitty
A bag of chips won’t last you too long, but a few canned goods, flour, sugar, & beans could get you through a week.

A fifty pound bag of high protein bread flour is $24.99 at Costco. Those five gallon food grade plastic buckets are free if you know where to ask for them.

If you plan it right you can have 6 months put back in pretty short order.

18 posted on 01/24/2010 8:11:44 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: cripplecreek

Produce Prices On the Rise After Cold Snap

http://wdbo.com/localnews/2010/01/produce-prices-on-the-rise-aft.html


19 posted on 01/24/2010 8:12:17 AM PST by sheikdetailfeather (The dogs barked and the caravans rolled on!)
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To: Kartographer

For those of us who are medicine dependent, I’d like to see some pointers on medicine storage. I’ve already delved into the food and herbal meds, but would like to have a nice Rx backup first.


20 posted on 01/24/2010 8:13:32 AM PST by kimmie7 (THE CROSS - Today, Tomorrow and Always!)
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To: sheikdetailfeather

Ive gotten to know the owners of a small vegetable farm and roadside stand near here.


21 posted on 01/24/2010 8:15:14 AM PST by cripplecreek (Seniors, the new shovel ready project under socialized medicine.)
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To: Kartographer

I have plumbed in a 300 gallon pressure vessel just ahead of my hot water heater. Kind of a big bulge in my water supply. The water is fresh daily and should we ever lose municipal water, I’d have this 300 gallons plus my hot water heater.


22 posted on 01/24/2010 8:17:10 AM PST by umgud (I couldn't understand why the ball kept getting bigger......... then it hit me.)
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To: cripplecreek
You need the right recipe. Take one liberal, soak for 5 hours in heavily salted water to remove gamey taste. Insert spit and rotate over hot coals. Discard all jewelry (pay special attention to the tongue) and cook until tender. Beware that after consuming same you may die of an upset stomach.
23 posted on 01/24/2010 8:21:03 AM PST by JPG (Mr. Gore, we have a warrant for your arrest...put your hands behind your back.)
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To: Kartographer

ping for later read


24 posted on 01/24/2010 8:24:17 AM PST by diamond6 (Expose Planned Parenthood: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYaTywSDmls)
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To: Kartographer

Bookmark for later.


25 posted on 01/24/2010 8:27:32 AM PST by arkady_renko
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To: Lurker
Yes, think about it for a minute:

10 oz. bag of chips: $3.29.

1 lb. (16 oz.) lentils $.79 (if you do a little searching; otherwise you pay $1.69/lb. like the rest of the yuppies do).

To the supposed 47% of the country that still approves of Obambi - nevermind.

26 posted on 01/24/2010 8:29:45 AM PST by elk
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To: kimmie7
Most antibiotics will keep for 3 to 5 years if they're refrigerated.

L

27 posted on 01/24/2010 8:32:00 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Kartographer; All

In the Communist Ukrainian massacres, they tortured or shot folks who looked too healthy...claiming that they were hording and hiding grains and food stuffs.

We need to learn and know one another again, so that we can band together and defend one another. Storing and preparing is good. The Psalms(as quoted by the post) say “consider the ants...”. Ant colonies also defend themselves as well as store their food, they will swarm out in great numbers to attack threats...some species more viciously than others.

So indeed we should “Consider the ants.....”, in matters of preparation and defense!


28 posted on 01/24/2010 8:32:45 AM PST by mdmathis6
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To: ODDITHER

You’re preaching to the choir. But they are all good ideas.

It’s important to get buy-in from every member of the family. If a family member doesn’t see the importance, you will be fighting upstream to do what is wise.


29 posted on 01/24/2010 8:42:06 AM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (Prepare for survival.)
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To: cripplecreek
Ive gotten to know the owners of a small vegetable farm and roadside stand near here.

Might be a good idea. Then again...

I belong to an eclectic group of bikers. Cruisers, sports, dual, conservative, liberal, Christian, Jew, Hindu and agnostic. Our only similarity is that we love to ride together but I count them as some of my best friends. Several weeks ago we were having our usual Thursday night dinner together and the subject turned to survival.

Most of us, the conservative ones, have an ample supply of food and arms. One of the liberals of the group said 'guess I know where to go when the trouble starts'. My response shocked him to speechlessness.

I bluntly told him 'If you come to my house, and you don't bring enough to keep you and your family alive and safe, you had best get used to calling me massa. Because you and yours will be nothing more than a slave while you are there. Your skills as a programmer will mean nothing, your ability to tell interesting stories will mean nothing, your wife's stupid whining will mean nothing. You and your family will mean another mouth to feed and another soul to defend. I don't have the resources or the give a shit to let you take food from the mouths of my family. You will either work as a slave to earn you keep or your will move on.'

At that time all of the 'prepared' people echoed my thoughts while the 'unprepared' were thinking over the prospects. The unprepared begin asking very good questions on how they should proceed to be 'prepared'. If nothing else my statement saved me a possibly awkward moment in the future and may have just saved four other families due to lack of preparedness.

Moral to the story 'Better to be prepared than to be my slave'. Hope the local farmer has a more Christian attitude then I do. Second moral 'Local farmers are great to barter with, make sure you have something he doesn't'.

30 posted on 01/24/2010 8:43:48 AM PST by 11Bush
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To: Kartographer

Here is one of the better sites for bying food already in airtight containers

http://www.waltonfeed.com/


31 posted on 01/24/2010 8:46:45 AM PST by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: Lurker
Living in rural Alaska, we have had a 3 year supply of food as long as I can remember. Our road closes every Oct and don't open until April; being 600 miles from nearest Costco, food prices quadruple at local pop store.

Flour, cereal, meal will all go wormy come spring when it warms up. We go thru 500 lbs flour /year. I store 50 lb bags outside in shed in ice chests (stays below zero 4-6 months) then around march i put the bags in outside freezer as they are half empty by then anyway. Something about the warm up in spring that sets the eggs in all flour to hatch. I lost 150 lbs of flour several years back when I didn't do this.

WE put in 300 lb yukon golds every May (always get 2500 lbs which we spread around the community)and usually plant 2 lb of carrot seed (pellet seed). Wifey usually freezes 75 gallon bags of carrots; great with moose, caribou stew all winter. Bottomline, nothing like new taters.

32 posted on 01/24/2010 8:47:00 AM PST by Eska
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To: Kartographer

Ping to myself.


33 posted on 01/24/2010 8:53:15 AM PST by Tucker822
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To: ODDITHER
“You don’t have to be Mormon to take advantage of the Cannery. You just have to can for everyone the day that you go, as well as for yourself.”

I did this once LOVED it. A lot of fun and Mormon's are good people! But I was given to understand it was a one time invite and I had to have a sponsor. I would love to go back again.

34 posted on 01/24/2010 8:53:53 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Bookmarked for future reference.

Great post!


35 posted on 01/24/2010 8:55:01 AM PST by airborne
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To: Drango

Here’s some sites I recommend:

http://www.aaoobfoods.com/welcome.html

http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront

http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/

http://www.survivalistboards.com/

http://whenshtf.com/

For starters read this post on this site:

http://whenshtf.com/showthread.php?t=9059

Read:

http://baconreport.blogspot.com/2007/07/top-100-items-to-disappear-first-during.html


36 posted on 01/24/2010 8:59:22 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Ghost of Philip Marlowe
When transport and the supply chain shuts down, there are only 72 hours of the necessities in each grocery store.

Thats under "Normal" conditions. The conditions where everyone goes to the store as usual, and buys what the want or need at the time.

In the event of an emergency, it would be maybe a few hours.

37 posted on 01/24/2010 9:00:16 AM PST by mountn man (The pleasure you get from life, is equal to the attitude you put into it.)
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To: Kartographer
"Contrary to progressive-collectivist thinking, every individual who takes care of themselves and their families benefits society by not becoming a burden.

I would love to see this quoted by all candidates seeking to become "Tea Party Approved".

"Every individual who takes care of themselves and their families benefits society by not becoming a burden!"

38 posted on 01/24/2010 9:00:46 AM PST by LZ_Bayonet (There's Always Something.............And there's always something worse!)
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To: Kartographer

bump


39 posted on 01/24/2010 9:12:24 AM PST by GOPJ (Happy Anniversary Barack! - - - Love, Massachusetts - - - FreeperGOPsterinMA)
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To: 11Bush
I've had the same conversation with a couple of friends. Shocked them right good, it did.

Now they're busy as little beavers.

40 posted on 01/24/2010 9:21:15 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Kartographer

bookmarking for reference. Thanks!


41 posted on 01/24/2010 9:25:06 AM PST by VRWCer (¬ďSocialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, W Churchill)
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To: Kartographer

America’s Impending Master Class Dictatorship
(a “must read” if only for the stats)

Prepare for your day to be ruined by the terrifying facts presented in this article, but it’s time to face the truth...

Tragically, the truth is that the more well-prepared a person is when the system collapses, the bigger the target on their back will be.

There is no question in my mind that the gov’t will not hesitate for a nano-second to “appropriate” all food, guns, meds, etc from those who are being “selfish” and hoarding those items when they are so many “less fortunate” families “in need”.

We have heard these code words so many times over the years that most Americans have been numbed to just how evil the concept of “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” really is.

It’s the exact same logic that they use when they defend the progressive tax code (aka: legalized theft). Those who work hard and earn more than they “need” are forced to give half of their income to those who have not been as “fortunate”.

They steal half of our earnings now and they will not hesitate to steal our food, guns, meds, etc when the time comes.

http://www.kitco.com/ind/Dougherty/jan222010.html


42 posted on 01/24/2010 9:25:53 AM PST by Painesright
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To: Calm_Cool_and_Elected

ping


43 posted on 01/24/2010 9:26:46 AM PST by Calm_Cool_and_Elected
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To: Calm_Cool_and_Elected

ping


44 posted on 01/24/2010 9:27:50 AM PST by Calm_Cool_and_Elected
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To: Kartographer; nw_arizona_granny; ~Kim4VRWC's~; alwaysconservative; AngieGal; annieokie; ansel12; ...
PING

Store or Starve A beginner’s guide to food storage

A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences. Proverbs 27:12

45 posted on 01/24/2010 9:28:15 AM PST by DelaWhere (Better to be prepared a year too early than a day too late.)
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To: cripplecreek

Why nothing about eating the neighbors?

I think the proper way to do that is to feed him to the ferrets.
Then eat the ferrets..


46 posted on 01/24/2010 9:29:00 AM PST by djf (The one thing we know is how much we don't know!)
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To: Kartographer; fieldmarshaldj
and rodents, who will grow in swarming numbers as modern society falls apart.

Well, we already have a major Rat infestation in the Federal District of Columbia, and modern society is most definitely falling apart.

;-)

47 posted on 01/24/2010 9:33:36 AM PST by rabscuttle385 (Purge the RINOs! * http://restoretheconstitution.ning.com/)
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To: Kartographer

Thanks for posting this. I’m getting ready to teach a food storage class here in Phoenix, and this article may give me some ideas.


48 posted on 01/24/2010 9:45:25 AM PST by ChocChipCookie (God to Obama: Don't think I'm not keepin' track. Brother.)
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To: 11Bush

Good story, and no doubt true.

I wonder how many people the country could support if the supply chains broke down... 40 50 60 million?

Even at the high end of 60 million, that means right off we’re talking about 4 out of 5 of the people you know being casualties.

It would be quite a wake up call. I mean we can all put signs around saying “Looters will be shot on sight”, but how do you explain that to the woman down the street when you just put a .308 through her 16 year old son? OR daughter?

Keeping things going and keeping the folks with the skills to build things alive would be the number one priority.
Until the harvests start, because that’s it folks, we are farmers now!


49 posted on 01/24/2010 9:46:41 AM PST by djf (The one thing we know is how much we don't know!)
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To: djf
"It would be quite a wake up call. I mean we can all put signs around saying “Looters will be shot on sight”, but how do you explain that to the woman down the street when you just put a .308 through her 16 year old son? OR daughter?"

What about when they show up on your doorstep with straving little ones? That's one of my nightmares and one that could cause my downfall.
50 posted on 01/24/2010 9:52:10 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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