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Why Atlas Shrugged Changes Lives
Pajamas Media ^ | April 16, 2011 | Debi Ghate

Posted on 04/16/2011 5:33:32 AM PDT by Kaslin

Whatever your response to the movie, know that there is no substitute for reading the Ayn Rand novel. (Also see: "Mr. Galt Goes to Washington.")

Hearing about the new Atlas Shrugged movie, I thought back to my first encounter with Ayn Rand’s epic novel. When I read Atlas Shrugged, I was captivated. There were complicated romantic relationships, alliances and treachery, heroes who overcame obstacles, villains who tried to stop them, and an intriguing question that seemed to be behind it all: “Who is John Galt?” And yet, it was unlike anything I had ever read before. My response was far from unique. From CEOs to college students to celebrities, people declare that reading Ayn Rand’s novel has a life-changing effect. Why?

Through her story and characters, Rand turns conventional thinking on its head. Which businessman would you expect to be a hero: the publicly spirited CEO, James Taggart, who calls for corporations to give back to the community and fights for business to be regulated in the name of the public good — or the wealthy entrepreneur, Hank Rearden, who proudly seeks to generate as much profit as possible, the public interest be damned? James Taggart, right? Not in Ayn Rand’s world.

By introducing to us a new kind of hero, Rand challenges our own thinking. Maybe, just maybe, we’ve been pursuing the wrong ideals in life. Should I pursue a career in business to make money, or so that I have something to give away? Should I be a doctor because I have an obligation to help the needy, or because I love the subject and have exceptional skills and training to trade with patients willing to pay me? Should I be proud of what I’ve earned, or should I feel guilty because others have less? Am I required to accept moral ideals on faith, as religions teach, or are there rational standards by which I can determine right from wrong? For Rand’s characters, the answers to these questions are vital to their happiness, and it is a betrayal of self not to ask them.

Among the novel’s heroes are ambitious capitalists unapologetically pursuing money, values, and success. There is Hank Rearden, the industrialist who creates Rearden Metal, a new alloy that is stronger, safer, and cheaper than anything else on the market. There is Dagny Taggart, the executive who risks everything on her own judgment in order to build a great railroad. Both want to make as much profit as possible by perfecting their products. In today’s world, as in Atlas, such people are criticized as “selfish” and “greedy.” In today’s world, as in Atlas, antitrust lawsuits and controls to rein in their greed are brought against such people. But in Rand’s world, when the capitalists are faced with these attacks, we see these people as persecuted victims, not wrongdoers.

More widely, when the novel’s heroes learn that they should not feel guilt in the face of irrational demands — even if the demands come from your mother who is nagging you to give your shiftless brother a job he does not deserve — we learn it too. When they learn to stand up for the right to their own lives and happiness — even if this means you will be denounced by your family, colleagues, and the public for refusing to sacrifice yourself — we learn it too. When the novel’s heroes refuse to be sacrificial lambs, we come to agree with their reasons.

And so as readers, sometimes against our previous beliefs, we side with her heroes and want to see them overcome their opponents. After Hank Rearden invests millions and his very soul into creating Rearden Metal, the response is a concerted effort to keep the metal off the market; worse, when its value is grudgingly recognized, people demand subsidized access to it in the name of the public good. How completely unjust! — we think in outrage. We rally behind the proud, value-creating man. We become invested in his success. What our priests and teachers taught us was immoral, Rand boldly presents as heroic — and we wish we could meet her heroes in real life.

How did Ayn Rand reach us with such impact? Her challenge to conventional thinking is presented in the form of a riveting story. We can be inspired by her new ideas, see their concrete meaning, and apply them to our own lives. This is the reason her book has had a lasting impact on so many people since it was published in 1957.

So whatever your response to the movie, know that there is no substitute for reading Atlas Shrugged – or rereading it and reconnecting with why it changed your life.

(Also see: “Mr. Galt Goes to Washington.”)


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: atlasshrugged; aynrand; bookreview; hollywood

1 posted on 04/16/2011 5:33:34 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

Any FReeper movie reviews yet? My 18 year old son saw it yesterday and said it was awesome. Reviews have said that it stinks. Rotten Tomatoes gives it a 5 out of 100 on the Tomatometer.


2 posted on 04/16/2011 5:39:57 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Yo-Yo
My 18 year old son saw it yesterday and said it was awesome. Reviews have said that it stinks.

Nothing ever changes in the marxist media.

3 posted on 04/16/2011 5:40:44 AM PDT by paulycy (Islamo-Marxism is Evil.)
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To: Yo-Yo

FReeper reviews of Atlas Shrugged here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2705471/posts


4 posted on 04/16/2011 5:47:53 AM PDT by kevao (I)
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To: paulycy

I reas Atlas Shrugged at precisely the right time: just after college and as I was starting my first business.

The book was just perfect for me at that age: slightly repetitive, engrossing, dramatic, and filled with new ideas I had never considered about Man and government.

New ideas beget new ideas. I became more open minded about what freedom really means, and little by little, I became a sane American citizen.

Ayn Rand was no “conservative,” but her legacy is a not-so secret weapon in the war against communism and fascism.

Buy the book for ANY 18-25 year old in your periphery.


5 posted on 04/16/2011 5:56:41 AM PDT by golux
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To: Kaslin
I first read Ayn years back when people on the DECNET were calling me John Gault.

I wondered who he was. That was about 1980.

Re red everything but “Anthem” a dozen times. “Atlas Shrugged” is such a fine book that for some reason I continue to reread. I have a copy in my car, a copy at work, and a copy on top of my Bible and dictionary, right here.

Given dozens of copies of Atlas and Fountain head out over the years.

I await the new movie. Prepare to see the previous one on TCM.

6 posted on 04/16/2011 5:57:08 AM PDT by mmercier (Who is John Gault...?)
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To: Yo-Yo

Maybe it’s time to Freep the Tomatometer... No doubt that’s what is going on over at DU.


7 posted on 04/16/2011 5:58:53 AM PDT by golux
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To: Kaslin

I have never understood the fascination with Rand. She was a pompous atheist, nothing more than a early 20th century Eastern european intellectual which today we would call a secular humanist. Is it because she was pro capitalist that many people here read her works with enthusiasm?


8 posted on 04/16/2011 6:00:17 AM PDT by sueuprising (The best of it is, God is with us-John Wesley)
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To: golux
Buy the book for ANY 18-25 year old in your periphery.

I raised three sons and I saw to it that they each had their own copy. I know that each of them at least read most of it, if not all of it. That was good enough for me. And they all have good common sense and value personal freedom so I am happy.

9 posted on 04/16/2011 6:00:42 AM PDT by paulycy (Islamo-Marxism is Evil.)
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To: Kaslin

Sounds like the reviews are positive.....Good sign that a lot of people hate the film.....I’d be worried if the Lady GaGa crowd liked it. (Which is most of the population today.)


10 posted on 04/16/2011 6:02:26 AM PDT by There You Go Again
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To: Yo-Yo

“Any FReeper movie reviews yet?”

I can’t remember the last movie I saw in a theater. I saw it yesterday. It was excellent. The action was fast-paced. The evil people were right off TV and from the Democratic party. They used all the current buzzwords; fairness, helping others, etc. The movie didn’t even exaggerate anything, it was a straight line from where we are to where we’re going to be if we don’t get off the train. The hero and heroine are powerful (unrealistically young and good looking) millionaires out to do their job. The bad guys could be straight from Obama’s White House. (Van Jones, anybody?)


11 posted on 04/16/2011 6:03:21 AM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: mmercier

I believe I screwed up. The old movie was the Fountainhead... I think... Therefore I am... I think...

B&W has a way of slipping away. Like much else lately.


12 posted on 04/16/2011 6:09:36 AM PDT by mmercier
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To: Gen.Blather
The last movie I saw in theater was “Ghost”.

Stopped going because of distaste regarding the feeding of parasites.

13 posted on 04/16/2011 6:13:54 AM PDT by mmercier
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To: kevao; Gen.Blather

Thanks very much!


14 posted on 04/16/2011 6:18:07 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: golux

“Maybe it’s time to Freep the Tomatometer”

The 5% rating is coming from reviewers. The audience rating is 86%, which is actually pretty good (Source Code is rated 90% by reviewers and 87% by the audience, etc.). So unless Freepers are movie reviewers, “Freeping” isn’t going to influence the 5% score.


15 posted on 04/16/2011 6:18:33 AM PDT by DrC
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To: Kaslin

Atlas Shrugged was recommended to me by a wonderful friend, years ago. I was apolitical at the time and the book certainly changed my life. I began to pay attention to politicians and whether or not they love big government enough to rob us of our self-reliance and our freedom. I hope everyone will see the movie..I certainly will.


16 posted on 04/16/2011 6:19:37 AM PDT by jazzlite (esat)
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To: Yo-Yo

Yeah the “experts” are panning it while, from what I gather thus far, audiences are liking it.


17 posted on 04/16/2011 6:21:35 AM PDT by Nickname
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To: mmercier
I first read Ayn years back when people on the DECNET were calling me John Gault.

Who is John Gault? Ayn Rand's character is named John Galt.
18 posted on 04/16/2011 6:33:03 AM PDT by Tzfat
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To: ADemocratNoMore; Aggie Mama; alarm rider; alexander_busek; AlligatorEyes; AmericanGirlRising; ...

Why reading the book is as important as seeing the movie.


19 posted on 04/16/2011 6:51:12 AM PDT by Publius
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To: Gen.Blather
“Any FReeper movie reviews yet?”

It's an american capitalist interpretation of Jane Austen!

20 posted on 04/16/2011 6:55:49 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: Yo-Yo

I saw it last night and enjoyed it. I don’t think it could have been done any better. The actress who played Dagny was absolutely perfect in every way.

That said, I really don’t think the book works too well as a movie. Rand’s dialogue reads better than it sounds when spoken, and I think they had to leave out so much that somehow the scope of the story seems kind of diminished.

I think people who loved the book will really like the movie. But for someone who has never read it, I can’t imagine this movie will really be a moving experience.


21 posted on 04/16/2011 7:05:53 AM PDT by Maceman (Obama -- he's as American as nasi goreng)
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To: Publius

IMHO, the book is always better than the movie - can’t think of a single exception.


22 posted on 04/16/2011 7:16:23 AM PDT by austingirl
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To: sueuprising
I have never understood the fascination with Rand. She was a pompous atheist

We are fascinated by her ideas. That she didn't always live up to them only shows she was human. Your attitude reminds me of liberals who dismiss the Constitution because some of the signers kept slaves.

23 posted on 04/16/2011 7:42:26 AM PDT by BfloGuy
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To: Kaslin
I first read "Atlas Shrugged" when I was about 17. I had been raised in a thoroughly-Republican family where self-reliance was the primary virtue. The book reinforced what I had considered, up till then, to be little but parental blathering.

I wish people would read more of Rand's non-fiction and her incredible epistemology. Most stop at the virtue of selfishness and think that's all she had to say.

24 posted on 04/16/2011 7:46:29 AM PDT by BfloGuy
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To: Kaslin
I read the book about two years ago and it's AMAZING how her dialog fits modern Obama liberals.
25 posted on 04/16/2011 7:59:02 AM PDT by libertylover (The problem with Obama is not that his skin is too black, it's that his ideas are too RED.)
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To: austingirl

I can think of two, and only two, movies that were better than the books: “A Clockwork Orange” and “Contact.”

Cheers,
Jim


26 posted on 04/16/2011 8:01:26 AM PDT by gymbeau (Free Tibet! (Limit two per customer))
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To: sueuprising
Your ad-hominem attack on Rand is illustrative of the fact that you clearly don't know what you're talking about. It also means that that you've already lost both the argument and your credibility.

People read Atlas Shrugged for its ideas, ideas which have proven to be one the cornerstones of human freedom. Read the book, then get back to us.

27 posted on 04/16/2011 8:05:48 AM PDT by Noumenon ("How do we know when the Government is like that guy with the van and the handcuffs?" --Henry Bowman)
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To: Kaslin

If, only, the “Road to Serfdom” could be made into a movie.


28 posted on 04/16/2011 8:34:08 AM PDT by depressed in 06 (Hope and change is share the poverty.)
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To: Kaslin

I watched the original version on TNT a while back. It was the most boring movie I’ve ever watched. The acting was pathetic, and the dialog was phony.

I assume this version can’t be any worse.

Has anyone seen the original version and actually enjoyed it?


29 posted on 04/16/2011 8:43:39 AM PDT by Theo (May Rome decrease and Christ increase.)
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To: sueuprising

In answer to your last question...YES.


30 posted on 04/16/2011 8:51:38 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: austingirl

“The Natural” by Bernard Malamud....The book was awful...the movie was great.


31 posted on 04/16/2011 9:25:05 AM PDT by the lastbestlady (I now believe that we have two lives; the life we learn with and the life we live with after that.)
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To: Yo-Yo

An 18-year old son who recongizes the value of the movie’s message is awesome!


32 posted on 04/16/2011 9:32:13 AM PDT by balls (0 lies like a Muslim (Google "taqiyya"))
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To: gymbeau

I stand corrected ;)


33 posted on 04/16/2011 10:21:35 AM PDT by austingirl
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To: the lastbestlady

Didn’t read that one!


34 posted on 04/16/2011 10:22:26 AM PDT by austingirl
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To: austingirl

DON’T!! The movie is great...the novel is depressing.


35 posted on 04/16/2011 10:32:11 AM PDT by the lastbestlady (I now believe that we have two lives; the life we learn with and the life we live with after that.)
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To: austingirl

DON’T!! The movie is great...the novel is depressing.


36 posted on 04/16/2011 10:32:18 AM PDT by the lastbestlady (I now believe that we have two lives; the life we learn with and the life we live with after that.)
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To: austingirl
IMHO, the book is always better than the movie - can’t think of a single exception.

See Mosquito Coast for the exception that tests[1] the rule.


[1] "To prove" meant "to test" when that proverb was coined!
37 posted on 04/16/2011 10:39:27 AM PDT by RJR_fan ("Be kind to every person you meet. For every person is fighting a great battle." St. Ephraim)
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To: austingirl

Well, ‘twas only my reasonably humble opinion, anyway!
Cheers,
Jim


38 posted on 04/16/2011 12:09:07 PM PDT by gymbeau (Free Tibet! (Limit two per customer))
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To: Theo

this is the only movie ever made from Atlas Shrugged.

Maybe you saw The Fountainhead? And We The Living was made into a movie in Italy...


39 posted on 04/16/2011 12:27:36 PM PDT by RobFromGa
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To: RobFromGa

Yeah, that must’ve been it. Maybe I’ll give Atlas Shrugged a chance, then. Fountainhead was painful to watch.


40 posted on 04/16/2011 12:48:22 PM PDT by Theo (May Rome decrease and Christ increase.)
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To: sueuprising

Rand was more pro-individual, than pro-capitalist. She abhorred the big government style crony capitalism that we see today.


41 posted on 04/16/2011 12:55:42 PM PDT by Eva
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To: Yo-Yo
Any FReeper movie reviews yet? My 18 year old son saw it yesterday and said it was awesome. Reviews have said that it stinks. Rotten Tomatoes gives it a 5 out of 100 on the Tomatometer.

Saw it earlier today. I thought it was great. Ebert and the rest of the Leftist movie reviewers are ALWAYS going to add or subtract stars based on the political correctness or incorrectness of the movie, and Atlas is about as politically-incorrect as you get.

It opened on 300 screens (rather than the originally projected 50) and Box Office Mojo has it doing very well on a "revenue per screen" basis. I expect to see it in wide release next week if the gross for the whole weekend turns out like the Friday gross.

42 posted on 04/16/2011 1:02:44 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 ("It is only when we've lost everything, that we are free to do anything" -- Fight Club)
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To: Nickname
Yeah the “experts” are panning it while, from what I gather thus far, audiences are liking it.

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen got panned by reviewers (Ebert panned it with 1 star, as did Rotten Tomatoes), probably over the way the movie dissed the Obama administration, and went on to earn $402million in domestic ticket sales and another $434M in foreign sales.

This is why I come to FR for movie reviews instead of paying attention to the "professionals".

43 posted on 04/16/2011 1:18:39 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 ("It is only when we've lost everything, that we are free to do anything" -- Fight Club)
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To: austingirl

“Dances With Wolves”.


44 posted on 04/16/2011 4:57:30 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Tzfat
OOps. Good thing I did not try and spell Dagny or Ellsworth.
45 posted on 04/16/2011 7:24:37 PM PDT by mmercier
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To: RJR_fan

Haven’t read it and I guess I won’t bother.


46 posted on 04/16/2011 7:39:33 PM PDT by austingirl
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To: RobFromGa
And We The Living was made into a movie in Italy...

And a fine one. It starred a young, handsome Rossano Brazzi and the ever-luminous Alida Valli.

Made in wartime Italy as two movies without Rand's knowledge, it was soon supressed by the Fascists, when it dawned on them how close to home their theme struck. Then they were lost for over a generation before prints were located and re-edited into one film in the 80's, under Rand's supervision.

47 posted on 04/16/2011 11:05:16 PM PDT by Erasmus (I love "The Raven," but then what do I know? I'm just a poetaster.)
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