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Is the U.S. Military Heading for a Train Wreck -- Literally -- In Uzbekistan?
Eurasianet ^ | July 3, 2011 - 8:42pm | Joshua Kucera

Posted on 07/04/2011 3:59:51 PM PDT by Pan_Yan

A new railroad in Uzbekistan, used extensively as part of the U.S.'s transportation network shipping military cargo to Afghanistan was built using low-quality steel and goes through such mountainous terrain that when the train gets to the bottom of the mountain crossing, the wheels are glowing red from the friction of so much braking. That's according to a new U.S. diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks and the Washington Post.

The Post published a story today on this transportation system, the Northern Distribution Network, and while readers of this blog won't find much new in it, the Post did publish a few Wikileaked cables in conjunction, and they shed a bit more light on the NDN.

All the cables are from 2009, the early days of the NDN. The juiciest is the one that described the new rail line. The Soviet-era line that ran from Karshi to Termez, on the Afghanistan border, dipped into Turkmenistan. So Uzbekistan built a new line that stays entirely within its territory -- but there was a reason the Soviets routed theirs through Turkmenistan. The alternative is apparently through terrain that is borderline dangerous, according to the U.S. embassy's source, whose identity was redacted, but was someone "heavily involved" in the new rail line's construction

XXXXXXXXXXXX told us that there have been difficulties operating trains over the Karshi-Termez line. Most locomotives used by Uzbek Railroads are built to the same design as U.S. lend-lease locomotives given to the Soviet Union in World War II. Soviet engineers copied this design and used it to produce locomotives that came to form a significant portion of Soviet rolling stock. The problem with Uzbekistan's legacy Soviet locomotives is that they were never intended for use in mountainous terrain. They have inadequate brakes and must be operated at slow speed. On the descents, the brakes in all wagons are applied continuously, thus necessitating frequent stops so that the wheels can cool. XXXXXXXXXXXX told us that by the time trains have descended from the mountains, the wheels are glowing red hot.

The Karshi-Termez line carries Northern Distribution Network (NDN) rail traffic to supply U.S. forces in Afghanistan....

XXXXXXXXXXXX's description of current operations on the Karshi-Termez rail line is cause for concern. XXXXXXXXXXXX underlined this by saying he himself refused to travel on the line under current conditions. His description of wheels that are red hot by the end of the mountain crossing implies that a train wreck is possible in the literal sense.



Another informative cable had been reported on by the Guardian, but not released, and deals with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov's conversation with the then-U.S. ambassador over Washington's human rights award to an Uzbek dissident. While Karimov responded angrily to the award, apparently others in the government believed Karimov overreacted, and the writer of the cable suggested that working around Karimov would thus be useful. It also suggests that -- at least in these cables -- the U.S. is taking the question of human rights in Uzbekistan seriously along with the military cooperation:

Clearly Karimov was concerned that the U.S. had made a policy decision to abandon cooperation with him. Equally clearly, pressuring him (especially publicly) could cost us transit through Uzbekistan into Afghanistan, not to mention the ability to engage on human rights and other issues. What is most interesting is that senior staff around him appear to be letting on to us (for the first time) that they know his behavior can harm Uzbek interests and even contradict those positions which he himself espouses. We should seize this opportunity to engage with these officials in a more structured dialogue. The approach of working around Karimov at the margins may be galling in the face of his intransigence, but ultimately it is likely to get us further on issues across-the-board pending the political succession that inevitably will occur here one of these days.


Another of the cables says that Uzbekistan's rail company "padded" the costs for the Afghanistan railroad it's building with Asian Development Bank money:

On the ADB-funded 70-80 km rail link from Hayraton to Mazar-i-Sharif in Afghanistan, XXXXXXXXXXXX claimed that Uzbek Railways had padded the construction cost by more than a factor of two. Whereas the rule of thumb for railroad construction in the U.S. is $1 million USD per mile, the budget for the new rail line in Afghanistan is $160 million USD. For a line that will not span any major rivers or face other geological impediments, the main challenge will be security, not engineering.


Another cable described First Deputy Prime Minister Rustam Azimov's keen desire for the NDN to economically benefit Uzbekistan, saying that was Uzbekistan's top priority for the NDN:

Switching from Russian to English and strongly emphasizing his next point, Azimov said he appreciates that the President of the United States and Secretary of Defense recognize the price of Uzbekistan's support. He expressed hope that the volume of cargo will increase and benefit the United States as well as bring profit to Uzbekistan....

Uzbekistan will not dictate what the U.S. should buy, and the GOU will respect U.S. procedures and take steps to ensure that there is no such interference. "If purchases don't increase, we'll be concerned," he said, citing a "target figure" of 100 million USD.



Cynics familiar with the tight relationship between the government elite and business in Uzbekistan can interpret this however they wish...

And one last cable -- despite protestations to the contrary -- will certainly fuel suspicion in Moscow and elsewhere that the U.S. is playing a geopolitical "great game" in Central Asia:

Russia's fall from favor in Tashkent is yet another opening that we can exploit to advance our objectives. Without lending support to "great game" theorists through our actions, we have a chance to build constructive relations by supporting the sovereignty of the Central Asian states. Our greatest challenge is to help them build that sovereignty in a way that is sustainable and that moves countries such as Uzbekistan closer to more progressive standards of governance.




TOPICS: Government; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: afghanistan; russia; trains; uzbekistan; wikileaks

1 posted on 07/04/2011 3:59:57 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

Sounds like it would not take all that much to cut off our troops in Afghanistan does it?


2 posted on 07/04/2011 4:13:39 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
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To: Pan_Yan
I think I read a little bit about this in a National Geographic. The whole thing was on the renewing the old silk road with new railroads from the middle east to China. I think they talked about how hazardous this railroad was, it gets EXTREMLY cold in a mountainous area. I felt sorry for the people that live there.
BTW, I am very well aware that National Geographic is MSM and to be wary of political slants. I was bored and read this at work. Very interesting to see the third world making due with what it has.
3 posted on 07/04/2011 4:17:30 PM PDT by nerdwithagun (I'd rather go gun to gun then knife to knife.)
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To: GeronL
Sounds like it would not take all that much to cut off our troops in Afghanistan does it?

We're fighting in a landlocked country with dubious and odorous allies as our only supply lines. The Afghans get their oil from Iran. We get ours by truck convoy through Pakistan. I give great credit to the people who've kept the supplies flowing.

4 posted on 07/04/2011 4:23:54 PM PDT by Pan_Yan (Those that despise people will never get the best out of others and themselves. Tocqueville)
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To: nerdwithagun

I grew up reading National Geographic. Yes, they have a slant. But they still have some of the best photography and cultural writing in the world. I can’t begin to guess how much I learned about dark corners of the world from them.


5 posted on 07/04/2011 4:26:01 PM PDT by Pan_Yan (Those that despise people will never get the best out of others and themselves. Tocqueville)
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To: Pan_Yan

“was built using low-quality steel....”

They should have used Reardon metal.


6 posted on 07/04/2011 4:31:34 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA
They should have used Reardon metal. I was just thinking, this is an Atlas Shrugged moment.
7 posted on 07/04/2011 4:45:08 PM PDT by ArmyTeach (Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain ... Iowa 61)
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

This rail road is just another piece of the fractured fairy tale Presidency.

I think this President is covertly planning a Diem bien Pheu type catastrophe for our military forces. I suspect it’ll involve the sinking of a carrier battle group but will still have that same effect on us that it had on the French Republic back in the 50’s...it be a show stopper.

Once that occurs it’ll be a easy argument to bring troops home all over the world...’for their own safety’. Thus then leaving the peace of the world in the hands of the Chinese, Russians and Indians.

The resulting world wide chaos would gain President BO the needed traction for the socialist overall of our way of life.


8 posted on 07/04/2011 4:52:25 PM PDT by exPBRrat
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To: Pan_Yan
Yeah its landlocked, which wouldn't be a problem except for whose land locks it. Afghanistan is bordered by Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, and Iran. You have to go through Russia to get to Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan. The Russians can cut off this supply line any time they want. The Pakis can cut off supplies from the south.

This is a terrible place to have to supply a western army.

9 posted on 07/04/2011 5:10:26 PM PDT by Former Proud Canadian (We .. have a purpose .. no longer to please every dictator with a vote at the UN. PM Harper)
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To: Pan_Yan

It has been many years indeed since any mountainous railroad line has been built in the US at a cost of $1 million per mile. Makes the whole cable doubtful.


10 posted on 07/04/2011 5:10:38 PM PDT by John Valentine
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To: GeronL

This has been out for awhile.


11 posted on 07/04/2011 5:25:13 PM PDT by Lumper20
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To: Former Proud Canadian

“This is a terrible place to have to supply a western army.”

Exactly what is the strategic imperative for the United States to deploy its military in Afghanistan for over 9 years particularly when millions of illegal immigrants cross the southern US border every year? In the past 9 years up to 20 million invaders have crossed the border and settled in this country taking jobs from citizens and consuming social services funded by the taxpayer. Isn’t it time to bring the troops home to protect the homeland?


12 posted on 07/04/2011 5:34:41 PM PDT by Soul of the South (When times are tough the tough get going.)
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To: Pan_Yan
wreck of old 97
13 posted on 07/04/2011 5:40:31 PM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan ("Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts." Richard Feynman father of Quantum Physics)
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To: Pan_Yan

Uzbeks (SCTV)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hCCCRAcTAA


14 posted on 07/04/2011 5:50:55 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: John Valentine

‘TRAINS’had an article a while back on Iraq’s RR.
In this article it mentions WW2 Soviet(lend lease?) locos.
Guess there are no diesel-electrics with dynamic braking?


15 posted on 07/04/2011 5:51:36 PM PDT by aumrl (let's keep it real Conservatives)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...
Russia's fall from favor in Tashkent is yet another opening that we can exploit to advance our objectives. Without lending support to "great game" theorists through our actions, we have a chance to build constructive relations by supporting the sovereignty of the Central Asian states. Our greatest challenge is to help them build that sovereignty in a way that is sustainable and that moves countries such as Uzbekistan closer to more progressive standards of governance.
Thanks Pan_Yan.


16 posted on 07/04/2011 7:06:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Yes, as a matter of fact, it is that time again -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: aumrl

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=93112&nseq=0

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=90898&nseq=2


17 posted on 07/04/2011 8:03:16 PM PDT by JadeEmperor
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To: JadeEmperor

Thank you for pics.
Electrics and DE


18 posted on 07/05/2011 4:46:02 AM PDT by aumrl (let's keep it real Conservatives)
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To: aumrl
What the original article probably meant is that the DE TEM-2 that one of the pictures shows, was probably originally derived from the ALCO RSD-1 series, that were provided to USSR during Lend-Leas. http://www.berail.be/usa/rs1/index.html
"The Soviet government was impressed with the performance of these Alco 127 ton units in Iran and requested 70 for use in Russia. Accordingly, USA/TC 8600-49/80-99 were built with 5ft 0in gauge bogies for Russia, the last twenty being built before the ones destined for Europe. USA/TC 8621/6/30-49 were landed in Great Britain before transhipment to Russia via the Arctic convoys. USA/TC 8630-40/9 were lost en route. They became Russian SZD Class Da20-1 to 58, presumably standing for "Diesel, American". Russia wanted more of these locomotives in 1946, but this was now politically impossible so the Russians built a copy as their Class TE-1 (except for the cab). Several hundred were built between 1947 and 1950. TEM-1, TEM-2 and TEM-2A were similar types built during the 1960s, and these led to further developments as classes TEM-7 and TEM-12 over the years."

19 posted on 07/05/2011 5:22:24 AM PDT by JadeEmperor
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To: JadeEmperor

The VL80 seems to be indigenous

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VL80

But I don’t know if this route can be reliably supplied with electric power, given the harsh environmental conditions.

So maybe DE is the only one they can use...


20 posted on 07/05/2011 5:25:35 AM PDT by JadeEmperor
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To: JadeEmperor

thanx 4 info
whose 6 wheel trucks?


21 posted on 07/05/2011 5:26:13 PM PDT by aumrl (let's keep it real Conservatives)
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To: JadeEmperor

I’ll bet GE would be happy to sell them some new ones.


22 posted on 07/05/2011 5:27:42 PM PDT by aumrl (let's keep it real Conservatives)
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To: aumrl
"whose 6 wheel trucks?"
I am not sure I follow.
23 posted on 07/05/2011 7:42:21 PM PDT by JadeEmperor
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