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Transfer Tax?
Accuracy in Academia ^ | May 21, 2010 | Bethany Stotts

Posted on 05/21/2010 7:57:19 AM PDT by bs9021

Transfer Tax?

Bethany Stotts, May 21, 2010

Alleging waste and a “transfer tax” in higher education, Peter P. Smith argues in the most recent Education Outlook that America should establish a “National, ‘Student-Facing’ Course Database and Transfer Information System” for postsecondary transfer students, and “Automate” the “Processing and Evaluation of Transfer Credits” in order to decrease the number of students who get sidetracked from graduating.

In addition to these two reforms, Smith also suggests that higher education should “Create agreements among Colleges that Streamline the Transfer Process,” “Improve the Management and Quality of Postsecondary Data for the Administration of Credit Transfers,” and “Create an Interstate Database of Current Course Equivalencies.”

“If we are to promote the economic well-being of the nation by raising completion rates and producing a twenty-first-century labor force, we must rethink the transfer system to better reflect the needs and circumstances of students,” writes Smith.

Smith outlined how he saw the course database as potentially benefiting transfer students. “Take, for instance, a student who has completed one of the basic prerequisites to a business degree, Accounting 1, but is interested in transferring to a different school,” he writes in the May American Enterprise Institute (AEI) publication. “Using a web-based national course atlas, the student could find and compare all Accounting 2 courses, look at their outcomes, determine his readiness by comparing the outcomes of the course he took with those of the receiving college, and even select a target college to which he wants to transfer.”

Arguably, easing the process by which students can transfer between postsecondary institutions increases market competition among education providers. “Today, postsecondary-education institutions, systems, and even some states are reluctant to address how academic-credit portability could be managed via methods outside of their control,” asserts Smith....

(Excerpt) Read more at academia.org ...


TOPICS: Education; Government; Politics; Society
KEYWORDS: aei; education; highered; transferstudents

1 posted on 05/21/2010 7:57:19 AM PDT by bs9021
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To: bs9021

this would be good. if it hadn’t been suck a debacle transferring colleges i wouldn’t have had to take my first year twice.


2 posted on 05/21/2010 8:02:34 AM PDT by absolootezer0 (2x divorced, tattooed, pierced, harley hatin, meghan mccain luvin', smoker and pit bull owner..what?)
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To: bs9021

Sounds to me as if someone said “There ought to be a law” and Biggie Guvmint jumped right in and said, “yeah, and we can make money off of it.”

How about making Students responsible for their own futures.

How about encouraging colleges to use more “online classes” for classes that do not need “hands on” instruction and making those classes “standardized” nationally?

We do not need another “tax” ~~ my niece went to UDel for a year and none of her classes transferred. Period. To ANY other college. She didn’t use her head and she didn’t go to a school guidance counselor to ask about what courses she should take.

Personal responsibility trumps one more law that’s going to cost taxpayers and college students more than it’s worth.


3 posted on 05/21/2010 8:10:50 AM PDT by HighlyOpinionated (SPEAK UP REPUBLICANS, WE CAN'T HEAR YOU YET! IMPEACH OBAMA!)
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To: bs9021

a new way to tax students,just what we need. there are such agreements in place now. we don’t need more gov. interference in education but less!


4 posted on 05/21/2010 8:26:08 AM PDT by mtnjimmi ("The government is best which governs least." -- Thomas Jefferson)
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To: HighlyOpinionated
It's not that simple. Schools are "accredited" by various private agencies. Colleges that have different accreditation don't have to accept courses from one with lower rating.

Colleges jump through hoops to get the accreditations they want. It's all a great big scheme - just like almost everything else in the U.S.

Go here for an overview...

Colleges are a scam in that they are now an industry and no longer, in my opinion, what they started out to be. There are billions of dollars invested in the continuance of getting new customers (students) every year.

5 posted on 05/21/2010 8:31:05 AM PDT by raybbr (Someone who invades another country is NOT an immigrant - illegal or otherwise.)
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