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To: scrabblehack

If you want to do “Enterprise Zones” then you need to do it like they do in Asia, specifically China. Set up a 200 square mile “Enterprise Zone” and go for it.

Something like Shanghai, or the Guangzhou and Fujian Provinces. THAT works, because it’s big enough that thousands of businesses of all size can set up, and have plenty of room to grow, and you can build infrastructure for it.

A square mile here, or square mile there simply isn’t enough area to build a growing, thriving area.


4 posted on 08/23/2010 6:14:47 PM PDT by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the Sting of Truth is the defense of the indefensible)
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To: PugetSoundSoldier

I have to agree with you there. I spent some time in China in a EZ, the EZ was huge 120+ sq km, and employed about a half million people.

THe closest I’ve seen in the USA is in NJ, .. taking a blurb from the NJ Urban EZ website:

Administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, the UEZ Program supports nearly 150,000 full-time jobs and has attracted more than $24 billion in private investment.
There are almost 7,000 businesses of all sizes and types participating and benefiting from the advantages of the UEZ Program. These include a number of tax and other financial incentives. Since the program’s inception, over 26,000 businesses have enjoyed UEZ Program benefits.


NJ has 37 municipalities with UEZs, the one closest to me is quite successful, with a good mix of big box and main st retail, manufacturers, and professional offices.

The downside to the targeted “urban” EZ in NJ is the customer base arbitrage steals sales from corporations outside the UEZs.


6 posted on 08/23/2010 10:41:59 PM PDT by JerseyHighlander
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