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Sour Mash to Bourbon to Mint Julep
Backcountry Notes ^ | August 2, 2010 | Jay Henderson

Posted on 08/02/2010 6:01:23 AM PDT by jay1949

Kentucky settlers brought with them the craft of making whiskey, substituting corn for other grain ingredients. Raw whiskey distilled from corn mash has a good deal of, shall we say, character, and some distillers decided to take the time to make a mellower product. Early Kentucky distillers used new oak casks which had been charred on the inside, aging the whiskey from two to six years before decanting into jugs for sale. This resulted in a superior product which eventually became the hard liquor of choice for Americans. We know it as "Bourbon."

(Excerpt) Read more at backcountrynotes.com ...


TOPICS: Food; History; Society
KEYWORDS: alcohol; bourbon; julep; mash; whiskey

1 posted on 08/02/2010 6:01:26 AM PDT by jay1949
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To: jay1949
Only the BEST


2 posted on 08/02/2010 6:07:36 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Cletus.D.Yokel; Charles Henrickson; lightman

Ping!


3 posted on 08/02/2010 6:07:46 AM PDT by bcsco (First there was Slick Willie. Now there's "Oil Slick" Barry...)
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To: jay1949

My bourbon of choice is Woodford Reserve.


4 posted on 08/02/2010 6:10:42 AM PDT by centurion316
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To: jay1949

5 posted on 08/02/2010 6:10:56 AM PDT by tx_eggman (Liberalism is only possible in that moment when a man chooses Barabas over Christ.)
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To: tx_eggman

Bourbon makes my teeth hurt.


6 posted on 08/02/2010 6:17:48 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Impeachment !)
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To: jay1949
Where did Kentuckians come from (for the most part).

I have always wondered because bourbon has such a different flavor than Irish Whiskey or Scotch Whisky (both of which I love--have never cared for bourbon).

Is it the corn in bourbon that gives it such a different taste? Do no Kentucky distillers use barley?

7 posted on 08/02/2010 6:18:53 AM PDT by SonOfDarkSkies (Satan's greatest trick use to be convincing men he doesn't exist! But his latest novelty is Obama!)
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To: centurion316

Woodford Reserve is at the top of my list as well.


8 posted on 08/02/2010 6:19:17 AM PDT by AL932
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To: jay1949; alarm rider; stump56; bcsco; PJ-Comix; kimmie7; MissDairyGoodnessVT; Paul Heinzman; ...

Bourbon ping.


9 posted on 08/02/2010 6:21:42 AM PDT by Cletus.D.Yokel (FreepMail me if you want on the Bourbon Ping List.)
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To: jay1949

My 5th great granduncle was Elijah Craig - some a little duplicative:

Located just north of the crossroads of I-75 and I-64, Georgetown and Scott County are ideally located 10 miles north of Lexington, the Horse Capital of the World. For Canadian travelers Georgetown is just one days drive. Georgetown was founded in 1790 by the Baptist minister Elijah Craig. The Reverend Craig is perhaps best known for his world famous invention, bourbon whiskey.

In 1784, Elijah Craig (1743-1808), an idealistic Baptist preacher from Spotsylvania County, Virginia, incorporated the town of Lebanon near the site of McClelland’s Fort in the Virginia legislature. In 1790, the town’s name was changed to George Town in honor of President George Washington. And in 1792 it became George Town, Kentucky, when Kentucky became the15th state of the union.

Craig is credited by some with the establishment of “the first classical school in Kentucky, the first saw and grist mill, the first fulling and paper mill, and the first ropewalk. Others affirm that he also produced the first bourbon whiskey. In the December 27, 1787, edition of the Kentucky Gazette Craig advertised for fifty or sixty scholars to study at an academy that would open on January 28, 1788 “in Lebanon town,” and would offer courses in Latin, Greek, and “such branches of the sciences as are usually taught in public seminaries.” Ten years later the school was absorbed by the Rittenhouse Academy, which was given by the state some 5,900 acres in Christian and Cumberland counties so that they might sell the land to benefit their endowment fund. The academy, in turn, was absorbed by Georgetown College in 1829.

© Jerry Richardson

Notes
Data from “THE KENTUCKY GAZETTE 1801-1820”, Rev. ELIJAH CRAIG of
Georgetown died Wednesday 18 May 1808. He was one of the 1st settlers in
KY., and erected the 1st paper mill.
Rev. Elijah Craig was an eminent pioneer preacher of Virginia and Kentucky, and brother of the famous Lewis Craig, was born in Orange Co.,Virginia about the year 1743. He was awakened to a knowledge of his lost estate under the preaching of the renowned David Thomas, in 1764. Next
year he was encouraged by Samuel Harris to hold meetings among his neighbors. This he did, using his tobacco-bvarn for a meeting house.
Many were converted.
In 1766, Mr. Craig went to North Carolina, to get James Read to come and baptize him and others. He was ordained in May, 1771, at which time he became pastor of Blue Run church. Some time after this he was imprisoned for preaching the gospel. In jail he lived on rye bread and water, and
preached to the people through the prison bars. He remained in Culpepper jail one month. After this “he was honored with a term in Orange Jail.”
He became one of the most useful and popular preachers in Virginia. He was several times sent as a delegate from the General Association to the Virginia Legislature, to aid in securing religious liberty. In 1786 he removed to Scott Co., Kentucky. After this he labored but little in the
ministry. Being a good business man, he soon amassed a fortune, and was of great value to the new country. He established the first school in which the classics were taught, built the first rope-walk, the first fulling-mill,
and the first paper-mill that existed in Kentucky. He died in 1808.

From “THE KENTUCKY BEVERAGE JOURNAL” January 1993 issue: The durable claim that Elijah Craig, a Baptist minister, made the first Bourbon Whiskey can be traced to Richard Collins, whose “History of Kentucky” was published in 1874. Collins doesn’t identify Craig by name, but writes that “the first Bourbon Whiskey was made in 1789, at Georgetown, at the
fulling mill at the Royal spring.” This statement is on a densely-packed page of assorted Kentucky “firsts.” Collins doesn’t substantiate his claim nor is there any other evidence to support it. Craig was a real person and he was a distiller, there is just no evidence that his whiskey
was unique in its day. Reverend Craig, however, was a unique individual. He and his congregation were chased out of Virginia for religious reasons so he established Lebanon Town, in Kentucky, in 1786. In 1787, Craig founded a
school that is now Kentucky’s Georgetown College. In 1789, he established Kentucky’s first fulling mill (for making cloth). A year later, the name of Lebanon Town was changed to Georgetown to honor George Washington. In 1793, Craig opened Kentucky’s first paper plant. In 1795, he started a shipping business on the Kentucky River.

On September 26, 1798, he was found guilty of making whiskey without a license (so were 177 of his neighbors) and fined $140. Was Elijah Craig Kentucky’s first Bourbon-maker? Maybe not. Was he Kentucky’s first big time entrepreneur? Absolutely!

Corn spirits were made as early as 1746, and a distillery was established in Bourbon County in 1783. Elijah Craig is often credited with development of the distinctive taste of bourbon. Craig, a Baptist minister from Royal Springs, Virginia (now named Georgetown, Kentucky) began making his spirits in 1789. It was Dr James C. Crow, a physician and chemist, who introduced the scientific methodology and quality control to Kentucky whiskey making in the 1820s. He also introduced the sour-mash distilling process. At first it was called “corn whiskey”, but by the middle of the 19th century it was so associated with Bourbon County, Kentucky, that it was called “bourbon”, or “Kentucky bourbon”. There are currently thirteen distilleries in Kentucky, making nearly 80% of the world’s supply of bourbon, with the remaining produced in Tennessee, Virginia, and Missouri.

An article which appeared in Cigar Aficionado, Autumn 1993, The Spirits of Kentucky: Small-Batch and Single-Barrel Bourbons Revive the Good Old Days of Whiskey by Mark Vaughan, includes: “The process of charring barrels originated with Elijah Craig, an eighteenth-century minister and distiller from Georgetown, Kentucky. Craig ‘discovered’ charring when several barrels he was preparing for transportation to market caught fire. The fire may have been set on purpose, in which case it is likely that Craig was trying to find a way to recycle barrels that had been used to ship dried fish. If the conflagration was accident, it was probably caused by a fire in Craig’s own cooperage.”

‘Either way,’ says Samuels, ‘being a good Scotsman, he didn’t want to throw any barrels away. So he filled them with white lightning, by the time he got it all down river to market in New Orleans, with all the sloshing and such, the whiskey had this nice amber color.


10 posted on 08/02/2010 6:26:21 AM PDT by Mercat
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To: Cletus.D.Yokel

Liquor store doesn’t open for another hour and a half :(


11 posted on 08/02/2010 6:26:52 AM PDT by txhurl
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To: SonOfDarkSkies
Where did Kentuckians come from (for the most part).

I think they came from Ireland durring some sort of revolution. I know the mountain people in East Tennessee did.

12 posted on 08/02/2010 6:30:23 AM PDT by beckysueb (January 20, 2013. When Obama becomes just a skidmark on the panties of American history.)
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To: jay1949
To paraphrase old Ogden Nash:
Candy is dandy
but Old Granddad 114 proof is quicker than lightnin'.


13 posted on 08/02/2010 6:30:26 AM PDT by mc5cents
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To: SonOfDarkSkies

Early settlers in Kentucky were primarily Scotch-Irish (Scots-Irish) and English, with other ethnicities typical of the colonial Backcountry here and there (Welsh, Scot, New Amsterdam Dutch). The corn content of the mash is certainly a major determinant of the flavor of the finished product. Barley is used, but in relatively small amounts — negligible, when compared to Scotch. My personal preference is Scotch, especially “peaty”-flavored single-malts like Jura, but I do appreciate some sour mash Bourbons, like Jim Beam.


14 posted on 08/02/2010 6:33:48 AM PDT by jay1949 (Work is the curse of the blogging class)
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To: beckysueb
I wish they tried to replicate the incredible flavor of Irish whiskey!

If Kentucky distillers made a great Irish whiskey priced like Evan Williams, it would be my steady drink!

15 posted on 08/02/2010 6:34:08 AM PDT by SonOfDarkSkies (Satan's greatest trick use to be convincing men he doesn't exist! But his latest novelty is Obama!)
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To: jay1949

My all-time favorite scotch is the Dalmore (probably less popular among diehards but my tastebuds give it their vote at every tasting).


16 posted on 08/02/2010 6:39:21 AM PDT by SonOfDarkSkies (Satan's greatest trick use to be convincing men he doesn't exist! But his latest novelty is Obama!)
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To: jay1949
This is the stuff:


17 posted on 08/02/2010 6:41:40 AM PDT by Cincinatus (Omnia relinquit servare Rempublicam)
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To: AL932
If you like Woodford Reserve, try Booker's. Smooth, with a really nice warmth. Sip it, don't just slam it down...not just because you'll enjoy it more by sipping, but because it's so dang expensive!

Scouts Out! Cavalry Ho!

18 posted on 08/02/2010 6:42:01 AM PDT by wku man (Steel yourselves, patriots, and be ready. Won't be long now....)
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To: centurion316
My bourbon of choice is Woodford Reserve.

As is mine...good stuff.

19 posted on 08/02/2010 6:48:37 AM PDT by and so? (If it angers you, a sarcasm or irony tag after everything I post should be assumed)
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To: beckysueb

Most of the over mountain people, as they were then known, were Scot-Irish and Irish ancestry. Scot-Irish is still very much in evidence in many of the southern states. I am descended from Scot-Irish(most of the time pronounced Scotch-Irish)ancestors.


20 posted on 08/02/2010 6:49:35 AM PDT by calex59
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To: Mercat

Thanks for that information. I visited the Heaven Hill distillery, and nice to find out more about Craig.


21 posted on 08/02/2010 6:54:13 AM PDT by KingOfVagabonds
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To: centurion316

I have always been a Knob Creek man.


22 posted on 08/02/2010 6:56:14 AM PDT by woodbutcher1963
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To: jay1949

As one who has never even had a beer let alone a drink....( no joke, ) if I was to order Whiskey how should I order it?


23 posted on 08/02/2010 6:57:04 AM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: jay1949
My annual Christmas present to myself ...


24 posted on 08/02/2010 7:01:04 AM PDT by Malone LaVeigh
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To: Mercat
My 5th great granduncle was Elijah Craig

Some very fine whiskey produced in his name.

(I might even sip some this afternoon in his honor.)

ML/NJ

25 posted on 08/02/2010 7:05:03 AM PDT by ml/nj
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To: mc5cents
If you like high proof Bourbon, you might look for Bookers which is uncut so the proof varies. The bottle I have here says 128.

ML/NJ

26 posted on 08/02/2010 7:11:05 AM PDT by ml/nj
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To: Walkingfeather

In a glass.


27 posted on 08/02/2010 7:12:39 AM PDT by JParris
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To: AL932
Woodford Reserve is at the top of my list as well.

Concur.

28 posted on 08/02/2010 7:13:17 AM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Malone LaVeigh
>I>My annual Christmas present to myself ...

A man of fine tastes!

Pappy of any age only rarely appears on NJ shelves.

ML/NJ

29 posted on 08/02/2010 7:13:42 AM PDT by ml/nj
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To: Walkingfeather
if I was to order Whiskey how should I order it?

I like my Bourbon in a large rocks glass, 3 fingers of it over 3 good sized ice cubes. Then sip it slowly.

30 posted on 08/02/2010 7:14:44 AM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Walkingfeather

Order it on the rocks, with some water in it. It may take awhile to develop your taste for it; it took me several weeks and many different bourbons to get to the point where it tasted like anything other than rubbing alcohol...But man, is it worth it!


31 posted on 08/02/2010 7:32:03 AM PDT by LongElegantLegs ( I have nothing better to do than sit around all night watching a lunatic not turn into a werewolf.)
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To: 70times7

Shouldn’t you be here? ping!


32 posted on 08/02/2010 7:34:50 AM PDT by LongElegantLegs ( I have nothing better to do than sit around all night watching a lunatic not turn into a werewolf.)
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To: Walkingfeather
Order it 'Neat', means just whisky. Have a glass of cool, still water to dilute it about 50%. Half whisky and half water. Then sip it slowly to enjoy the flavor and aroma.
Same for Scotch whisky.
Its just not possible to taste the flavor range at full strength.
33 posted on 08/02/2010 7:38:24 AM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus)
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To: KingOfVagabonds

Elijah Craig is a favorite of mine. It has a distinctly different flavor from other fine Bourbons, almost falling toward the liqueur end, IMO. I love it...


34 posted on 08/02/2010 7:43:21 AM PDT by bcsco (First there was Slick Willie. Now there's "Oil Slick" Barry...)
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To: LongElegantLegs; All
Thanks for the ping. Hope you and yours are well.

Woodford Reserve and Knob Creek are two favorites, but lately I have been sipping and very much enjoying Makers Mark.

Why would anyone want to screw up good Whiskey by polluting it with mint leaves and powdered sugar? I suppose I can understand doing that with Jack Daniels.

For those who do not know yet - when you have your Whiskey "neat" do yourself a favor and add 2 or 3 drops of water per shot - it will open up the flavors. Don't believe me? Try this test: pour your shot and indulge in a sip or two. Then add the water and try it again. You will be surprised by how much the flavor advances.

Now all I need is a Camacho or Macanudo Maduro, or an Ashton...

35 posted on 08/02/2010 8:27:50 AM PDT by 70times7 (Serving Free Republics' warped and obscure humor needs since 1999!)
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To: jay1949

And for the 1 or 2 people who may be well versed in MST3K, sing with me: “Drivin’ down the road, lookin’ for a Whaffle House, Drinkin’ lots of Wild Turkey!” MST3K - Boggy Creek II


36 posted on 08/02/2010 8:32:12 AM PDT by 70times7 (Serving Free Republics' warped and obscure humor needs since 1999!)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks; SpinnerWebb
Bourbon makes my teeth hurt.

By the time I get done, nothing hurts .... you must not be drinking enough of it.

37 posted on 08/02/2010 8:52:05 AM PDT by tx_eggman (Liberalism is only possible in that moment when a man chooses Barabas over Christ.)
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To: 70times7

At least, they did get the correct recipe for Mint Julep. Now days they use a syrup mixture—not as good. And Maker’s Mark is our choice of Bourbon here in the bluegrass state. But spiced Woodford is my choice for egg nog.


38 posted on 08/02/2010 9:01:51 AM PDT by KYGrandma (The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home......)
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To: txhurl
If I'm sippin my bourbon I prefer Woodford Reserve. If I'm in the mood for a Manhattan/Mint Julep/Bourbon and Soda I use Maker's Mark.

Enough of either one will make you throw rocks at your own house.

39 posted on 08/02/2010 10:01:43 AM PDT by paddles ("The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates." Tacitus)
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To: 70times7
"And for the 1 or 2 people who may be well versed in MST3K, sing with me: “Drivin’ down the road, lookin’ for a Whaffle House, Drinkin’ lots of Wild Turkey!” MST3K - Boggy Creek II.

I have that one on DVD. I'm a huge MST3K fan. And to keep in the spirit of the post I am partial to Wild Turkey just not too often.

40 posted on 08/02/2010 8:47:17 PM PDT by blackbart.223 (I live in Northern Nevada. Reid doesn't represent me.)
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To: KYGrandma

Maker’s Mark is good.


41 posted on 08/02/2010 8:50:21 PM PDT by blackbart.223 (I live in Northern Nevada. Reid doesn't represent me.)
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To: woodbutcher1963
Wild Turkey 101 is my go-to Bourbon. It works for me. I reserve my Knob Creeks and Woodfords, my single malts, for special occasions.
42 posted on 08/02/2010 9:45:15 PM PDT by fhayek
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To: blackbart.223

Are you the one thay call Tim?


43 posted on 08/03/2010 4:27:04 AM PDT by 70times7 (Serving Free Republics' warped and obscure humor needs since 1999!)
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To: jay1949

For mixing nothing beats Evan Williams. For sipping — Jim Beam Black Label. And, for those special evenings — Noah’s Mill (114.3 proof).


44 posted on 08/04/2010 6:04:35 PM PDT by stump56 (Freedom isn't free.)
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