Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Did University of California Berkeley have to cut student sports? NO!
Bayareanewsgroup | Oct 9 2010 | Milan Moravec

Posted on 10/24/2010 1:58:52 PM PDT by Moravecglobal

UC Berkeley’s recent elimination of popular sports programs highlighted endemic problems in the university’s management. Chancellor Robert Birgeneau’s eight-year fiscal track record is dismal indeed. He would like to blame the politicians in Sacramento, since they stopped giving him every dollar he has asked for, and the state legislators do share some responsibility for the financial crisis. But not in the sense he means.

A competent chancellor would have been on top of identifying inefficiencies in the system and then crafting a plan to fix them. Compentent oversight by the Board of Regents and the legislature would have required him to provide data on problems and on what steps he was taking to solve them. Instead, every year Birgeneau would request a budget increase, the regents would agree to it, and the legislature would provide. The hard questions were avoided by all concerned, and the problems just piled up to $150 million….until there was no money left.

It’s not that Birgeneau was unaware that there were, in fact, waste and inefficiencies in the system. Faculty and staff have raised issues with senior management, but when they failed to see relevant action taken, they stopped. Finally, Birgeneau engaged some expensive ($3 million) consultants, Bain & Company, to tell him what he should have been able to find out from the bright, engaged people in his own organization.

From time to time, a whistleblower would bring some glaring problem to light, but the chancellor’s response was to dig in and defend rather than listen and act. Since UC has been exempted from most whistleblower lawsuits, there are ultimately no negative consequences for maintaining inefficiencies.

In short, there is plenty of blame to go around. But you never want a serious crisis to go to waste. An opportunity now exists for the UC president, Board of Regents, and California legislators to jolt UC Berkeley back to life, applying some simple check-and-balance management principles. Increasing the budget is not enough; transforming senior management is necessary. The faculty, students, staff, academic senate, Cal. alumni, and taxpayers await the transformation.


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: athletics; california; educationfunding; highereducation; provostbreslauer; uc; ucberkeleyoe; ucmarkyudof; ucregents
UC Berkeley’s recent elimination of popular sports programs highlighted endemic problems in the university’s management. Chancellor Robert Birgeneau’s eight-year fiscal track record is dismal indeed. He would like to blame the politicians in Sacramento, since they stopped giving him every dollar he has asked for, and the state legislators do share some responsibility for the financial crisis. But not in the sense he means.

A competent chancellor would have been on top of identifying inefficiencies in the system and then crafting a plan to fix them. Compentent oversight by the Board of Regents and the legislature would have required him to provide data on problems and on what steps he was taking to solve them. Instead, every year Birgeneau would request a budget increase, the regents would agree to it, and the legislature would provide. The hard questions were avoided by all concerned, and the problems just piled up to $150 million….until there was no money left.

It’s not that Birgeneau was unaware that there were, in fact, waste and inefficiencies in the system. Faculty and staff have raised issues with senior management, but when they failed to see relevant action taken, they stopped. Finally, Birgeneau engaged some expensive ($3 million) consultants, Bain & Company, to tell him what he should have been able to find out from the bright, engaged people in his own organization.

From time to time, a whistleblower would bring some glaring problem to light, but the chancellor’s response was to dig in and defend rather than listen and act. Since UC has been exempted from most whistleblower lawsuits, there are ultimately no negative consequences for maintaining inefficiencies.

In short, there is plenty of blame to go around. But you never want a serious crisis to go to waste. An opportunity now exists for the UC president, Board of Regents, and California legislators to jolt UC Berkeley back to life, applying some simple check-and-balance management principles. Increasing the budget is not enough; transforming senior management is necessary. The faculty, students, staff, academic senate, Cal. alumni, and taxpayers await the transformation.

1 posted on 10/24/2010 1:58:56 PM PDT by Moravecglobal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

Did they cut Tree Sitting 101?


2 posted on 10/24/2010 2:01:02 PM PDT by screaminsunshine (the way to win this game is not to play)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

Well, you won’t get any sympathy from me for cutting sports. I think ALL sports should be cut out of ALL schools. Sports is utterly useless and teaches nothing. It is a giant waste of money and time in education. There is nothing wrong with sports outside of school but in school it should be eliminated. Want to play sports? Fine. Do it on your own time. Stop wasting education money on sports.


3 posted on 10/24/2010 2:03:02 PM PDT by Mobile Vulgus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

I have a young friend who is an absolute star on the Berkeley Women’s gymnastic team, which recently has been cut. She is Olympic quality talent and I think it is a crying shame that Berkeley has abandoned her sport.


4 posted on 10/24/2010 2:08:50 PM PDT by EggsAckley ( There's an Ethiopian in the fuel supply!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EggsAckley
what do they pay their endeared very important tenured profs...way over what they are worth...just like 99% of the other universities throughout the usa
5 posted on 10/24/2010 2:12:56 PM PDT by ldish (Looking forward to Independence Day)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

Well, you won’t get any sympathy from me for cutting sports. I think ALL sports should be cut out of ALL schools. Sports is utterly useless and teaches nothing. It is a giant waste of money and time in education. There is nothing wrong with sports outside of school but in school it should be eliminated. Want to play sports? Fine. Do it on your own time. Stop wasting education money on sports.


Tax dollars are not used for sports programs at state universities. It is all private money...boosters, ticket sales, logo merchandise, TV money.

A school like Cal does not take tax dollars to run the sports programs.

Sports programs are the only entity that brings in revenue to a college. Most of the booster of an athletic program are also the biggest donors to academic programs.

Sports are also the best PR a school can have. Most people could care less about an award-winning horticulturalist who created gay venus fly-traps.....a successful athletic program brings in the attention and the money.

If the colleges did not have sports...most of your colleges would disappear. Even Hillsdale College....pushed by so many radio talkers...has a successful Division II football program


6 posted on 10/24/2010 2:14:03 PM PDT by UCFRoadWarrior (They don't let you build churches in Mecca)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

Really?

I have seen some really silly and even stupid posts on here but yours really stands out

I suppose education in Art & Music is wasteful as well and has no place in mental or physical development.

So, bright boy, what would YOUR school teach?

Enlighten us all please


7 posted on 10/24/2010 2:16:36 PM PDT by 100American
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

In the future, please post your blog material in our bloggers forum.

Thanks,


8 posted on 10/24/2010 2:22:46 PM PDT by Admin Moderator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

I think sports teach a lot. Leadership skills, competitiveness (which to a point is very good), dedication (hey I had to watch a soccer game in 38 degree weather with a steady wind last week and I wasn’t even a player) and other life skills. Also, when the body is in shape the mind works better as well. I am willing to pay extra out of my pocket for my kids school sports, but really don’t think I should have to. The money is already there if used wisely. There is band, drama, chess club, and lots of other activities for kids not into sports, and many like my kids enjoy many activities. And really, there is nothing like representing your school and home town on the field/ court. Life long memories. I love that my two girls want to play sports.

Now the way some schools choose teams or run their programs— completely different story but I don’t think the remedy is to get rid of sports at school. As to Cal - Berkley, probably just wanted to get rid of
anything “competitive”, after all we are all equal in a socialist utopia, don’t ya know.


9 posted on 10/24/2010 2:25:09 PM PDT by MacMattico
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

While there are some sports of value, this is a value of recreation, not competition. As such, there is little academic value, but a means for students to relax between times.

Yet this points to an even greater problem, of States subsidizing worthless and useless college degrees, with no appreciable career possibilities for such graduates. Since such degrees are frivolous, they should be eliminated from any subsidized education and be for purposes of vanity only, fully paid for by the student or their parents.

It would be simplicity itself to determine which degrees should no longer be subsidized. Simply compare the number of subsidized graduates with a particular degree, to the number who have had successful placement in a degree oriented job within six months after graduation.

If a degree program does not educate for job placement, it should not be subsidized by the taxpayer. The public can no longer afford vanity degrees for the unemployable. Those degrees are superfluous.


10 posted on 10/24/2010 2:31:17 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

As an aside, Bain and co. .. Wasn’t that Romney’s company?


11 posted on 10/24/2010 2:31:40 PM PDT by MacMattico
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

UC Berkeley’s recent elimination of popular sports programs, such as, Contact Hula-hoop combat fighting and Beer Pong using Tippy Cups. Is gerbil racing also out?

How very sad. Will this mean there will no longer be government funding for their annual Rubber Chicken award?


12 posted on 10/24/2010 2:31:49 PM PDT by Gator113 (Beauty will devour the Beast in 2012. Kill "Obamamosque"@ Ground Zero)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EggsAckley

“I think it is a crying shame that Berkeley has abandoned her sport.”

So do I, especially since that’s the ONLY university which she can attend...geeeze...why not go to the university to LEARN something?


13 posted on 10/24/2010 2:41:15 PM PDT by choctaw man (Good ole Andrew Jackson, or You're the Reason God Made Oklahoma...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

“The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing-fields of Eton”.

The Duke of Wellington is often quoted as saying that “The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing-fields of Eton”. Wellington was at Eton from 1781 to 1784 and was to send his sons there. According to Nevill (citing the historian Sir Edward Creasy), what Wellington said, while passing an Eton cricket match many decades later, was, “There grows the stuff that won Waterloo”, a remark Nevill construes as a reference to “the manly character induced by games and sport” amongst English youth generally, not a comment about Eton specifically.


14 posted on 10/24/2010 2:44:16 PM PDT by lack-of-trust
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moravecglobal

How Berkeley can you be? (Warning - Disgusting display of liberals parading in the buff)

http://zombietime.com/how_berkeley_can_you_be/


15 posted on 10/24/2010 2:46:38 PM PDT by MarineBrat (Better dead than red!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

At a lot of larger schools, the sports program brings in hundreds of millions of dollars a year to the college. This, in turn reduces tuition and the impact on taxpayers for maintaining the campus, research, and classes there.


16 posted on 10/24/2010 2:50:19 PM PDT by Thunder90 (Fighting for truth and the American way... http://citizensfortruthandtheamericanway.blogspot.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: MacMattico

For roughly 120 years...American leadership didn’t have any connection to sports. For another 40 years after that, it had almost no contribution to our leadership in the country. I’m not exactly sure if this is a good argument or not. Plus I gaze over to sports in Europe...which exists but not within schools...and everyone is happy over the relationship of local towns and villages, without school involvement, to major-league sports.


17 posted on 10/24/2010 2:53:47 PM PDT by pepsionice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: pepsionice

I agree, taxpayer money needs to be specifically authorized by voters, or none should go to schools for sports after building of facilities. There can be private clubs that can be organized at school, but there are more important things than paying for coaches, equipment and insurance.


18 posted on 10/24/2010 3:11:49 PM PDT by runninglips (Don't support the Republican party, work to "fundamentally change" it...conservative would be nice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: pepsionice

Sport has long been part of schools and colleges in England—and considered integral to the formation of leaders. The modern Division I version over here is a completely different beast, however.


19 posted on 10/24/2010 3:17:40 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: 9YearLurker

When John Wooden won his first NCAA basketball title I believe he had but four scholarship players on the team, and all of them graduated. Compare that with today when there are four or five scholarships given a year, with most failing to graduate.


20 posted on 10/24/2010 3:26:33 PM PDT by Melchior
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Melchior

But look at the average professional salary of those scholarship basketball dropouts!


21 posted on 10/24/2010 3:31:26 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: pepsionice
How do you know sports have had no relationship to leadership? Sports have been played for thousands of years, certain skills, including leadership are learned —I sight myself as an example. Now, if you mean school sports have had no connection to leadership I don't believe that either. School sports have allowed children that can't afford to play privately excel with a given sports talent, this in turn has boosted their self confidence and given them the ability to be a leader on the field as well as to come out of their shell in the community, academically (you have to keep your grades up to play) etc. I've seen this in many children. We talk about childhood obesity and then want to cut sports. Huh? I myself came from a large family and played sports in the neighborhood, nothing organized, couldn't afford it. My father talked me into trying out for basketball, telling me what a great experience he had in HS. I was to shy, questioned my ability, and didn't want to be embarrassed. But I tried out— and didn't make the team! But the I got serious, took my basketball and walked to the park everyday and shot hoops and learned defense with my dad at my side. Following year I made the team, became a captain by varsity, my grades improved because I was busy and had to manage my time, had to stay in shape, no drugs or alcohol, confidence soared, ended up 8 th in my graduating class, with an academic not sports scholarship. There are just so many intangibles you learn from sports! I also played soccer and softball, so I kept busy, also in band. Got up at 6:00 got home from school at 5:30, even later on game day. Some of the best experiences of my life! I am a female and have girls that play sports. We all grew up strong because of sports! And as to comparing us to Europe, other then Soccer I'll bet on the USA in any other sport vs any European country in the Olympics!
22 posted on 10/24/2010 4:06:56 PM PDT by MacMattico
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

I agree completely, FRiend. It is way past time to eliminate the jockstrap mentality from our publicly-funded schools.


23 posted on 10/24/2010 4:09:53 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: choctaw man
Contrary to your extremely negative and uninformed opinion,
she IS learning......learning a lot. She has a 4.5 average, and lots of promise in several different fields. And this is a young woman who financially couldn't attend college without some kind of scholarship to help.

Gee, I went to college, graduate school in fact. I'm finding it difficult to understand why so many “freepers” are negative about college, unless of course, they didn't bother to pursue the experience.

24 posted on 10/24/2010 4:31:15 PM PDT by EggsAckley ( There's an Ethiopian in the fuel supply!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus
I think ALL sports should be cut out of ALL schools.
Sports is utterly useless and teaches nothing.

What if blogpimping were a sport? How about if there were blogpimping scholarships?

Maybe students should just sit on their fat asses and pimp
lame blogs instead of playing sports. How cool would that be?

25 posted on 10/24/2010 4:44:00 PM PDT by humblegunner (Pablo is very wily)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: clee1

Good on ya for not bowing to the sports mafia!!


26 posted on 10/24/2010 6:17:38 PM PDT by Mobile Vulgus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Mobile Vulgus

No problem, FRiend. I have nothing against sports. I like many sports and you’ll need a company of the 82nd Airborne to pry me away from a Braves game.

BUT... I cringe at the thought of the $$$$ we waste on school sports at all levels. I cringe at the numbers of ignorant jockstraps we produce all in the name of a “game”. While participating in sports CAN have lasting beneficial effects on children, far too often the hyper-competitive “win at all costs” mentality and the sense of entitlement they engender amongst the “stars” outweighs those benefits.

You want to participate in sports, or you want your kids to... fine; YOU pay for it. I want my money to go to the education of my kids - and sports plays a very small part in that education.


27 posted on 10/24/2010 6:34:57 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: clee1

My position precisely. Sports are fine. Just not in school and not with my tax $$.


28 posted on 10/24/2010 9:03:22 PM PDT by Mobile Vulgus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: EggsAckley

“Contrary to your extremely negative and uninformed opinion,
she IS learning......learning a lot. She has a 4.5 average, and lots of promise in several different fields. And this is a young woman who financially couldn’t attend college without some kind of scholarship to help.
Gee, I went to college, graduate school in fact. I’m finding it difficult to understand why so many “freepers” are negative about college, unless of course, they didn’t bother to pursue the experience.”

Like Juan Williams, I’m expressing my opinion which is not uninformed, is that everyone, including this young lady, has a choice...in this case to go to Berkeley or not.

I have four earned college degrees, thanks.


29 posted on 10/25/2010 6:25:47 AM PDT by choctaw man (Good ole Andrew Jackson, or You're the Reason God Made Oklahoma...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: EggsAckley

I have a young friend who is an absolute star on the Berkeley Women’s gymnastic team, which recently has been cut. She is Olympic quality talent and I think it is a crying shame that Berkeley has abandoned her sport.
____________________________________________________

I really feel bad for that lady...I have seen the Cal women’s gymnastics team competing against UCLA at Pauley Pavilion...

I am really disappointed that Cal cut baseball also...Cal is the biggest school in the UC system...But, it will not have a baseball team after this school year...A long time ago, Cal team played Yale in the College World Series...George Bush the elder was on the Yale team...


30 posted on 10/26/2010 11:32:24 PM PDT by L.A.Justice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson