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Scotch-Irish Appalachian Vocabulary Quiz No. 2
Backcountry Notes ^ | April 5, 2010 | Jay Henderson

Posted on 04/05/2010 8:33:37 AM PDT by jay1949

Here's the challenge: certain words and phrases characteristic of Appalachian English in eastern Tennessee and elsewhere can be traced back to Scottish English. Some of these are disappearing; others have spread throughout the South; a few seem to be making it into widespread usage. How many do you know? 1. backset; 2. let on; 3. bonny-clabber; 4. palings; 5. redd up; 6. creel; 7. kindling; 8. hull; 9. nicker; 10. whenever. (I knew 5 of the 10, so that makes me 'bout half smart . . .)

(Excerpt) Read more at backcountrynotes.com ...


TOPICS: History; Society
KEYWORDS: appalachia; appalachian; dialect; rural; vocabulary

1 posted on 04/05/2010 8:33:38 AM PDT by jay1949
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To: stefanbatory; SunkenCiv

*ping*


2 posted on 04/05/2010 8:35:17 AM PDT by hennie pennie
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To: jay1949

2. let on

4. palings

7. kindling

8. hull

9. nicker

10. whenever


3 posted on 04/05/2010 8:36:05 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: jay1949

In Pittsburgh we say “redd up.” Kindling is also not unknown here. The others? Never heard of them. Thanks for the thread.


4 posted on 04/05/2010 8:36:48 AM PDT by PghBaldy (Like the Ft Hood Killer, James Earl Ray was just stressed when he killed MLK Jr.)
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To: cva66snipe

*ping*


5 posted on 04/05/2010 8:40:37 AM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Amber Lamps !"~~)
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To: jay1949

No Bic.


6 posted on 04/05/2010 8:40:43 AM PDT by rahbert (I snap my fingers at the foeman's taunts..")
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To: jay1949

yonder


7 posted on 04/05/2010 8:43:18 AM PDT by kamikaze2000 (You can lead a liberal to truth, but you can't make him think.)
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To: PghBaldy

I don’t see how half of them are Appalachian English. Words and phrases like “to let on,” “kindling,” “hull,” are just basic English, many of them older than the settlement of the Appalachian.


8 posted on 04/05/2010 8:43:28 AM PDT by dangus (Democrats (and McCain-bots): People retardants.)
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To: jay1949

bookmark


9 posted on 04/05/2010 8:44:47 AM PDT by GOP Poet (Obama is an OLYMPIC failure.)
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To: jay1949

I got 8 out of 10. :)


10 posted on 04/05/2010 8:45:07 AM PDT by Library Lady
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To: jay1949
#5: "redd up"

That's when you finish the newspaper.

11 posted on 04/05/2010 8:54:22 AM PDT by Zuben Elgenubi
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To: jay1949

Words I learned in Scranton that are NOT standard English:

“Up the ein-in” (North)
“Haynuh” (”Ain’t it?”)
“buddy me” (accompany)
“Corpse House” (funeral house)
“Fire Barn” (fire house)
“Haynuh left, Haynuh posta” (prohibited)
“upposta” (required to)
“artics” (winter boots, from “arctic”)
“Aunt Sally” (toilet, from “Salle du bain”, French for ‘bathroom’?)
“ate up” (satiated hunger)
“burny” (hot)
“hook me up” (get some for me)
“youze” (y’all)
“wrecked into” (crashed into)
“ver-shtay” (Understand, probably from Pennsylvania Dutch (German))
“mulligrub” (tadpole)


12 posted on 04/05/2010 9:00:24 AM PDT by dangus
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To: PghBaldy

Yins’ll redd up the hahs before company comes, then go down to the Sahside fer a chipped ham sammitch.


13 posted on 04/05/2010 9:01:22 AM PDT by eCSMaster
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To: jay1949

hull?
I thought it would have been shucked, e.g., we shucked some peas to cook for dinner.


14 posted on 04/05/2010 9:12:05 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Ask not what's happening to your money.)
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To: jay1949

Here’s another, “hippins”.


15 posted on 04/05/2010 9:12:34 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: jay1949
Fiest....small rat terrier type dog. Old Scotch term for a small rat terrier which the term has been in use for over three hundred years. I encounter clients from the NE and West Coast that have no idea of the term. Bandy legged fiest is a pejorative term for a skinny legged individual that possesses a difficult personality.
16 posted on 04/05/2010 9:25:20 AM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: vetvetdoug
Bandy legged fiest

Maybe Dr James David Manning can use this term as well as "long-legged Mack Daddy."
17 posted on 04/05/2010 9:40:14 AM PDT by HighlyOpinionated (SPEAK UP REPUBLICANS, WE CAN'T HEAR YOU YET! IMPEACH OBAMA!)
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To: dangus

“I don’t see how half of them are Appalachian English. Words and phrases like “to let on,” “kindling,” “hull,” are just basic English, many of them older than the settlement of the Appalachian.”
I think that is precisely the point. The idiomatic language of the Scots Irish originated in Britain and was brought to America with the settlement of the Irish Protestants in the Appalachian area of the US. The words themselves are old English or as in the case of a word like “kindling” are of Nordic etymology. The isolation of mountain people allowed them to hang onto the original language much longer than the rest of the USA.


18 posted on 04/05/2010 9:42:20 AM PDT by sueuprising
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To: sueuprising

My point is: since when did the rest of the USA lose words like “hull,” “kindling,” etc.?


19 posted on 04/05/2010 1:19:30 PM PDT by dangus
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To: jay1949

Another interesting word of Scottish origin that I encounter from time to time is “chimbley” for “chimney”.

Several colloquialisms for rural southerners come from the Scots well:

Hillbilly - from the casual term for a follower of King William III of Orange in the 17th century. This is the William of “William and Mary” who fought the return of Catholic rule to England.

Redneck - supporters of the National Covenant of 1638 declared that Scotland embraced democratic church governance and rejected the Church of England. Some signed in blood and wore a red kerchief around their necks.

Cracker - from crac, crack, craic, kracken; a word that goes way back at least as far as Old High German, passed to Anglo-Saxon, to Old English, to Gaelic. Across the ocean crack has come to mean “good times” including friends, merriment, music, food and drink. As a pejorative the meaning of cracker leans toward someone who is a boastful, frivolous, liar.


20 posted on 04/05/2010 3:34:42 PM PDT by concentric circles
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To: concentric circles

“Redneck - supporters of the National Covenant of 1638 declared that Scotland embraced democratic church governance and rejected the Church of England. Some signed in blood and wore a red kerchief around their necks”
This may have historical veracity, but I think the use of the word, “redneck” comes from the red bananas miners used in the coal mines of Appalachia.


21 posted on 04/05/2010 4:11:51 PM PDT by sueuprising
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To: sueuprising

The problem with the miner’s etymology is that it refers to declarations of union loyalty by miners in the early 20th century while the use of “redneck” for working class southerners far predates that period.


22 posted on 04/05/2010 4:47:07 PM PDT by concentric circles
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To: concentric circles

“The problem with the miner’s etymology is that it refers to declarations of union loyalty by miners in the early 20th century while the use of “redneck” for working class southerners far predates that period.”
I am not sure how far this term predates the miner’s description. I would think that during the Civil War, if the term redneck was in use, it would have been bandied about by the Union army as an insult to the Confederates. But I have never seen that term used in any Civil War writings. It may have evolved from a later 19th century usage focusing on the fact that many rural southerners literally had rednecks from working out in the hot sun. I have to look this one up. It is interesting.


23 posted on 04/05/2010 8:21:44 PM PDT by sueuprising
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To: jay1949

I knew 7.


24 posted on 04/05/2010 8:29:33 PM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: hennie pennie

Thanks hennie pennie.


25 posted on 04/05/2010 8:42:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: kalee

I scored “5” on each quiz — I guess I could have cheated and picked more words that I did know, but what fun would that be? So far I haven’t heard from anyone claiming to have gotten them all.


26 posted on 04/05/2010 9:01:50 PM PDT by jay1949 (Work is the curse of the blogging class)
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To: concentric circles

Where I live I hear the word “chimly” for “chimney.” “Chimly” shows up in the poetry of Robert Burns — definitely a Scottish origin.


27 posted on 04/05/2010 9:04:02 PM PDT by jay1949 (Work is the curse of the blogging class)
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To: jay1949

My grandfather from Rockingham County Va died in 2000 at age 100.
He used many of those and more. I would like to see the 1st test. :)


28 posted on 04/06/2010 5:35:14 AM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: eCSMaster

LOL


29 posted on 04/06/2010 6:51:55 AM PDT by PghBaldy (Like the Ft Hood Killer, James Earl Ray was just stressed when he killed MLK Jr.)
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To: dangus

Some of the definitions seemed different from what I know, but you might be right.


30 posted on 04/06/2010 6:52:36 AM PDT by PghBaldy (Like the Ft Hood Killer, James Earl Ray was just stressed when he killed MLK Jr.)
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To: kalee

Here ‘tis: http://www.backcountrynotes.com/society-and-culture/2010/3/29/scotch-irish-appalachian-vocabulary-quiz.html


31 posted on 04/06/2010 7:08:26 AM PDT by jay1949 (Work is the curse of the blogging class)
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To: jay1949

bump for later


32 posted on 04/06/2010 7:14:01 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: jay1949

Thanks. I got 7 of those too.


33 posted on 04/06/2010 2:21:27 PM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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