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10 Common Prepping Mistakes
Urban Survival Site ^ | 4/9/11 | Urban Alan

Posted on 04/06/2011 5:26:51 AM PDT by Kartographer

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To: Kartographer

Thanks for telling me this, I did not know.


101 posted on 04/06/2011 1:38:00 PM PDT by texgal (end no-fault divorce laws return DUE PROCESS & EQUAL PROTECTION to ALL citizens))
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To: Red in Blue PA

6 mos. to a year is what I’ve read.


102 posted on 04/06/2011 1:48:52 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: bgill

I read an article several years ago about a fellow who was building a homestead, and installed a 20,000 gallon fiberglass watertank underground near the house and diverted 100% of the water caught by the roof into the tank. It took him 8 months to fill it, but he was able to install a sump through the manhole on top, and had himself one beautiful cistern full of free water.

He emphasized in the article that it was no simple matter to do...he had a significant excavation and several feet of packed gravel underneath the tank to support the weight.

Obviously that won’t work for everyone, but it’s a neat concept that is open to adaptation...


103 posted on 04/06/2011 1:52:43 PM PDT by Bean Counter (Stout Hearts!!)
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To: Bean Counter

Interesting idea. Though my septic is right there so can’t dig. Can’t even put a cement porch there (which I’d like) and slope the water away. Can’t re-grade the yard because of the new septic. But hey, all’s good when it doesn’t rain, right? Can’t even remember what rain looks like and it’s already in the 90s so a long hot summer is just starting.


104 posted on 04/06/2011 2:09:23 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: Bean Counter

That's I wonder if some of these earthbag/cisterns tied together wouldn't work.

http://earthbagplans.wordpress.com/2009/06/24/earthbag-cistern/
105 posted on 04/06/2011 2:09:59 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: RC one; Kartographer; All

My thoughts on being ‘Prepped” is leaning to, not being stationary.
Laying in big supplies may be the first option but I’m planning on being as mobil,as necessary. Have a plan as were to meet, family and those few, you trust.
The Katadyn products fit these plans. The acquisition for replacement filters is essential! Education of living off the land and away from”NonPrepped” is my choice. H2O is worth more than GOLD at times like those.


106 posted on 04/06/2011 2:23:21 PM PDT by GOYAKLA (Flush Congress in 2010 & 2012)
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To: MrB

Oh ok, sorry I misunderstood!


107 posted on 04/06/2011 2:29:58 PM PDT by BenKenobi (Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong. - Silent Cal)
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To: GOYAKLA
"H2O is worth more than GOLD at times like those."


See numbers 2 and 3.
From a Sarajevo War Survivor: Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war - death of parents and friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper attacks.
1. Stockpiling helps. but you never no how long trouble will last, so locate near renewable food sources.
2. Living near a well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.
3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in war quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold's.
4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity - it's the easiest to do without (unless you're in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy - it makes a lot of the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only needs enough heat to "warm", not to cook. It's cheap too, especially if you buy it in bulk.
6. Bring some books - escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more valuable as the war continues. Sure, it's great to have a lot of survival guides, but you'll figure most of that out on your own anyway - trust me, you'll have a lot of time on your hands.
7. The feeling that you're human can fade pretty fast. I can't tell you how many people I knew who would have traded a much needed meal for just a little bit of toothpaste, rouge, soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have to lose your humanity. These things are morale- builders like nothing else.
8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches

108 posted on 04/06/2011 2:33:17 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Great concept, but if I were going to do that much digging I’d want a lot more than just 2000 gallons. From the description that looks like the biggest size you could build from earthbags....


109 posted on 04/06/2011 2:55:48 PM PDT by Bean Counter (Stout Hearts!!)
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To: Bean Counter

Dig two and join them 4000 gallons then.


110 posted on 04/06/2011 3:08:08 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: B4Ranch

I read about it in 198? in a magazine called american survival guide. Think about the physics of it. You are distilling water out of a liquid with a higher boiling point (ethylene glycol). ethylene glycol boils at ~197 degrees celcius. Waters boils at ~100 degrees celcius. The water will evaporate while the ethylene glycol would remain behind nowhere near its boiling point. The only way I would do such a thing is if my life depended on it of course. It’s strictly a stranded in the desert with no alternative thing.


111 posted on 04/06/2011 3:46:25 PM PDT by RC one ("merchants have no country")
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To: Kartographer

placemarker


112 posted on 04/06/2011 3:54:57 PM PDT by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: Kartographer

I’ll have to look around and find the site about well digging....

This fellow worked out a fairly simple system for use in Africa to dig shallow wells safely. He used a pair of steel rings that were about 5’ in diameter, that supported long planks that were wedged against the earth all the way around the excavation. It looked big enough for 2 guys max, but it was a very effective technique.

You dig out about 6” under a plank, slip the wedge and drop the plank to the bottom, then go to the next one. You need a hand winch of some sort above to lift out the buckets of dirt, but you keep on going, lowering the planks, rings and wedges until you’re below the water table, then you set a perforated plastic riser, backfill the hole with gravel and then sand, withdrawing the planks and rings as you go. You can cap the top any way you want and the riser is good for a hand pump or several kinds of water pumps.

It was fascinating reading and struck me as an outstanding thing to know how to do...

If I find the link, I’ll start a thread and ping you....


113 posted on 04/06/2011 4:37:54 PM PDT by Bean Counter (Stout Hearts!!)
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To: GlockThe Vote

I have one of those Eton radios. It has a hand crank and can run for a few minutes if you’re willing to crank it.
It also has a solar charger on it!
Plus, it takes regular batteries.

The only problem I found is that it seems I can’t turn it all the way to “off”. If I turn it to the “off” position, there is still some kind of residual drain on the main batteries.
So I put them in and stuck a small piece of plastic over the contact, which is easily removable.

AM/FM/SW, but the SW reception is sporadic. I suppose I could open it up and hang a forty foot piece of wire on to it an do much better!


114 posted on 04/06/2011 4:54:27 PM PDT by djf (Dems and liberals: Let's redefine "marriage". We already redefined "natural born citizen".)
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To: RC one

Thanks for the explanation.


115 posted on 04/06/2011 6:54:44 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Allowing Islam into America is akin to injecting yourself with AIDS to prove how tolerant you are .)
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To: TexasRepublic

Yeah, it says three years but I just used one that was a little over 4 years old and who knows how long it sat on the stock shelf before they mailed it to me.

It’s a ceramic filter, like Berkey, and it should sit on the shelf indefinitely. They also say if you use it at least once and then store it the shelf life is then 5 years.

I don’t get it but....

So I like the Berkey for home or stationary sites.

But the Lifesaver fits the bill for portability and that’s why I like it.

We have two Lifesaver 6000’s and two replacement filters.

On the Berkey we have one at each of our homes and one at the office.

I’m going to make a Berkey per Kartographer’s instructions. for only $120!


116 posted on 04/06/2011 7:14:51 PM PDT by Vendome ("Don't take life so seriously... You'll never live through it anyway")
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To: RC one
yeah, I was worried about that. Thanks for putting my mind at ease. LOL

Kartographer is correct on this one. We have a 120 gallon holding tank with a chemical feeder (using bleach - blue label only). Our well water, though safe suffers from the "rotten egg" (sulfate-reducing bacteria) smell.

The bleach is really only effective for one year and it is not possible to store for long periods. I purchase from Sam's and found about a year is effective however some say nine months. Chlorine Bleach Shelf Life

I finally purchased a case of 68% Calcium Hypochlorite pool shock. This was both a prepper and economic decision. Mixing my own bleach will save me hundreds of dollars over the next decade. I will be keeping some of the bleach bottles for the mix. This will allow many of the other materials in pool shock to settle out before filling the chemical feeder.

Kartographer is also correct when he cautions about storing the pool shock. In the past I had pool chemicals stored on metal shelving with paint cans. Everything corroded around the plastic containers. For the pool shock I use mason jars, rubber gasket, and plastic lid. This seems to be sufficient to slow down the corrosion problem.

Hope this helps.
117 posted on 04/06/2011 8:14:48 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: TexasRepublic

Thanks for the post. I purchased the British Berkefeld over 12 years ago and was wondering what the difference was.


118 posted on 04/06/2011 8:23:39 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: PA Engineer

I truly don’t care.


119 posted on 04/06/2011 8:30:18 PM PDT by RC one ("merchants have no country")
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To: RC one
I truly don’t care.

Then why are you posting here?
120 posted on 04/06/2011 8:32:26 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: PA Engineer

You get some odd ones now and then. There was a FReeper on a post I made last week about Earth/Sand Bag shelters. Who more or less said we were all crazy and that prepping wouldn’t do us any good and that the military.government would just come and get all our stuff and then I guess shoot us as be un-uniformed combatants. He was very angry and want to know why I would hide out in a cave and how he was going back into uniform and he had seen war and I was naive to prep because it was going to do any good.

Takes all kinds.


121 posted on 04/06/2011 9:09:03 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer; Eaker

Thank you for writing that manual an Eaker for hosting it for you to share .......


122 posted on 04/06/2011 10:00:32 PM PDT by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
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To: Kartographer
Takes all kinds.

Thanks. Yeah that was a strange one. All the "preparation and survival" images and did not know about bleach. Oh well.

I'm working on a current project. Burn barrels are useful, but unsightly and they fall apart after a couple of years. My hardware store carried an interesting product by the name of LinkLog. These are like the old lincoln logs from childhood, except they are made of reinforced concrete.

I bought the large barbecue a few years back and carried something like 56+ pieces around the back of my house and assembled it in one afternoon. The barbecue is now eight years old and shows no sign of wear.

They make another interesting product that is an incinerator. This would be very useful for long term refuse and yard waste disposal, while blending into the landscape. Just click on the picture for the link. You may have to google a bit for a local dealer. I really wish I had invented these.


123 posted on 04/06/2011 10:59:38 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: Squantos; Kartographer
first aid kids,

Mine grew up, but one gave me a grandson so I guess he can substitute!

124 posted on 04/07/2011 6:06:05 AM PDT by Eaker (The problem with the internet, you're never sure of the accuracy of the quotes. Abraham Lincoln '65)
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