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Must I Sign Up for Medicare? (Vanity)

Posted on 08/14/2010 6:45:42 PM PDT by Thom Pain

Need help/advice. I'm about to turn 65 and am still employed in private sector full time (and hope to be for many years to come). Need to know if I have to enroll in Medicare now, or wait until I retire (someday). Can anyone steer me to good info?


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: medicare; vanity
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I'm currently stumbling thru Medicare.gov site and getting more confused by the minute. Recently spent 2 years wrestling with Gov't coordinating Medicare/Medicaid coverage for my parents. It was a TOTAL nightmare!
1 posted on 08/14/2010 6:45:44 PM PDT by Thom Pain
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To: Thom Pain

Per my husband, who is REALLY old....I have no clue.

BUT! :)

IF you’re going to, per said husband, do it prior to turning 65 if you’re going to use it. About 6 months prior to.

Free advice, worth....probably nothing. Ha!


2 posted on 08/14/2010 6:47:16 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (Here's a thought!! Donate to the website you are on RIGHT NOW!!)
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To: Thom Pain

I’m sorry not to be able to be helpful but I doubt your Senators or your congressman have a clue either. I doubt that it’s spelled out clearly in any of those 2,000+ pages of legislation.


3 posted on 08/14/2010 6:53:21 PM PDT by Mobties (I yield back the balance of my time)
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To: Thom Pain

Is your retirement age 66? if so, wait until them to collect the full amount.


4 posted on 08/14/2010 6:53:38 PM PDT by presently no screen name
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To: Thom Pain

I’ll be following this thread. I have a couple of years to go, and I don’t know what I’m supposed to do. I have private insurance now, but I don’t know if I’ll even have that as a choice when the magic 65 comes.


5 posted on 08/14/2010 6:54:38 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine
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To: Thom Pain
In the new world order of government medicine, the government will tell you, what, when ,and where you will need to know it, so take a number and wait for the over paid fat lady to call you.
6 posted on 08/14/2010 6:54:57 PM PDT by org.whodat
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To: Thom Pain

good questions. I have no idea..I thought SS automaticly signed you up????


7 posted on 08/14/2010 6:54:57 PM PDT by dalebert
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To: Thom Pain

The answer to your question is usually “yes”.

If you don’t sign up for medicare, the premiums will rise higher the longer you wait if you sign up later.

You’re not “required” to sign up, but its usually the wisest course of action.


8 posted on 08/14/2010 6:55:13 PM PDT by I_Like_Spam
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To: Thom Pain
That all depends on the individual, state of health and minimum age to get full benefits. When I retired, for example I had to wait 2 years past my minimum full-benefits age and it made a substantial difference in the starting amount, which at the time was supposed to increase as the cost of living increased (that has since been eliminated for 2009 and 2010)

As a general rule, barring health issues, it is best to begin as late as possible.

But under certain circumstances, it makes sense to start as soon as you're eligible for full benefits.

For me that was 65y2m, but I had to wait for 67y2m and got about 10% more starting benefits.

9 posted on 08/14/2010 6:55:26 PM PDT by Publius6961 ("In 1964 the War on Poverty Began --- Poverty won.")
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To: Thom Pain

Call Medicare and ask. However, I will not go on Medicare until I have no choice.


10 posted on 08/14/2010 6:56:13 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Islam is the religion of Satan and Mohammed was his minion.)
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To: org.whodat
Forgot to add make sure you get the correct number for the language you may are may not speak, in which case a signer will be available next week.
11 posted on 08/14/2010 6:56:13 PM PDT by org.whodat
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To: Thom Pain

By the tenor of your post, you act as if you DIDN’T want to be a part of the great socialist exchange that is there to BENEFIT you.


12 posted on 08/14/2010 6:56:21 PM PDT by irishtenor (Tag lines, they are not what they used to be...)
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To: Thom Pain

If you don’t do it when first offered you get penalized. You will pay more for it.


13 posted on 08/14/2010 6:58:04 PM PDT by dforest
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To: Pearls Before Swine
I’ll be following this thread. I have a couple of years to go, and I don’t know what I’m supposed to do.

If you aren't yet 65, your "magic age" will never be 65.

Looks like the first thing you need to do, from the SS site, is to determine what is your earliest retirement age for full benefits. I suspect it will be 66+, depending on your date of birth.

14 posted on 08/14/2010 6:59:48 PM PDT by Publius6961 ("In 1964 the War on Poverty Began --- Poverty won.")
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To: Thom Pain

There’s been a subtle change recently. In order to provide better benefits for government union members, retirees must sign-up immediately upon retiring and sign over all their possessions to the state, at which time the state will agree to allow them to live until such time as they need medical care.


15 posted on 08/14/2010 7:00:46 PM PDT by FourPeas (God Save America)
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To: Thom Pain
Well i was laid off for a while and signed up for Medicaid.
I paid for it my whole life so i figured i deserved it.

Anyways a year ago i got into a severe dirt bike accident and had to be airlifted in a chopper to Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. The chopper ride alone cost 6 grand.
3 days in a coma, skull fractures, broken ribs, collarbone, reconstructive surgery on my wrist, internal bleeding etc.
When all said and done 3 MRI’s and 7 days later at one our most expensive hospitals and much physical therapy later i received ZERO bills, nothing at all about it in the mail, it's like it never happened.

I guess sometimes it pays to be poor.

16 posted on 08/14/2010 7:01:01 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Thom Pain

I’m no expert but this is what I’ve been told by family members who signed up. It can benefit to sign up in case you lose your current insurance for any reason. It becomes secondary coverage even if you think you don’t need it. Also, premiums will go up if you wait, so it may be best if you sign up early and lock in lower rates. As far as I know, there is no law (now) that requires you to sign up at a specific age.


17 posted on 08/14/2010 7:01:04 PM PDT by Kirkwood (You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drunk.)
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To: Publius6961

I know SS full retirement for my age group is 66; but I thought the Medicare age was 65 regardless of which year you were born.


18 posted on 08/14/2010 7:01:31 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine
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To: mowowie

Medicare and Medicaid are totally different. Medicaid is for the indigent. Medicare is for the elderly.


19 posted on 08/14/2010 7:05:17 PM PDT by Kirkwood (You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drunk.)
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To: irishtenor
To be clear I intend to work as long as I can (I really enjoy my work & the people I work with) and I am in good health. I would like to have nothing to do with Medicare if I could, but I don't want the bastards to screw me on a technicality because I did't fill out form 67-Bx*6J, subpart 6453-Gfu7^2 exactly 23 days and 41 minutes before the first full moon after the 2nd anniversary of my second to last breakfast after the midpoint between my 64th birthday and Hannukah...

I hope to keep my company health plan, but I don't want to get snookered. I plan to defer collecting SSN until age 70. My retirement $$ are probably woefully inadequate for full retirement before age 98 (and then probably only if I promise to die by age 99)

20 posted on 08/14/2010 7:05:41 PM PDT by Thom Pain (2 + 2 = 4 : Defending the Constitution is CENTRIST; not RIGHT WING! Don't be labeled!)
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To: Pearls Before Swine

Only thing I know is that I’m on SS disability and if I stay on SS, I will be eligible next year for Medicare (2 years from date of disability as determined by SS) — even though I’ll only be 58.


21 posted on 08/14/2010 7:08:03 PM PDT by fatnotlazy
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To: Thom Pain

Oh yea i forgot.
I live in MA and under Romney care i was forced into haveing insurance or face a 2 grand fine.
Hence the Medicair.
Acually it was pretty fortunate that i signed up in retrospect, I’d be facing 10’s of thousands of dollars in bills right now.


22 posted on 08/14/2010 7:08:08 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Thom Pain
It was a TOTAL nightmare!

Isn't Obamacare gonna be so much fun. Good luck to you.

23 posted on 08/14/2010 7:08:53 PM PDT by beaversmom
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To: Thom Pain

#3 here:

http://www.medicare.gov/basics/socialsecurity.asp


24 posted on 08/14/2010 7:09:48 PM PDT by savedbygrace (Rev 22:20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord)
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To: mowowie

One doc told me if i showed up without insurance i would of walked out with a cast on my wrist instead of the titanium plate with 10 screws holding it together.


25 posted on 08/14/2010 7:10:24 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: mowowie

dude, you rock


26 posted on 08/14/2010 7:10:41 PM PDT by InvisibleChurch (Stimulus ~ Response)
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To: Thom Pain

Glad you asked. I am dealing with that, too. Husband’s insurance person said I could stay on. Doc suggested I join the local hospital’s group (similar to Kaiser), and he could still be my doc. Then that group handles the Medicare for you, I understand.

I hate Obama and I do not want to have anything to do with Medicare. Not sure what to do either; meanwhile I am stubbornly holding out and ignoring the whole thing.

Nice to have this thread posted. AND Happy Birthday.


27 posted on 08/14/2010 7:11:13 PM PDT by bboop (We don't need no stinkin' VAT)
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To: Thom Pain

When we turned 65 our private insurance was canceled and we had to go on Medicare.


28 posted on 08/14/2010 7:13:47 PM PDT by dalereed
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To: Thom Pain
1-800-772-1213. You'll be transferred to the immediate claims taking unit if you ask. Call between 7:00AM and 7:00PM. You'll get Part A for free. You don't need to take part B if you are actively employed and covered under a group health plan. You can enroll in part B at any time while employed or within 8 months of when your employment ends and you won't be penalized for late filing for part B. This is called a special enrollment period. You'll need a letter from your employer when you retire or terminate to verify that your employment has ended. After age 66 you can get full benefits whether you are working or not. You can also volunteer to not take monthly benefits and they'll adjust your benefits upward. Ask them when you call.
29 posted on 08/14/2010 7:14:35 PM PDT by Stentor
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To: Publius6961

“For me that was 65y2m, but I had to wait for 67y2m and got about 10% more starting benefits.”

That’s Social Security and hasn’t got anything to do with Medicare.


30 posted on 08/14/2010 7:16:13 PM PDT by dalereed
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To: Thom Pain

If I were you, I would check to see if your current doctors accept medicare. Many are quietly opting out now.


31 posted on 08/14/2010 7:17:58 PM PDT by Kirkwood (You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drunk.)
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To: InvisibleChurch

Yea i know.
Especially the part where i was calling Medicaid medicair.

Welfare insurance.
Too bad it didn’t come with free food stamps and section 8 housing.
Then i would really be living the dream.


32 posted on 08/14/2010 7:19:15 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Thom Pain

Went through this with my wife who went on disability before age 65. Had to take Medicare Part A (hospilitzation) but didn’t have to take Part B. (normal doctors visits and tests) However, if you didn’t take Part B, our private medical insurance would not pay for the amount that Medicare would have paid. You should check with your private insurance company before refusing, it could cost you!!!


33 posted on 08/14/2010 7:20:09 PM PDT by lunarville (Common sense ain't so common anymore...)
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To: Thom Pain

Prompted by other posters, if your GHP is terminated, you’ll need to file for part B to avoid penalty. You have to be both employed and covered to wait to file for part B.


34 posted on 08/14/2010 7:20:30 PM PDT by Stentor
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To: Thom Pain

Government what? Congrats. You are now, at best, a serf.


35 posted on 08/14/2010 7:20:41 PM PDT by petertare (--.)
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To: Thom Pain
Perusing the posts on this thread, it is evident that there is a lot of confusion on the issue.
Contrary to popular belief -which is pushed by the government - you should research the risk to benefit ratio of the earliest possible claim on SS & Medicare.
Partial or not.
If, for example, you can retire with partial benefits at 62 vs. full benefits at 65, then I would go for 62.
Unless you believe that you are going to live far past the median Life Expectancy, you accrue more during those 3 extra years than you receive in increased benefits. (usually)
Do the math & decide what seems right for you.
As far as Medicare, you need to sign up at 65 or you will have great difficulty in ever getting anything at all from the US government.
36 posted on 08/14/2010 7:21:00 PM PDT by bill1952 (Choice is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
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To: Thom Pain
This cleared it up for a friend of mine.

Medicare Penalties and Medicare Savings Programs

37 posted on 08/14/2010 7:21:17 PM PDT by Kenny
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To: mowowie
"When all said and done 3 MRI’s and 7 days later at one our most expensive hospitals and much physical therapy later i received ZERO bills, nothing at all about it in the mail, it's like it never happened."

Ha..you got lucky....somewhere there is an illegal immigrant who stole your SS number with a big bill

38 posted on 08/14/2010 7:21:18 PM PDT by spokeshave (mess + 0bama = quagmire recession)
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To: mowowie

I was referring to your accident and subsequent recovery


39 posted on 08/14/2010 7:23:24 PM PDT by InvisibleChurch (Stimulus ~ Response)
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To: Thom Pain
I would advise you to pay little attention to most of the posts here. Many seem incapable of separating SS benefits from Medicare coverage.

If the insurance you now have is employer paid, check with your employer to see if it will remain your primary insurance after 65. If you are paying for it yourself, check with the insurance company yourself.

If your present insurance will drop to that of a supplemental, absolutely sign up as soon as you get the notice.

If your insurance will remain as primary after you turn 65, you can wait to sign up for Medicare, but it will cost you a higher monthly premium for Medicare once you do sign up.

I have employer paid insurance, it is part of my retirement package. But once I turned 65 earlier this year, it dropped to a Medicare supplemental policy. I signed up for Medicare as my primary three months before I turned 65. My monthly Medicare premium is $110.

40 posted on 08/14/2010 7:24:42 PM PDT by Roccus (......and then there were none.)
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To: I_Like_Spam

Last I read, it costs you 7% for every year over 65 if you later decide to sign up.
My husband is 10 yrs. older and so we had to carry ins. for me for 10 yrs and he didn’t sign up and now it would cost him 70% more per month and is out of the question for us.


41 posted on 08/14/2010 7:25:23 PM PDT by IceAge
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To: Kirkwood
Yea i figured that out after i posted. :)

Seems the people on welfare have it better off than the people who worked their whole life for insurance.

PS.
I an not a welfare guy, i got laid off and my COBRA screwed me.
Mitt Romney demanded i have coverage so hence the Medicaid.
It was only temporary but convenient considering....

42 posted on 08/14/2010 7:27:45 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Roccus; Thom Pain

I should have mentioned that I was referring to Medicare part B


43 posted on 08/14/2010 7:27:45 PM PDT by Roccus (......and then there were none.)
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To: Thom Pain

I signed up for SS when I turned 62, several years ago. Began drawing benefits even though I am self-employed and work full-time. I just pay a little more tax every year but that’s okay for now. Reduction was not that great and I had been paying in for 46 years! Have private insurance but also signed up for Medicare. As long as someone who covers you is employed (spouse or yourself), their insurance will be primary and Medicare secondary. Have had great insurance for 15 years-big deductible but inexpensive. Advised last week that my premium will increase from $250/month to $870/month because they have to add in maternity, HIV/AIDS, mental health, unlimited chemo, etc. to comply with new mandated coverage which I chose not to have before. Can’t afford that so will be forced to have only Medicare. I signed up for Medicare when eligible because penalty was going to be too great if I postponed. Once you sign up you will get a huge book that doesn’t have answers either. Thank God I don’t take meds. Trying to figure out those options is an almost impossible task.


44 posted on 08/14/2010 7:29:12 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: Thom Pain

Find Medicare on the internet. It is simply Medicare.gov. It is fairly easy to sign up. You cannot at the moment choose a different plan other than Medicare Parts A & B. In the last part of the year, you can choose other options with other providers. THAT is where the challenge comes in. You can have insurance companies that provide other Medicare plans come talk to you, just as you are buying other insurance.

I signed up for Medicare when I turned 65. They began to take it out of my Social Security funds.

Get ready to starve to death.


45 posted on 08/14/2010 7:29:40 PM PDT by righttackle44 (I may not be much, but I raised a United States Marine.)
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To: Thom Pain
I just went through the paperwork. Medicare Part A is free. I just filled in the paper saying I didn't want any extra parts, any upgrades or the pharmaceutical program. That means I pay nothing for Medicare. I have insurance from my previous employer, so for me no more coverage is necessary. What Medicare Part A covers is hospital and expenses with a few other things. For your at-work insurance, it means that's an expense they don't have to pay.

The feds send you a card after you respond to which coverage you want which you present along with your regular insurance card.

Warning....you will be hounded to tears by insurance companies selling "gap" insurance and other types of coverage. I've found some of the reps are pretty rude and talk down to me like I'm old and senile or whatever.

46 posted on 08/14/2010 7:32:48 PM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: Kenny

Ping for later to read when I want to get to sleep and have insomnia...ha.


47 posted on 08/14/2010 7:33:30 PM PDT by Recovering Ex-hippie (Ok, joke's over....Bring back Bush !)
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To: InvisibleChurch
Yea man it was crazy.
the docs were telling my mom i may be paralyzed.
She was freaking out.
It really sucked.
I also broke my jaw and had my mouth wired shut for 2 months drinking energy drinks thru a straw.
Last summer sucked!

Thank god for Romneycare and the taxpayers!!! i woulda just blown off the insurance until my next job.

Wait, what am i saying? lol

48 posted on 08/14/2010 7:36:40 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Pearls Before Swine
I know SS full retirement for my age group is 66; but I thought the Medicare age was 65 regardless of which year you were born.

You're correct. People are confusing Social Security, which increases if you wait until after age 62 with Medicare, which is age 65 for everyone. Part A is free; I think the other parts might go up in cost if you wait.

49 posted on 08/14/2010 7:39:15 PM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: presently no screen name; Thom Pain
Is your retirement age 66? if so, wait until them to collect the full amount.

You're talking Social Security not Medicare, you can start SS at age 62 with reduced payments all the way out to age 70 with bonus payments added to your base rate. Medicare starts at age 65 period.

My advice, check with your employer's insurance carrier, they may automatically drop you when you turn 65 leaving you w/o health insurance coverage of any kind. Previous post suggested starting six months early, I don't think there is much you can do until you are down to about 90 days.

I retired early and my wife carried the insurance. When she retired they dropped her back from a family plan to single coverage and I paid a grand a month to bring it back up to a family plan. When I turned 65, they dropped me completely and I transitioned to Medicare w/ a supplemental policy to caulk the leaks. They would not carry me past 65. My wife is 63 and still covered by her former employer's health plan as part of her retirement benefits which will end at age 65. Hope this helps clarify things for you.

Regards,
GtG

PS Maybe if you are a member of the UAW/CIO you might get lifetime coverage in you retirement package (or a congress critter, GS-15, or such like), but us peons get the one size fits all coverage. Even retired military get "Tri Care for Life" which is a slightly beefed up medicare.

50 posted on 08/14/2010 7:42:49 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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