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Ten Things Update: 2011
Market-Ticker ^ | 6/10/11 | Karl Denninger

Posted on 06/10/2011 9:23:14 AM PDT by Kartographer

Be prepared to "shelter in place" or "bug out" as appropriate. "Wilding" events have already happened in some major cities. This is likely to spread if there is a "fiscal" or "monetary" accident and the "FSA" (free **** army) funds get cut off. These events could spread very quickly, and many large cities could go near-feral within days. You need to know what you're going to do about that if it happens. If you think it can't, you're wrong - it both can and might. Being prepared costs nothing. Being unprepared might cost you your life. Consider walking down the average city street with 10-story apartment buildings on both sides while carrying a bag of groceries. How many rifle barrels can be hidden behind those windows, pointed at your head? Now consider what happens when the residents in those places have no food, no money, and you've got a bag of groceries. Still comfortable walking down that street? That's what I thought. Incidentally, being "macho" (or even armed to the teeth) does you absolutely no good in such a situation; the only means of avoiding that problem is not being there if it happens.

You already have the lawful means of self-defense, right? If not, there's still time to solve that problem, but remember: The means of lawful self-defense does not automatically confer skill in the use of same. The police exist to come take a report and zip you into a bag under normal circumstances. If the "wildings" get more-prevalent they may dispense with the report and shift to Hefty for the bag. Think about that long and hard folks; it's not hyperbole.

(Excerpt) Read more at market-ticker.org ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; Society
KEYWORDS: banglist; bhoeconomy; bugout; buygold; buysilver; cw2; cwii; deathofthedollar; debt; default; denninger; economicdisaster; economicdoomsday; economicwoes; economy; getreadyhereitcomes; greatestdepression; greatrecession; nobama2012; obamadepression; obamanomics; preparedness; preparenow; preppers; prepping; qe; shtf; survival; survivalism; survivalping; teachers; ticker; tshtf; urbansurvival
Some good advice here.
1 posted on 06/10/2011 9:23:17 AM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

If you haven’t already it’s time to prepare. You needed to be stocking up on food guns, ammo, basic household supplies like soap, papergoods, cleaning supplies, good sturdy clothes including extra socks, underwear and extra shoes and boots, a extra couple changes of oil and filters for your car, tools, things you buy everyday start buying two and put one up.

I think that we are at the very least in for a collapse much like that of Argentina’s ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yerKMQc7-w&feature=grec_index), but as a armed society with a very large entitlement minded population our collapse will be much more violent and I see many many small business wiped out by flash mob looting, and large scale violence (look at what happened just this past Memorial Day weekend)and then there is this is going on in Chicago:”Emanuel said he spoke with McCarthy over the weekend and again this morning about the situation. The mayor said the city’s reputation as a safe place to work and shop downtown is being endangered by the thuggery. Many of the attacks are happening near the biggest tourist and shopping attractions in the city.

But, CBS 2’s Jim Williams reports, the problem of mob attacks downtown is much bigger than the weekend beatings, according to beat cops who wanted to remain anonymous.”

And it’s not just Chicago most major big ‘Blue’ cities are increasingly reporting such flash mobs and gang muggings.

I see what I call ‘Pocket Pogroms’ taking place in many big ‘Blue’ cities and if you aren’t a “0bamamites’ yute” it’s going to get Reginald Denny bad for you very quickly.

For those who haven’t prepared and would like to start or for those that have and are just interested you may download my Preparedness Manual at:

http://www.tomeaker.com/kart/preparedness1i.pdf

As the LDS say “When the emergency is upon us the time for preparedness has past.”

Or as the bible says: A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it.
NIV Proverbs 22:3


2 posted on 06/10/2011 9:25:24 AM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

I have lived in larger communities during my life. At this time in our nations’ history I am very happy and relieved to be residing on a farm in the middle of BFE.

Didn’t get the garden in this year however (money wasn’t there once we found out the missus is pregnant) but nearby friends have a large garden and we have chickens for eggs so we can barter with ‘em.


3 posted on 06/10/2011 9:31:27 AM PDT by Grunthor (Make the lefts' collective brain cell implode; Cain/Bolton 2012.)
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To: Kartographer

” Some good advice here. “

Specifically —

” Incidentally, being “macho” (or even armed to the teeth) does you absolutely no good in such a situation; the only means of avoiding that problem is not being there if it happens. “

Certainly more realistic than the “Horatius at the Bridge” fantasies of some of our number...


4 posted on 06/10/2011 9:34:10 AM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: Kartographer

iPing


5 posted on 06/10/2011 9:37:50 AM PDT by Bush_Democrat (ATLAS SHRUGGED was supposed to be a warning, NOT a newspaper.)
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To: Kartographer

KArl may or may not be ‘right’ - but living in a “big” city anytime is like a slow-motion riot.

IF you really want a glimpse of bad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWc27aeQzu0

and read about using a search string of
“living in sarajevo” or a variant.

I would suggest that if you believe such a thing will happen, today is the day to start your move. Becasue tomorrow may be too late....


6 posted on 06/10/2011 9:39:19 AM PDT by ASOC (What are you doing now that Mexico has become OUR Chechnya?)
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To: Kartographer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyZuvLo4eJA

Apocalypse Man


7 posted on 06/10/2011 9:47:31 AM PDT by Amerikan_Samurai
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To: Kartographer
I see many many small business wiped out by flash mob looting, and large scale violence (look at what happened just this past Memorial Day weekend)

There may very well be more wiped out due to the drought. In many counties in Texas there has been a burn ban in effect for months. With unusual high winds, a drought situation, and temperatures around 100 for two months it's a tinderbox. Many counties are now banning fireworks and are considering banning the sale of fireworks. While I totally agree with the bannings, it would hit the people who are depending on the income from their roadside stands.

8 posted on 06/10/2011 9:59:36 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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.


9 posted on 06/10/2011 9:59:42 AM PDT by loungitude ( The truth hurts.)
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To: melancholy

Remind me again what keyword/s to use!

Even Denninger sees this writing on the wall.


10 posted on 06/10/2011 10:10:18 AM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Grunthor
I have lived in larger communities during my life. At this time in our nations’ history I am very happy and relieved to be residing on a farm in the middle of BFE.

Same here. It's the younger folk who can't wait to get to the lights of the big city but they're the least experienced to handle such situations.

You might be surprised how little a garden would cost to put in. Your north enough to not be behind in planting. Borrow your neighbor's tiller for the afternoon. Maybe he also has extra seeds to share with you. Ask others if they have any seeds for sharing or trade eggs. Visit the weekly gardening thread here - http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2732750/posts . Plant trellis growing plants along an already existing fence. Viola! You've got your garden at little to zero expense.

11 posted on 06/10/2011 10:13:56 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: little jeremiah

I wrote them all in that thread.

Here’s one post from which you could follow the rest:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2731741/posts?page=30#30

I also remember: 0ba_mites.


12 posted on 06/10/2011 10:40:38 AM PDT by melancholy (Papa Alinsky, Enslavement Specialist)
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To: melancholy

Got ‘em saved now, thanks.


13 posted on 06/10/2011 10:53:49 AM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Uncle Ike

If you are prepared, you don’t need to go out to the store.

Wisconsin, while nearly ready to approve concealed carry, already has open carry. Wearing a holster while working around your own land is not any sort of inconvenience, just in case someone is thinking about invading a rural homestead.

For those who need to fill in their supplies, many survival sites have canned meat sales this month. Campingsurvival.com is one of these. If you sign up for emails, you will also get discounts each month. These suppliers rotate their sales, so anything you miss will come around again. Just don’t wait too long, especially for the 10-year shelf life items. It is easy to find canned chicken, turkey, tuna and salmon at the big box discounters, but bacon,beef, pork and hamburger are not easy to find in decent sizes with decent shelf life, although I have read that some Walmarts carry 27-oz cans of beef. Ours doesn’t. We are financially stretched, at the moment, so I am simply buying a few cans as we can afford them. They add up. We add to our canned butter and cheese supplies a bit at a time, as well. The price per pound for meat isn’t that much more, considering that there is no waste or shrinkage and you need minimal power to heat the cooked, canned meat. A wood stove top can warm anything, as can a charcoal grill. We just picked up 40 pounds of charcoal for $16, about a $7 savings.

Also, propane cylinders and heaters are still available and affordable. Check out eBay as well as the stores for the heaters. My advice is to avoid Mr. Heater in favor of Coleman. We had to return a Mr. Heater unit, but the Coleman Blackcat with Insta Start works well. Last winter, ours warmed a 9’x18’ room in 15 minutes, with no fan used. A low wattage fan would have perhaps speeded up the warming. The cheap battery camping lanterns ($5) at Walmart are a good deal, provide a lot of light and are safe. If nothing else, this can save on electric and gas bills this winter. Yes, the propane in the cylinders costs more, at the moment, but rates are increasing everywhere, so your storm preps can have everyday utility, if necessary. We always relied on the gas generator to provide power to the propane furnaces in case of a power outage, but at today’s prices, it is more and more difficult to stockpile gasoline.


14 posted on 06/10/2011 12:04:13 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: reformedliberal

The Camco Olympian safety heaters are safer and better, IMO—available in 3,000, 6,000 and 8,000 watts, IIRC.


15 posted on 06/10/2011 4:37:33 PM PDT by familyop (Rome was burned in a day--twice.)
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To: Kartographer
"Consider walking...with 10-story apartment buildings on both sides...when the residents in those places have no food, no money, and you've got a bag of groceries."

That...is...the...utterly...coolest..scenario! Karl has totally outdone himself this time.






16 posted on 06/10/2011 4:38:06 PM PDT by familyop (Rome was burned in a day--twice.)
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To: melancholy

Now I really have them saved.

(I’ve been having more asthma than usual lately and darn it just makes less oxygen in the brain. Or, that’s my latest excuse.)


17 posted on 06/10/2011 4:41:16 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Kartographer

Not to take the seriousness out of the real possibility or probably of the situation. It’s just the way that he wrote it. Semi-auto firearms with high capacities have become really popular with lefty yuppies for about a decade during the zombie movie craze and all. I wonder what those who read Karl’s latest will buy next? ;-)


18 posted on 06/10/2011 4:44:26 PM PDT by familyop (Rome was burned in a day--twice.)
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To: little jeremiah
"Even Denninger sees this writing on the wall."?

He's seen this for several years.

Here's the precursor to this article, written about two years ago:

Ten Things You Must Do.

19 posted on 06/10/2011 5:39:34 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Amerikan_Samurai
"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyZuvLo4eJA

Apocalypse Man
"

LOL! We know that in such a disaster, we're all going to have to cross an open drawbridge and blow good 9-volt batteries on starting fires. Thanks. ;-)

If the SHTF, I'll just let the "experts" do their thing (talk and screw things up) away from me.


20 posted on 06/10/2011 11:36:35 PM PDT by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96)
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To: Kartographer
Remember the first rules from Zombieland. No, not "double tap." Cardio.

LOL. I'm prepping and meet the 10 points. At the same time, I will never be as prepared as I want to be.

My family has worked very hard to stay out of debt and save for old age. There is the big "poof" coming. I know it.

My Daughter (heading off to a safe college in engineering in August) was watching me practice with my ACP. She noticed I was angry. I did not. I just thought I was being focused. It could have been the couple hundred of dollars of brass at my feet. I guess I have much more to think about. I stopped practicing. She is right. I'm very angry. It is obvious what is going to happen.

"Cardio" is good. "Cardio" is primary for the next few years. I suppose a preppers anger is something that is unique. I hear the bravado, but I'm convinced no prepper is really dealing with the "scenario". I think this may require another thread. Maybe even a private thread. My Daughter was right.

A prepper has to continue to live. Right? I prepped to feed many and stop the "zombies". Next? I guess I'm just rambling. Something to think about. Prepping requires to think about what is next.
21 posted on 06/10/2011 11:39:54 PM PDT by PA Engineer (SP/AW12: Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: familyop

A bit spendy for us, at the moment. The Camco 3000 is around $200. I would like one of the larger ones for my shop area.

The Coleman BlackCat w/InstaStart 3000 BTU was $50 on eBay and (IIRC) $75 at Gander Mountain. I use them in the rooms furthest from the wood stove or in the cellar to prevent pipes freezing when it is -18 or below. So, I need multiple heaters.

My shop has very high ceilings with no ceramic chimney, meaning a long stove pipe that can draw to the point of being a fire hazard, so I don’t use wood out there on the top floor. The propane furnace is very efficient, but when/if it goes out I think I could heat up the 25’x50’ work area w/2-3000 BTU propane heaters, if necessary. Haven’t tried that yet, but I know the 1500 watt ceramics do not do the job.

For the price, Coleman makes a decent product. It is also small and easily moved around, if needed. Also, with the small 16oz propane cylinders, they take up very little room.

I was just very impressed that in 15 minutes it heated a 9’x18’ room with a high ceiling to a comfortable level, vs. an electric 1500 watt ceramic heater, which can take over an hour. With an adapter, it can fit a 20# cylinder, as well.

It is also affordable, in the short run,to stockpile the 16 oz cylinders at $5.50/ea. They last 4 hrs on high and 7 hours on low. Easier to move around than the filled larger tanks. I do have 4 of the larger tanks, but they now run about $48/each, with $18 for a refill. I use them in my business, but they are also good for cooking on a simple, relatively inexpensive corn boiler.They last about 25 hours for cooking. BTW, anyone thinking about this will want to put a metal plate over the flame of the boiler to protect their pots and spread out the heat.Keep oven gloves handy and be prepared to keep the entire cooker unit clean, as carbon soot will build up.


22 posted on 06/11/2011 5:26:20 AM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: PA Engineer

I think you are right: we are all angry.

There is also a lot of uncertainty. We could all be prepping for the wrong disaster, but darned if I know exactly what is most likely to happen.

I find that as we fill one area of possible need, we think of 2-3 others where we aren’t as prepared as we would like. Beck keeps emphasizing that we all need to be able to help others, too.

We just keep plugging away at food, heat, power, while trying to live our lives in this long, slow decline. Besides anger, I just experience fatigue and I know it has an emotional basis, more than a physical one.

Cardio is essential, and not just to run from the zombies or the thugs, but look around at the older folks and those being kept alive on medications and medical technology or the young children. Cardio is not going to help everyone.


23 posted on 06/11/2011 5:40:16 AM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: reformedliberal
Cardio is essential, and not just to run from the zombies or the thugs, but look around at the older folks and those being kept alive on medications and medical technology or the young children. Cardio is not going to help everyone.

Agree. There are many with many needs. The depression effects are here. In the last year we are now up to over 10 abandoned cats. The majority did not make it through the winter. We rescued and now have placed three. That was the sign that both bothered me and angered me the most.

There is a type of cowardice when people abandon there pets in the "country". This is also a sign of a deep rooted denial. Many Americans are going to behave very badly.

This was one area of preps that took me by surprise. We have prepared to feed others. We prepared for our family and relative's pets. We were not prepared for what happened this past winter.

Our Vet warned us it was not just dogs and cats. Horses and cattle are also being abandoned. I think this is an important sign to watch out for.
24 posted on 06/11/2011 1:21:21 PM PDT by PA Engineer (SP/AW12: Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: Uncle Ike

First way to avoid getting eaten is don’t be in the lion’s den. Second way is to not act like food.

Ultimatly, if 1 or 2 fails, you need to hunt the lion.


25 posted on 06/11/2011 2:06:22 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: PA Engineer
There is a type of cowardice when people abandon there pets in the "country". This is also a sign of a deep rooted denial. Many Americans are going to behave very badly.

I agree. A dog is a dog, but also a member of the family. People are first, but I was raised to take care of our animals just after we take care of our people. If I have to bug out, the terrier goes with us.

But then we had a local woman burn her 3 year old in a BBQ pit because she was bored with her. So abandoning pets is not surprising.

26 posted on 06/11/2011 2:16:19 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: reformedliberal
"A bit spendy for us, at the moment."

That's understandable. We're using the Camco catalytics, because we'll be using them for several years, until we get the drainback solar radiant heating system built (high altitude and over 300 sun days). ...also using one in living quarters for another few months (safety), and it saves us a little propane over time (safer to hook up to a larger tank).

We have about 8 months of winter and some nights down to -35 F with wind gusts over 100 mph.


27 posted on 06/11/2011 3:39:44 PM PDT by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96)
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To: PA Engineer
"Our Vet warned us it was not just dogs and cats. Horses and cattle are also being abandoned. I think this is an important sign to watch out for."

Wow. In my part of the country, no cattle are abandoned. Rustling is more of a problem. As for horses, there are too many of them--more than cattle, it appears. We joke about the unprepared economic cheerleaders feasting on them, if the economy really gets out of hand.

As for dogs, any of those without something like malamute in them would freeze to death pretty quickly up here. Don't see any strays from cities.


28 posted on 06/11/2011 3:45:26 PM PDT by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96)
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To: familyop

Well, I envy you the solar. We are in a valley at 43N, so it just is not practical, here.

We can get -30 at night and also can have 5 months of winter, but the bad stuff is normally 3 months. Bad years can see 3 straight weeks of below zero, though and we have years where it froze in November and didn’t thaw until nearly March. I don’t envy you the gusts, though.


29 posted on 06/11/2011 4:25:26 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: PA Engineer

I hear these sorts of stories, too.

Our beloved canine fur kid was a show up about 11 years ago. He was just a pup. 18 months ago we spent $2k on him after he tore a plantar tendon. There was no question, even though times are very tight for us. Actually, the surgeon and the vet both gave us massive discounts just because they know how important he is to us. He is the official greeter and escort here and is well-known throughout the area with many friends.

I have actually seen fewer abandoned cats the past few years, but that could be the work of the coyotes. We have owls and eagles, too and both predate on cats.

Still, everyone seems nervous, anxious and some are just plain scared. Preps don’t even make that much difference, IMO. I know that some days I am scared to the point where all I want to do is go to sleep. Of course, it passes and then I do some more preps.

Cats are so inexpensive to keep. Of all the domesticated pets, they are the easiest to care for. It seems so senseless to abandon them. Good for you for the rescue work.


30 posted on 06/11/2011 4:35:56 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: reformedliberal; familyop
We also get the dogs, but that is another issue. We may get one or two a year that come for help (they are very easy to adopt), the remainder tend to pack. Once that happens, out local animal control removes them quickly. All domestic pets suffer a death sentence when they are abandoned.

The recent one was the straw that broke the back. We didn't even know she was around until April of this year. I kept telling the family we had a phantom cat. Any noise and she would be off of the porch in a blur. Finally starvation overcame her shyness. She looked terrible. I was feeding her 3 cans of wet and two bowls of dry for two days. On the second day I reached down to pet her and she backed away. Seconds later she dove at my ankles and wrapped her paws around them while head butting. She won.

She was skin and bones at 8lbs. Had ticks all over her head, bitten and torn skin on her back, crumbling whiskers and someone had kicked in two teeth on one side of her mouth. She was a single coat russian blue torte mix and somehow had survived the winter. We got her to the vet, dewormed, ticks removed and did the inoculations all over again. She was up to ten pounds by then. She will be adopted next Friday while I am away. None of our other cats would accept her. That is a shame because she was a completely plug and play pet.

Today she looks great and is up to 22lbs. This is the biggest female cat any of us have seen and behaves like a typical russian blue, including affections. She has about another month to get back to full weight and coat. Here is one of the pictures we just sent to the adopter:



All of our cats but one are abandons. This one really bugged me for some reason. Thanks for letting me share.
31 posted on 06/11/2011 6:44:39 PM PDT by PA Engineer (SP/AW12: Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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