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Large Cities and the Elimination of the Middle Class
Metropolis ^ | February 14, 2011 | Joel Kotkin

Posted on 02/14/2011 4:27:31 PM PST by Tom Rounder

America’s largest cities are increasingly divided into three classes: the affluent, the poor, and the nomadic class of young people who generally come to the city for a relatively brief period and then leave. New York, the aspirational city of my grandparents, now has the smallest share of middle-income families in the nation, according to a recent Brookings Institution study, with Los Angeles and San Francisco not far behind. In 1980 Manhattan, New York’s wealthiest borough, ranked 17th among U.S. counties for social inequality; by 2007 Bloomberg’s “luxury city” was first, with the top fifth earning 52 times the income of the lowest fifth, a disparity roughly comparable to that of Namibia.

(Excerpt) Read more at metropolismag.com ...


TOPICS: Politics
KEYWORDS: blueamerica; bluezones; elitists; poverty; urban
Great moments in Blue America.
1 posted on 02/14/2011 4:27:33 PM PST by Tom Rounder
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To: Tom Rounder

Large urban cities are blighted sewers and getting worse every day.


2 posted on 02/14/2011 4:34:35 PM PST by Ev Reeman
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To: Tom Rounder

I’m not a big city fan, but this trend can’t be good for America.

This crushing debt is killing the standard of living for the middle class - who’s taxes are funding the welfare class.


3 posted on 02/14/2011 4:39:47 PM PST by nascarnation
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To: Ev Reeman
Large urban cities are blighted sewers and getting worse every day.

Actually both Chicago and New York are way better than they were 15 years ago and far better than they were in the 1970s.
4 posted on 02/14/2011 4:41:44 PM PST by aruanan
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To: nascarnation
who’s taxes are funding the welfare class.

Good question, the bigger worry is what's gonna happen the markets ask that same question...

5 posted on 02/14/2011 4:43:45 PM PST by The Magical Mischief Tour (With The Resistance...)
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To: Tom Rounder

This is the portal from which our Community-Organizer-in-Chief assesses his political landscape.

Be afraid.


6 posted on 02/14/2011 4:44:00 PM PST by Cletus.D.Yokel (Islam is a violent and tyrannical political ideology and has nothing to do with "religion".)
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To: aruanan

I could possibly see a case for NYC because of America’s mayor but not what Bloomberg has done.

I cannot see at all what you are talking about about Chicago. Crime and corruption are home to Chicago.


7 posted on 02/14/2011 4:45:40 PM PST by Ev Reeman
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To: Ev Reeman
Large urban cities are blighted sewers and getting worse every day.

Buck Owens: I Wouldn't Live In New York City.

8 posted on 02/14/2011 4:46:04 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: Tom Rounder

Give me a Shack in the woods with a nice fireplace, A beautiful woman(who has no problem with the shack), Food, A LARGE supply of Bourbon and high speed internet and i will be happy for the rest of my life.


9 posted on 02/14/2011 4:59:28 PM PST by mowowie
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To: Tom Rounder

What I have seen in various cities where I live, work or visit is that the inner cities have gentrified, pushing the underclass out to the suburbs. With that trend crime and poverty has moved from the cities to suburbs.


10 posted on 02/14/2011 5:02:53 PM PST by trumandogz
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To: Tom Rounder
One reason for this movement has been the shift of jobs away from the coasts to lower-cost, less dense cities. The fastest growth in middle-income jobs has been concentrated in many of the places listed above: Houston, Dallas, Austin, Raleigh-Durham, and Salt Lake City. This pattern also includes high-tech, science-oriented employment. In contrast, those jobs have been stagnant or shrinking in such cities as New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Chicago.

These cities become centers of consumption, rather than production. I guess it's a spiral: the more rich people you have, the more expensive things are and the harder it is for ordinary people to live there. Of course high taxes play a big role in stifling business too. Once upon a time a company headquartered in Manhattan might produce goods in Brooklyn, and ship them around the country or the world. Nowadays the factory is probably in China or Central America.

11 posted on 02/14/2011 5:02:59 PM PST by x
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To: Ev Reeman

Actually, NYC has a very low crime rate.

I feel safer walking around NYC at night than I do in smaller ciities or most suburban areas.


12 posted on 02/14/2011 5:06:59 PM PST by trumandogz
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To: nascarnation

“This crushing debt is killing the standard of living for the middle class - who’s taxes are funding the welfare class.”

All part of the plan... (for the destruction of the United States of America)


13 posted on 02/14/2011 5:07:55 PM PST by griswold3 (We defend conservatism by our very way of life.)
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To: Tom Rounder
I saw this same phenomenon about 20 years ago in Hilton Head, SC. There are the workers and the “owners”. I noted then that it was a stratified place. I don't know if that is still true, but I would bet that most upper class resorts are like that. You have the poor people who bus in to work in different capacities, and you have the wealthy owners and well to do vacationers short term.

Strange, but I never saw the correlation to large urban cities before, thinking it was more a “island mentality” occurrence...

14 posted on 02/14/2011 5:07:55 PM PST by bareford101 (. All Muslims lie to infidels to confuse them)
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To: Tom Rounder
Cities are easier to "corral"; you can control people better when they are bunched together.

It's those who are scattered in the suburbs and in flyover country that worries the ones would would like to "take over".

Why else would they want us in cars that only go 50 miles? Or tax airfare too high to afford it?

High speed trains, no stops?

the boxcars are next...
15 posted on 02/14/2011 5:16:43 PM PST by FrankR (The Evil Are Powerless If The Good Are Unafraid! - R. Reagan)
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To: FrankR

“Cities are easier to “corral”; you can control people better when they are bunched together.”

“It’s those who are scattered in the suburbs and in flyover country that worries the ones would would like to “take over”.”

My guess is that a Mr. Mubarak would disagree with you.

His nation has 25% of the people,100% of the political power and 90 of the economic power all in one city and his dictatorship collapsed after just 18 days of protest.

Such a scenero could not happen here as the people and power are dispersed.


16 posted on 02/14/2011 5:27:18 PM PST by trumandogz
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To: aruanan
New York are way better than they were 15 years ago and far better than they were in the 1970s.

Absolutely agree with you about the '70s and '80s. Giuliani was the game changer; by 1997, things were on the way up. By 2001, it was at its apex. IMHO, Bloomberg's reign (I mean that literally) has been letting things slowly slip since 2002. But, I still feel safer in midtown Manhattan at night than I do in downtown Columbus.

Disclaimer: I am an east coast native now living in Ohio for the past 19 years who travels to NYC a minimum of four times a year on business.

17 posted on 02/14/2011 7:16:20 PM PST by buccaneer81 (ECOMCON)
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To: aruanan
New York are way better than they were 15 years ago and far better than they were in the 1970s.

Absolutely agree with you about the '70s and '80s. Giuliani was the game changer; by 1997, things were on the way up. By 2001, it was at its apex. IMHO, Bloomberg's reign (I mean that literally) has been letting things slowly slip since 2002. But, I still feel safer in midtown Manhattan at night than I do in downtown Columbus.

Disclaimer: I am an east coast native now living in Ohio for the past 19 years who travels to NYC a minimum of four times a year on business.

18 posted on 02/14/2011 8:01:11 PM PST by buccaneer81 (ECOMCON)
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To: Ev Reeman

I dont see that it is that much different in the smaller cities.


19 posted on 02/14/2011 8:15:33 PM PST by Chickensoup (“If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stomping on a human face — forever.” Orwell)
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To: trumandogz

One of the few times you and I agree.


20 posted on 02/14/2011 8:28:32 PM PST by buccaneer81 (ECOMCON)
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To: Tom Rounder

The decline of cities began with the introduction of government schools and compulsory attendance. Rather than have their children be forced to attend poorly performing and dangerous schools, the middle class left the cities. The poor could not escape, and the rich send their children to private schools.

One will always find government at the root of almost any problem.


21 posted on 02/14/2011 10:48:38 PM PST by Pining_4_TX
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To: Ev Reeman
I cannot see at all what you are talking about about Chicago. Crime and corruption are home to Chicago.

Nevertheless, Chicago is far better now than it was at any time during the last 40 years. It's FAR better than it was just 16 years ago. You're forgetting what the original comment was that I was responding to.
22 posted on 02/15/2011 5:00:21 AM PST by aruanan
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To: Tom Rounder

Marx came up with a system to get rid of the middle class.

Cities have implemented more Marxism than other places. The proof is in the pudding.


23 posted on 02/15/2011 9:15:02 AM PST by Tzimisce (Never forget that the American Revolution began when the British tried to disarm the colonists.)
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