Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Rising Food Costs Mean there’s Gold in your Garden
The How Do Gardener ^ | May 5, 2011 | Rick Bickling

Posted on 05/08/2011 2:22:00 PM PDT by orsonwb

Unless you haven’t eaten in the past several months, or you already grow all of your own produce, you’ve probably noticed that food prices have been rising dramatically. According to the USDA, the average cost to the U.S. consumer of Lettuce is up 4.5%, and fresh Tomatoes are up 4.7% from the same time last year. The recently released U.S. Labor Department consumer price index survey reports that the price of grains such as corn, wheat and soybeans has roughly doubled since last summer...

(Excerpt) Read more at howdogardener.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Food; Gardening; Government
KEYWORDS: biofuel; gardening; inflation; population
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-89 next last

1 posted on 05/08/2011 2:22:03 PM PDT by orsonwb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Oh yeah rising food cost is such a huge boon...


2 posted on 05/08/2011 2:27:38 PM PDT by Tempest (Ruining the day of corporate butt kissers everywhere.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb
I'm sure the government, with the tacit agreement of both political parties, will find a way to screw seniors out of a Social Security COLA again this year (which will freeze my rat-a** govt pension also.)
3 posted on 05/08/2011 2:38:31 PM PDT by Ciexyz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

I seldom do the shopping, but when wife was out of town in early March I had to. I discovered that the local grocer was getting $2.50 for leaf lettuce. For the first time I decided to plant lettuce, and I now have about sixty plants, forty of which I am now harvesting from. It grows like a weed, and tastes better than the stuff you get at the grocery. Unfortunately, the Texas heat will soon require that I make a final harvest of this season’s crop fairly soon. But I can replant again in September, and I fully intend to.


4 posted on 05/08/2011 3:03:22 PM PDT by Skepolitic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

at least you get social security. At the rate this country is going all my generation will get a free pass to the suicide booth.


5 posted on 05/08/2011 3:10:26 PM PDT by utherdoul
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

Garden list ping?


6 posted on 05/08/2011 3:24:07 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...

Ring-a-Ding to the Weekly Gardening Ping List


7 posted on 05/08/2011 3:37:04 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

Plant some heat tolerant tomatoes, if you can keep them watered, more bang for the buck and more ways to use tomatoes.


8 posted on 05/08/2011 3:41:25 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

Who needs lettuce?

When the maters, cukes, peppers and onions come in, our family eats salad made of these and nothing else but vinaigrette.

Yum!


9 posted on 05/08/2011 3:51:04 PM PDT by Califreak (You can't go swimming in a baseball pool)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

As long s you can keep the critters out of the garden!! Something is pulling my plants down from underground including garlic and onions!!

We think it may be a chipmunk.

And I’ve given up on swiss chard because something is getting over my fencing and scarfing that down as soon as I plant it.

We have already paid for our farm share this year, so thats like money in the bank.


10 posted on 05/08/2011 3:56:12 PM PDT by KosmicKitty (WARNING: Hormonally crazed woman ahead!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

4% increase? I think NOT! Last year, I could buy a whole bag of tomatoes. This year, I either leave the store without any or just buy one. Ha, that’s going to come to a halt any day when my garden tomatoes ripen. Going to be eating squash any day, too. In fact, I’m eating spinach right now from the garden.

There was this thread a few days ago - “Prices at LDS canneries show inflation for food up between 11 and 49%”

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2706902/posts?page=24


11 posted on 05/08/2011 3:58:58 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Living in apartments, even with patios and outdoor spaces, makes it difficult for some to grow their own. And some landlords frown on the attempts to be self-sufficient. What a shame.


12 posted on 05/08/2011 4:03:34 PM PDT by tob2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: KosmicKitty
I read on a garden website to put curling ribbon 1-2 ft strips on stakes about every 4-5 feet. This seems to make a noise that most animals don't like and usually stay out of your garden
13 posted on 05/08/2011 4:04:06 PM PDT by freedommom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

Same here. I just got back from taking the neighbors some lettuces, onions, and spinach. We hadn’t gardened in a few years but with the economy we put one this year. Start up costs were a couple of cattle panels, t-posts, seeds, and tomato plants. We may break even with this year’s harvest but after that it’ll be close to free.


14 posted on 05/08/2011 4:07:56 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: tob2

For those with limited space; consider Earth Boxes, global buckets, smart pots, or a small raised bed.


15 posted on 05/08/2011 4:09:09 PM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

Just give the lettuce a hair cut and they’ll keep producing a continuous harvest for you. Same with all leafy greens. Also, same with onions, just cut the green tops and they’ll keep growing.


16 posted on 05/08/2011 4:12:51 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: who knows what evil?; tob2

Also for those with limited outdoor space, try mushrooms. The legal kind! I’ve been wanting to try them in a closet but have enough stored to last a while.

If nothing else, grow some herbs on a windowsill. Those little things are one of the highest priced foodstuffs in the grocery store.


17 posted on 05/08/2011 4:18:35 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

I got my garden in too, but if we don’t get rain soon here in East Texas most of my garden will die. I’d say 40% of the grass is already dead in the yard. I’m spot watering the garden trying to keep it going. We need rain badly here.


18 posted on 05/08/2011 4:20:25 PM PDT by jpsb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb
Rising Food Costs Mean there’s Gold in your Garden

Two thoughts.
Since food and energy are not essential parts of consumers' financial burden they are not counted for inflation adjustment for real Social Security recipients (as opposed to the larger welfare recipients of SS,) it doesn't matter. So expect an Executive Order taxing home grown food.
And don't even think think about producing your own ethanol...

19 posted on 05/08/2011 4:20:40 PM PDT by Publius6961 (There has Never been a "Tax On The Rich" that has not reached the middle class)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Before I can get gold out of my potential garden, I have to get the poison hemlock out.


20 posted on 05/08/2011 4:21:45 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (We kneel to no prince but the Prince of Peace)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Skepolitic

Shade it and you can keep it going a bit longer.


21 posted on 05/08/2011 4:22:41 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (We kneel to no prince but the Prince of Peace)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic; Red_Devil 232

Thanks for the ping RD.

Thanks for the proto-ping AFTR.


22 posted on 05/08/2011 4:23:23 PM PDT by fanfan (Why did they bury Barry's past?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232; Skepolitic
Plant some heat tolerant tomatoes, if you can keep them watered, more bang for the buck and more ways to use tomatoes.

Very heat tolerant they will need to be. :-)

Right now, in San Antonio, the temp is 97 degrees with an overnight low of 73 forecasted. Tomorrow we expect to hit 98 degrees.

Forecast for the next ten day is . . . depressing. The local organic gardening guru seems to think we might catch a break in June. Sure hope his crystal ball is crystal clear!

23 posted on 05/08/2011 4:25:27 PM PDT by Racehorse (Always preach the Gospel . . . . Use words if necessary.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Found this today and it seems relevant here.

“Talks on Manures” by Joseph Harris

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/19448

Pretty lengthy discussion on natural fertilizer from the 1919 era.

Did not read it all yet, but am will. Pretty sensible discussion.


24 posted on 05/08/2011 4:33:42 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Don’t think I’m going to plant much corn, wheat, and soybeans in my backyard.

I long for a government that actually does something to help the American public.


25 posted on 05/08/2011 4:34:40 PM PDT by popdonnelly (Democrats = authoritarian socialists)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb

Already tired of eating the raddishes I grew. Got squash coming out my ears. About to start freezing some. Green beans, okra and corn are blooming. Purple hull peas looking good. Tomato plants are loaded down with green tomatoes.

When I started this garden I figured I was doing it for a hobby. But with food prices going through the roof it looks like I’m actually saving money.


26 posted on 05/08/2011 4:55:49 PM PDT by Terry Mross (Only a SECOND party will get my vote....maybe.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jpsb

I have a sprinkler system. I’ll water the garden and let the grass die. I’m not paying over a hundred a month for water so my lawn will look pretty.

For tomatoes try molding some wet newspaper over the top of the racks, if you use racks. If not, put up some chicken wire. It’ll keep the birds from eating them. Then put wet newspaper over the top and “mold” it to fit. It’ll stay on and shade the plant during the middle of the day.


27 posted on 05/08/2011 5:03:06 PM PDT by Terry Mross (Only a SECOND party will get my vote....maybe.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

No gold until Fall; right now it is just full of green $prouts.


28 posted on 05/08/2011 5:42:54 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Made in America, by proud American citizens, in 1946.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: who knows what evil?
For those with limited space; consider Earth Boxes, global buckets, smart pots

Or, for those with less money, and more creativity, try the "found items" equivalents.

29 posted on 05/08/2011 5:49:58 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Made in America, by proud American citizens, in 1946.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: who knows what evil?

We cut into the hillside behind our house and put in 7 - soon 8 raised beds. We’ve got the cooler-weather veggies in and they are coming up. I paid $1.78 for one lone red pepper yesterday! It’s being split between two different recipes.

I’ve got about 20 pepper plants started. I hope to have fresh peppers and later, a bunch in the freezer.


30 posted on 05/08/2011 6:33:31 PM PDT by sneakers ("Obama is like the dog that chased a car and caught it. Now he doesn't know what to do with it.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: jpsb

I’m in East Texas, too (Gregg County) and we’re already having to supplement with hay for the horses.


31 posted on 05/08/2011 6:49:20 PM PDT by Texas Mulerider (Rap music: hieroglyphics with a beat.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232; Skepolitic

And there is no comparison between store bought and home grown tomatoes.


32 posted on 05/08/2011 7:05:37 PM PDT by agrace
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: bgill
Those little things are one of the highest priced foodstuffs in the grocery store.

You got that right. It's amazing what our local chain wants for a little container of herbs. Thankfully I have two extremely healthy chive bunches, beautiful oregano in 3 spots, parsley returning from last year, and 10 separate basil sprout squares sunning in my daughter's room. I'll get cilantro and dill in a few weeks for pots on the deck.

Fresh herbs are stupid expensive in the store, but are the easiest thing in the world to grow. Just stick chives and oregano in with your flower beds and enjoy them forever. There's nothing like fresh picked oregano, basil and chives, and if you want to cook with them all year, throw them in the food processor with a little olive oil, separate by tablespoon onto plastic wrap, twist tie them up individually, ziploc them by type and store them in the freezer.

33 posted on 05/08/2011 7:14:27 PM PDT by agrace
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb
Living in a place like Alaska has its own set of problems. Our short growing season and summer climate preclude growing much of anything beyond leafy and root vegetables and berries for fruit. Anything else we manage to wrench from the ground usually is the result of greenhouse growing or the incredibly resourceful tendency for Alaskans to specialize in "Experimental" gardening. Containers help, as does finding the "mini-climates" around the house.

But, by and large, everything else is shipped in, even more so from September through June.

34 posted on 05/08/2011 9:42:50 PM PDT by redhead (Get the GOVERNMENT out of our BUSINESS!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TASMANIANRED
Before I can get gold out of my potential garden, I have to get the poison hemlock out.

Try Bonide Vine and Stump Killer.

I used it in the fall; applied directly to fresh stump/cut or even a leaf. It is very targeted - absorbed down to the roots, but leaves nearby by plants alone.

I was able to remove an aggressive wild vine type rose that the birds gifted right next to a heritage lilac and a huge thistle with a deep tap root right in the midst of a flower garden successfully. The lilac and rest of the flower garden were untouched. Also used on small trees and uninvited aggressive honeysuckle. Personally I would not spray for fear of unintended consequences.
35 posted on 05/09/2011 5:35:18 AM PDT by algernonpj (He who pays the piper . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: freedommom

Thanks, I’ll give that a try.


36 posted on 05/09/2011 5:49:28 AM PDT by KosmicKitty (WARNING: Hormonally crazed woman ahead!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: orsonwb; tdscpa; JustaDumbBlonde; Oberon; Dacula; Black Agnes
FREE SEED EXCHANGE

Thrifty? Gifty? Curious? Generous? Spare seeds? Rare seeds? For a tiny plot? Or a flower- pot?

Send seeds? Befriend seeds? Just want 10 seeds?

If you have garden seeds you can offer other FReepers for free, for a SASE, and/or in exchange for other seeds, please send me your info. (Private Message Mrs. Don-o) and I will add you to this list, which I will post on the garden thread from time to time. Please also Private Message me to be removed when you no longer have the seeds to offer. FReepo-seedoholics can contact each other by Private Message to arrange any transactions.

Remember that old seeds may have reduced germination. (Although I’ve had great luck with them. And for free, you can't lose...) If possible, list year and variety.

Mrs. Don-o

I CAN OFFER a few of these seeds (say, 10) for free to anybody who wants to send me a SASE:
Basil (“Genovese” 2010)
Beans (“Jackson Wonder Butterbean “2011)
Beans (“Southern Zipper Cream” – actually a Cowpea)
Broccoli (“Bonanza” 2011) Chard (“Bright Lights” 2010)
Fennel (“Florence” 2011)
Kale (“Redbor Hybrid” 2010)
Squash (“Acorn 2009”… and I had really good germination with it, this year!)
Squash “(Georgia Candy Roaster” 2011.. a terrific winter squash!)
Tomato (“Brandy Boy” 2011)

INTERESTED IN
Seeds for Fall, e.g. Japanese radish
Anything (surprise me!)


I HAVE HEIRLOOM TOMATO SEEDS (FREEPER TDSCPA) from about 75 popular, open-pollinated heirloom varieties. Tell me via PM what varieties you’re interested in, and if I have them I could send you a few seeds (10?) if you will send me a SASE.

Don’t know what variety to grow? I can make suggestions, if you want to grow plants from seed. Contact Tdscpa


If anyone needs or wants okra seeds (says JustaDumbBlonde)… please let me know. I saved a ridiculous amount in the fall of 2010. Two different varieties, Clemson and Jade, are both are heirloom variety so that you will be able to save seeds from your plants. Both are spineless and heavy producers. Jade is a bit darker green than Clemson and the pods are a bit shorter and fatter. Both are good for frying, soups, freezing, dehydrating or canning. Don’t be shy, l have more than plenty to share! Tip for planting okra: soak your seeds for 24 hours before planting. Okra seeds are hard like peppercorns and soaking will assist in quicker germination. Contact JustaDumbBlonde


I have some black-seeded Simpson lettuce seeds and some Buttercrunch lettuce seeds if anyone’s interested. (says Oberon), And... anybody have any Gold Nugget yellow cherry tomato seeds? I’m interested. Contact Oberon


I have about 100 Canna seeds that I would be glad to share (says Dacula), These plants are tropical and last up to the first frost. I live north of Atlanta and my cannas grow up to 6 feet and have beautiful flowers. I leave them in the ground over winter, but you can take the bulbs and over winter them. . In order to get the seeds to germinate, you have to lightly sand the outside of the seed and soak them overnight. Contact Dacula


Free Winter Squash or Stevia seeds or Heirloom Tomato/Pepper Seeds (says Black Agnes) The 'Patio Marconi' seeds are container peppers that are sweet and good for salads, sandwiches or frying. Open pollinated if that interests you. Cilantro seeds too. It's good used fresh to detox heavy metals. Contact Black Agnes



37 posted on 05/09/2011 6:16:00 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Gardeners abhor a vacuum.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Califreak

I have a whole bunch of cukes the size of my ring finger, the tomatoes have blooms, the pepper is still standing there, and it looks like it’s trying to bloom. The mixed salad is coming along just fine and I’m putting more seed in another “swimming pool” for more salad greens. We just keep snipping and the greens keep growing. The onions are just the right size, but we’re leaving some in the ground so see how big they’ll get.


38 posted on 05/09/2011 6:25:57 AM PDT by tillacum (God Bless our Wonderful Military Personnel. Always on guard for our safety.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: KosmicKitty

We trapped a racoon in the corn garden, the rascal pulled up two corn stalks and took one very small acorn squash from the plant. He was taken about 10 miles from here and released.


39 posted on 05/09/2011 6:29:05 AM PDT by tillacum (Osama now rests with 72 virgins and obama has 72 versions of the raid.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: agrace; bgill

It was buying culinary herbs that got me started last year on my first vegetable patch ever. I was totally blown away when I tasted my home grown basil for the first time. Hooked now.


40 posted on 05/09/2011 6:49:34 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: agrace; bgill

It was buying culinary herbs that got me started last year on my first vegetable patch ever. I was totally blown away when I tasted my home grown basil for the first time. Hooked now.


41 posted on 05/09/2011 6:49:41 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Bigg Red

Agreed, it’s amazing. I was weeding yesterday and accidentally broke some new oregano and the smell, just incredible. We’re putting in a raised garden for the first time ourselves this year. We’ve always had tomato plants and herbs but never a dedicated garden. I’m frightened by my own excitement. :)


42 posted on 05/09/2011 7:10:11 AM PDT by agrace
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: tillacum

I’ve got three rows of collards, three rows of chard, and four rows of lettuces of various kinds... we’ve got more green leafies than any six families can eat. With regard to the chard and the collards, we need to start doing the blanche-and-freeze boogie.


43 posted on 05/09/2011 7:11:25 AM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: jpsb

“but if we don’t get rain soon here in East Texas most of my garden will die”

My family has struggled to keep gardens alive in south east Texas for 40 plus years. Every type of sprinkler set up we tried met with limited sucess-untill this year. I realize this sounds too simple, but we went out and bought a good quality (CLOTH) soaker hose. So far we have been nothing but hot dry and extremely windy-BUT we have the best looking garden i have ever seen so far.


44 posted on 05/09/2011 7:33:43 AM PDT by crude77
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: crude77

I took two old hoses and drilled holes in them trying to make a soaker, I might have to just buy a real soaker. How often do you use yours and how long to you leave it on?

thanks


45 posted on 05/09/2011 7:45:35 AM PDT by jpsb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: agrace
And there is no comparison between store bought and home grown tomatoes.

Store tomatoes should come with warning labels.

"Warning,these tomatoes might be hard and taste like cardboard."

My wife won't buy them.

46 posted on 05/09/2011 8:51:26 AM PDT by painter (No wonder democrats don't mind taxes.THEY DON'T PAY THEM !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: jpsb

We watered our entire garden with it about 2-1/2 weeks ago and we let it go untill the middles were nice and wet. Then we cultivated and hoed crabgrass. Now we are using it again and just giving the tops of the rows a good soaking. Right now we have corn, cream and blackeyed peas, tomatoes, potatoes, pinto beans, onions, squash, cukes, collards, broccli and brussell sprouts and okra. Everything is nice dark green in color. Looks really lush and healthy.


47 posted on 05/09/2011 9:05:42 AM PDT by crude77
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: tillacum

I would have added the raccoon to the menu. LOL


48 posted on 05/09/2011 10:27:18 AM PDT by Augie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: jpsb

I’m with you on the needing rain. I’m hand watering the garden. The only part of the lawn grass that is alive is what gets the water from the washer drain so that leaves 95% of the gras dead.

Fresh strawberries were on sale today for $1/lb and fresh cauliflower for 99 cents/each so grabbed several for the freezer (no room!). They never did restock the 50 cent green beans and peas but I snagged the last 8 cans of corn so this may be the last of the cheap canned veggies.

HEB here has a new gimmick where they’re posting the price... after the coupon is applied. They got me a while back on their sausage by posting the lb price for package rather than the whole package price like every other sausage is labelled. Well, I saw the “after coupon price” on everything but the dog food so they messed me over on that, ggrrrrrrr. It’s bad enough when they claim to supposedly be conveniently out of stock on advertized specials but this sneaky shelf pricing is really underhanded and slimy. But when they’re the only store in town, they think they can get by with it. Not a happy customer.


49 posted on 05/09/2011 10:44:13 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: sneakers

I looked longingly at a pepper in the grocery store today but forced myself to pass it by. They’re just too expensive. At the beginning of the season I refused to buy expensive transplants so tried to start some from seed. The first batch didn’t germinate but the second try was the trick. I transplanted them out into the garden the other day so hopefully they’ll take hold and not burn up with this August-like temperatures.


50 posted on 05/09/2011 10:49:56 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-89 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson