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The Buck 110 Knife Set the Standard

Posted on 12/12/2010 2:46:39 PM PST by JoeProBono

Why is the Buck 110 knife one of the most sought after knives? The first word that ran through my mind when I opened the blade of this Buck knife and heard the lock click, was "Solid". That was back in 1980

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The Buck 110 knife is made with brass bolsters and liners.

Buck describes the handle material as "natural woodgrain" which I think is the trade name for a certain color of high quality wood laminate.

The handle scales are attractive and tough, and they're pinned to the handles.

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The 3 3/4" clip point blade of this Buck folding hunter is made of Buck's 420 HC stainless, and it's shaving sharp right out of the package.

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This Buck 110 folding hunter knife came with a nylon sheath with a snap on the flap, not velcro.

I prefer a snap.

When I get a knife sheath that has velcro, I remove the velcro and install a snap.

A snap can be opened and closed quietly, but velcro always make that ripping noise.

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The Buck 110 knife would be perfectly at home on any construction or industrial job site.

Use it to open boxes; cut sheets of canvas, rubber, paper or plastic; cut notches in drywall or wood trim, cut or slice wire and cable insulation, scrape gaskets, sharpen pencils, remove or install pipe insulation, you name it.

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On hunting or fishing trips, the Buck 110 knife can be used to clean fish or game, prepare meals, whittle tent stakes, trim brush and branches for lean-to's, cut rope and twine, and for a dozen other chores.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: banglist; buck; knife
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1 posted on 12/12/2010 2:46:46 PM PST by JoeProBono
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To: JoeProBono

The folding hunter, a 70’s icon right along with Lynyrd Skynrd and mullets. Solid and dependable, but impossible to sharpen.


2 posted on 12/12/2010 2:49:10 PM PST by Tijeras_Slim (Pablo lives jubtabulously!)
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To: JoeProBono

Got one. Bought it in the mid 70’s.

But somehow, somewhere over the years, (teenage son, I think), about 1/2 inch of the tip of the blade got broken off.


3 posted on 12/12/2010 2:54:26 PM PST by digger48
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To: JoeProBono
I prefer my Kershaw Skyline...lighter, OK for the pocket and easier to open and get a solid grip on it. That said, my first real knife (unless you count a series of Boy Scout knives) was a Buck folding hunter my Dad gave to me. And there is something to be said for that, too...

Skyline:


4 posted on 12/12/2010 2:55:12 PM PST by Mr Rogers (Poor history is better than good fiction, and anything with lots of horses is better still)
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To: Tijeras_Slim

got one.. keep it by my bed..


5 posted on 12/12/2010 3:00:12 PM PST by Chuzzlewit
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To: JoeProBono

I believe Buck still makes their knives in the USA.


6 posted on 12/12/2010 3:04:34 PM PST by Last Dakotan (Hunting - the ultimate in organic grocery shopping.)
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To: Mr Rogers
That was then and this is now:


7 posted on 12/12/2010 3:07:40 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: JoeProBono
I have the rip-off "Uncle Henry" by Shrade.

Love it.

8 posted on 12/12/2010 3:17:27 PM PST by InternetTuffGuy
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To: JoeProBono

I have a couple of them around somewhere. The 110 started something as I have a couple of Shcrades which appear identical.

I actually like the Schrade models a little better. The Buck steel is just plain hard to sharpen. It can be brittle too. I had a friend break the blade on his while chopping ice.

Is Schrade still in business? Seems like I read a while back that they went under. If so I hate to see it.


9 posted on 12/12/2010 3:18:06 PM PST by yarddog
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To: Tijeras_Slim

Try one of these:

http://spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=77

Gets my 110’s poppin hairs in nothing flat.


10 posted on 12/12/2010 3:19:08 PM PST by mainevet (Get an M1911 or two or three or four)
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To: yarddog

11 posted on 12/12/2010 3:21:50 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: Last Dakotan; JoeProBono

I believe that’s correct. From Wiki:

“In 2005 the company relocated to Post Falls, Idaho. Leaders of the San Diego business community considered this move a blow to San Diego County’s economic landscape and a symbol of the state of California’s problems in attracting and keeping businesses.” (LOL, California wins again!)

That said, I’d consider 420 about the lowest grade of steel to make a good blade these days. (Cheap, though.) Most have moved on to at least ATS-34.

Had a Buck folder as a kid in the ‘70s. Loved it, lost it... These days my constant companion is a Chris Reeve large Sebenza. Best. Folder. Ever.


12 posted on 12/12/2010 3:22:29 PM PST by Moltke ('Tis very strange. - Hamlet)
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To: Moltke

13 posted on 12/12/2010 3:25:33 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: JoeProBono

My problem with Buck knives over the decades has been the variation in the quality of the blade metal. Some bucks were very difficult to sharpen or keep sharp. There was a time, though, when they were an essential part of a country boy’s hunting attire....


14 posted on 12/12/2010 3:25:39 PM PST by ArtDodger (Reread Animal Farm (with your kids))
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To: JoeProBono

I think I have that one too but my Schrade models look just like the Buck 110.

If I put them side by side I might see a difference but I don’t think there is any.


15 posted on 12/12/2010 3:26:04 PM PST by yarddog
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To: JoeProBono
They were like Mag lite flashlights used to be, the standard, back in the day.

I like my Benchmade Rukas 610.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

16 posted on 12/12/2010 3:26:05 PM PST by ansel12 (Lonnie, little by little the look of the country changes, because of the men we admire.)
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To: ArtDodger

The first Buck knife was made in 1902 by Hoyt Buck a blacksmith apprentice. The first knives he made were hand crafted using worn-out file blades as raw material.


17 posted on 12/12/2010 3:29:15 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: JoeProBono
The 110 is a nice knife but for some reason I always ended up with Schrade LB7s. Similar design but I liked the steel better on the Schrade. They're both some work to sharpen if you let them get to dull but they hold their edges well.

I worked over an old 110 for a friend last year. I tightened up the bolsters, worked out some rough spots on the brass and polished her up so she looked like new. It's an old school lockback but still a gem.

If you practice a bit you can open them one-handed with a satisfying “snick” almost as fast as a switchblade.

18 posted on 12/12/2010 3:31:03 PM PST by 5by5
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To: JoeProBono

Yuck. I think they were designed by a mixed gender artist to win a design contest. They are ugly, awkward, and uncomfortable.


19 posted on 12/12/2010 3:31:48 PM PST by Born to Conserve
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To: ansel12

20 posted on 12/12/2010 3:33:54 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: Chuzzlewit
I got one too. Keep it in a drawer. Keep the 9mm and the 12 ga. by the bed. Anyone breaks into my house is not going to get close enough to where a knife will help me.
21 posted on 12/12/2010 3:35:58 PM PST by fish hawk
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To: 5by5

22 posted on 12/12/2010 3:36:54 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: JoeProBono

It is a lot of knife.

Blade Length: 4.25”

Blade Thickness: 0.150”

Blade Material: S30V Stainless Steel

Blade Hardness: 58-60HRC

Blade Style: Utility Drop-Point; Ambidextrous Dual Thumb-Studs

Weight: 7.70oz.
Clip: Black, Reversible, Tip-Up

Lock Mechanism: AXIS

Overall Length: 10.12”

Closed Length: 5.95”

Sheath Material: No Sheath


23 posted on 12/12/2010 3:40:46 PM PST by ansel12 (Lonnie, little by little the look of the country changes, because of the men we admire.)
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To: JoeProBono

I bought one at Viet Nam PX in 1969. Think I paid 12 bucks for it. Carried it through two Viet Nam tours, then as a belt knife until about 1985. Put it in a drawer until today, pulled it out and knife opened easily, quite a bit of wear on the blade but still impressive. BTW in 69 the 110’s came with a leather sheath.


24 posted on 12/12/2010 3:44:40 PM PST by chittlin (chittlin)
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To: ansel12
My other Buck


25 posted on 12/12/2010 3:46:00 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: JoeProBono

My slicer and dicer - -

http://www.benchmade.com/images/pr/pdf/TacticalRespose_580-585-_Nov-Dec_2009.pdf


26 posted on 12/12/2010 3:50:59 PM PST by iontheball
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To: JoeProBono

Yes, that one pictured in post 22 is what my Schrades look like. Pretty much a twin of the Buck, at least in appearance.


27 posted on 12/12/2010 3:51:54 PM PST by yarddog
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To: Tijeras_Slim

Had one since they first came out in the ‘70’s.....and have no problem keeping it razor-sharp with my 3-stone/multi-angle sharpening kit from Lansky....my fav knife for sure. Many copy it, but they just aren’t the same.

Main problem I have is green copper oxide growing on the brass ends when I don’t use it much.....


28 posted on 12/12/2010 4:01:28 PM PST by Arlis (- Virginia loghome/woods-dweller/Jesus lovin'/Bible-totin'/"gun-clinger")
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To: Moltke

Chuck Buck went to my high school along with most of his family and a lot of his workers. It was a very hard decision for him to move from El Cajon, California but the city, county and state bureaucrats were crawling though his business and it was simpler to leave California. I also left California and my kids are about to leave also. Soon all that will be left are ‘undocumented’ workers and liberals.


29 posted on 12/12/2010 4:29:23 PM PST by pikachu (After Monday and Tuesday, even the calender goes W T F !)
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To: JoeProBono
Pretty close, mine are (I have two - one made to order that just sits in a drawer) the pre-2001 'classic' versions with the BG-42 steel blades. Looks exactly like this S30V version:

The bead-blasted handle finish looks a bit utilitarian and shows scratches easily, so I gave the carry-knife a nice satin finish with this (no tool box should be without one):

The polishing block follows the contours and gives the edges a slightly polished quality. Looks very classy now. The full hollow grind on the nicely wide blade makes for great cutting. Often whip it out when some restaurant offers me one of those serrated "steak knives" that just tear the meat and let the juice run out. The Sebenza slices like a scalpel.

30 posted on 12/12/2010 4:33:32 PM PST by Moltke ('Tis very strange. - Hamlet)
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To: JoeProBono
Who didn't have a Buck folder growing up back in the day? I think mine broke, but I probably abused it.

I still have an old Case work knife from the 70's in good shape.

The classic Case canoe knife is also a good one.

These days, my favorite is my Gerber.

31 posted on 12/12/2010 4:34:55 PM PST by smokingfrog ( ><{{{{{(0>)
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To: pikachu

What a shame, isn’t it? California offers so much natural beauty that I’d really love to live there just for that reason. (I’d settle for a log house in Yosemity, thank you very much.) But reality bites...


32 posted on 12/12/2010 4:42:18 PM PST by Moltke ('Tis very strange. - Hamlet)
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To: Tijeras_Slim
Solid and dependable, but impossible to sharpen.

Really? Huh. My dad sharpens my Buck knife and it is sharp enough to shave with. It stays sharp for a long time too.

Maybe I should ask him what he is doing.

33 posted on 12/12/2010 4:42:39 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (When all you have is bolt cutters & vodka everything looks like the lock on Wolf Blitzer's boathouse)
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To: digger48

Did you know that all Buck knives are guaranteed for life? You can send it back and get it re-tipped or, if that’s not feasible, get a new one.

THE BUCK FOREVER WARRANTY

The Buck Knives Forever Warranty is pretty much what it says. A Buck Knife is built to last. But if for some reason, your Buck is defective due to materials or workmanship, you can return it to us for repair. No matter where you bought it.

We will repair your knife, including parts, labor and or replacement with a new knife at our discretion. Keep in mind, repair is not always possible or practical. We will replace your knife with the same or one that is comparable if your knife is no longer available. Please note if your knife has sentimental value when you send the knife to us.
REPAIRS NOT COVERED UNDER WARRANTY

If your knife needs to be repaired, please send it to us for evaluation. Don’t try to repair it yourself. Self–repair will void your warranty, not to mention that it could cause self–injury.
Reasons why we may charge you a small fee for a repair:

* Damage caused by misuse or abuse.
* Failure to care, clean and maintain your knife.
* Damage due to self–repair.
* Knife loss due to shipping to and from the Buck Knives factory
* Damage due to dismantling or tampering with your Buck knife
* Sharpening your Buck knife on a grinder.

HOW TO SEND YOUR KNIFE IN FOR REPAIR:

*
Tell us who you are and what is wrong with your knife.
Let us know what you think is wrong with your knife. Include your name, address, phone number and email address.
*
Wrap your knife securely.
Before you ship your knife, please make sure you have cleaned it thoroughly, removing all traces of game remnance. Please put each cleaned knife in a sheath or wrap in cardboard to protect it during shipping. Pack it so the point will not cut through the packaging. You will get your sheath or cardboard back upon return.
*
Packing up your knife.
We prefer that you pack your knife in a box. A padded envelope may also work if the knife isn’t too heavy or bulky. Be sure to put packing around the knife so it sits securely in the package.
*
Shipping methods.
We recommend that you insure your package and send it by a certified receipt that can be tracked if necessary. This will help protect you against possibility of loss or damage to your knife. Note that knife loss, including shipping to and from the Buck factory, is not covered under warranty.

Send your packaged knife to:

Buck Knives
Attn: Warranty Dept.
660 S. Lochsa St.
Post Falls, ID 83854
800 326-2825 x184


34 posted on 12/12/2010 4:51:27 PM PST by oneolcop (Lead, Follow or Get the Hell Out of the Way!)
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To: JoeProBono; Alamo-Girl; Amityschild; AngieGal; AnimalLover; Ann de IL; aposiopetic; aragorn; ...

If Buck says it’s wood, you can be sure it’s wood.

They are a solid family of genuine Christians.

Roland Buck pastored First Assembly of God in Boise, ID

His brother, First Assembly of God in Spokane, WA. I knew the latter.

I once heard Roland Buck speak of his impressive angelic visitations. His brother’s personality was typical Assembly of God.

Roland’s was kind of like Walter Cronkite—very unflappable. No nonsense—not at all the sort to engage in funny business nor to suffer fools gladly.

His

ANGELS ON ASSIGNMENT is available to read free online here:

http://www.angelsonassignment.org/

It is full of encouragement and demonstrations of God’s majesty and power in our era.


35 posted on 12/12/2010 5:03:28 PM PST by Quix (Times are a changin' INSURE you have believed in your heart & confessed Jesus as Lord Come NtheFlesh)
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To: yarddog

I got the Schrade X-Timer folder for me and my son. 3” blade that holds a razor edge, skeleton aluminum handle, weighs next to nothing. Rides comfortably in my back pocket.


36 posted on 12/12/2010 5:04:02 PM PST by GunsAndBibles
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To: ansel12

They do not make the RUKUS any more do they???


37 posted on 12/12/2010 5:05:54 PM PST by ColdSteelTalon (Light is fading to shadow, and casting its shroud over all we have known...)
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To: Quix

My friend who broke the blade on his Buck sent it back and they repaired it.

I remember back around 1951 my Brother broke the blade on his knife, (I can’t recall the brand, it may have been a Queen), and they repaired it for free.

I once lost an Uncle Henry and took advantage of their free replacement. I had to get a form notarized but they did replace it.


38 posted on 12/12/2010 5:08:52 PM PST by yarddog
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To: yarddog

Excellent.

Not surprised.

Thx.


39 posted on 12/12/2010 5:12:51 PM PST by Quix (Times are a changin' INSURE you have believed in your heart & confessed Jesus as Lord Come NtheFlesh)
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To: JoeProBono; kanawa
If that is Model 119 then it is the official, freerepublic bear hunting knife.

Man (Freeper kanawa) stabs bear to death

40 posted on 12/12/2010 5:16:53 PM PST by ansel12 (Lonnie, little by little the look of the country changes, because of the men we admire.)
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To: smokingfrog

“These days, my favorite is my Gerber.”

My Gerber Mark I is over thirty years old.

Always liked Puma, too.


41 posted on 12/12/2010 5:16:57 PM PST by Daniel II (Really??????)
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To: JoeProBono

I prefer the Schrade, although the Buck and Puma also make good knives. Puma was easier to sharpen, while the Buck kept the edge longer.


42 posted on 12/12/2010 5:18:15 PM PST by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Cvengr

Put a dab of Militec-1 on your blade and it will stay sharp twice as long as normal.


43 posted on 12/12/2010 5:28:42 PM PST by B4Ranch (Do NOT remain seated until this ride comes to a full and complete stop! We're going the wrong way!)
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To: Daniel II

Puma just may be the best mass produced knives in the world. My Father brought one home from WWII. Daddy gave it to my Uncle who was a butcher. He told me it was the best knife he ever had.


44 posted on 12/12/2010 5:43:32 PM PST by yarddog
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To: JoeProBono
I have several of these Buck 110’s. I also have KBar and Case knockoffs. I went to a gun show a year ago and bought a half dozen of Pakistani knockoffs for $4 each. I have lately been purchasing hand made knives from Butch Hanby, Julia Martin, Sunrise Knives, and others. I got a Randall fighting knife, a Murphy fighting knife, and a few Gerbers along the way. I carry a Kershaw quick release in my pocket.
45 posted on 12/12/2010 5:56:52 PM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: Tijeras_Slim
The folding hunter, a 70’s icon right along with Lynyrd Skynrd and mullets. Solid and dependable, but impossible to sharpen.

Funny you should say that. I got one of these Puma Sergeant knives during the same era, and also could never sharpen the thing worth a damn.

Were the 70's actually strange enough to overharden steel? Did it have something to do with those shag rugs and avacado colored appliances?


46 posted on 12/12/2010 6:06:13 PM PST by Talisker (When you find a turtle on top of a fence post, you can be damn sure it didn't get there on its own.)
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To: yarddog
Puma just may be the best mass produced knives in the world. My Father brought one home from WWII. Daddy gave it to my Uncle who was a butcher. He told me it was the best knife he ever had.

Perhaps in the past. When the good knives came from Solingen and Sheffield. These days, almost all (Böker/Solingen still makes some good ones) of the high quality folding/fixed blade utility/"tactical" knives are made in the US. (I have some old Puma folders, and they don't measure up anymore.) It's a long list. Solingen still produces excellent kitchen cutlery, though (Henckels/Zwilling, Wüsthof). Something the US manufacturers haven't focused on yet.

47 posted on 12/12/2010 6:13:30 PM PST by Moltke ('Tis very strange. - Hamlet)
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To: Moltke; Daniel II

Oh, Puma is still very popular with the hunters. Stag handles and all that, in a traditional sense. And blade shapes specifically adapted to hunting requirements.


48 posted on 12/12/2010 6:19:55 PM PST by Moltke ('Tis very strange. - Hamlet)
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To: vetvetdoug
I once had a Gerber Lightweight folder and didn't bother replace it.
Was running trotlines and had it out & ready on the deck of the boat...the wind picked it up and threw it over the rail.
49 posted on 12/12/2010 6:21:45 PM PST by Deaf Smith (When a Texan takes his chances, chances will be taken that's for sure.)
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To: JoeProBono

Got the 110 and the fixed blade in the pic. Have a sailing Buck w/ a fid.
Of late I’ve switched to Kershaws.


50 posted on 12/12/2010 6:26:44 PM PST by Vinnie
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