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Survival Preparedness Food Preps, Ingredients versus Prepared Foods
Modern Survival Blog ^ | 8/22/11

Posted on 08/22/2011 6:50:37 PM PDT by Kartographer

You need to start stocking food. You can do a lot if you start early. Unfortunately, “early” might have been yesterday. Now we’re way past early, and you need a reasonable plan to get food supplies that will store well and don’t cost too much.

Buy extra, use FIFO. Go ahead and buy more food than normal when you’re out shopping, and set it aside as preparedness. Use the “first in, first out” rule to eat your older supplies first. Keep rotating your supplies so you never abandon food “way in the back.”

(Excerpt) Read more at modernsurvivalblog.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Food; Society
KEYWORDS: botulinum; civilwar; cowcreek; flashmobs; mudpuddle; preppers; purification; putresine; survival; urine
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Personal I have a mix, but I am heavy into ingredients in my true preparedness 'stash', I do have chili, beef stew and a few other prepared foods, but I have plenty of that sort of stuff in my regular pantry that I can depend on.

My stash is heavy on spices, sauces, gravies, dehydrated, peppers of various types, onions. We have gotten use to a highly varied diet and food fatigue should be a real concern. Face for many of us you could tell the day of the week by what Mom was cooking (Meatloaf Monday, northern beans and corn bread Tuesday, Wednesday chicken or maybe beef and noodles, Thursday pinto beans and fried potatoes, Friday fish usually the cheap bulk fish sticks, Saturday hamburgers, Sunday fried chick) and we were fine with that, but now days it isn't only the kids that can look into a full 'frig' or pantry and see nothing to eat. Do yourself a favor and pack away things that when added to you basics will keep the everyday interesting and palatable.

1 posted on 08/22/2011 6:50:39 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

PING!


2 posted on 08/22/2011 6:52:17 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Kart - can you add me to your prepper ping, please? Thanks :-)


3 posted on 08/22/2011 6:54:52 PM PDT by justsaynomore (Herman Cain 2012 - http://www.arealleader.com)
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To: Kartographer

yep!! Variety is the spice of life, and spice can definitely enhance life...great point to make, and yet another layer for folks to consider as they continue to build that stash and wonder what would be good to put up next.

I just finished smoking and dehydrating the first batch of this year’s garden Ancho peppers. They are just outstanding to rehydrate and flavor any pot full of beans...


4 posted on 08/22/2011 6:56:46 PM PDT by Bean Counter (The promise given was a necessity of the past: the promise broken is a necessity of the present.)
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To: Kartographer

Know your area. It’s not ideal but it can keep you alive. All zones have their unique survival fauna. Chit hits the fan there is no telling how low or long it’s going to go.


5 posted on 08/22/2011 6:57:43 PM PDT by allmost
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To: Kartographer
From my Preparedness manual:

From a Sarajevo War Survivor:
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy - it makes a lot of the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only needs enough heat to "warm", not to cook. It's cheap too, especially if you buy it in bulk.
6 posted on 08/22/2011 6:59:34 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
save
7 posted on 08/22/2011 7:01:57 PM PDT by tomkat (sic semper tyrranis .. literally)
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To: Kartographer

It’s clear as a bell that at the very least a Double Dip is coming up and I ain’t talk’n roller coaster or Baskin Robbins!

I think that we are in for something like the collapse of Argentina ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yerKMQc7-w&feature=grec_index)but from the look of things it may even be on a global scale. Additionally I think we will see a much more violent version. As recent events show (Flash Mobs, UK riots, etc)we have a larger entitlement minded population and a the US has a much more violent and armed population than Argentina. I see many many small business wiped out by flash mob looting, and see rape, robbery and murder for murder sake. Many of these ‘yutes’ will think no more about killing you than most people think about stepping on a roach. That will be the test of many. Most preppers I know are Christian people and they will hesitate to do what they might have to do to stop the ‘yutes’. On the other hand the ‘yutes’ won’t think twice nor lose a minute of sleep, in fact they will smile and laugh about it.

Think of this quote which is one of my favorites:

“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Siege of AR-558 (#7.8)” (1998)
Quark: Let me tell you something about Hew-mons, Nephew. They’re a wonderful, friendly people, as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people... will become as nasty and as violent as the most bloodthirsty Klingon. You don’t believe me? Look at those faces. Look in their eyes.

Now go look at some of the videos of the riots in the UK and of some of the flash mobs here in the US and look into there eyes.

For those who are just starting or are old hands at prepping you may find my Preparedness Manual helpfull. You can download it at:

http://www.tomeaker.com/kart/preparedness1i.pdf

For those of you who haven’t started already it’s time to prepare almost past time maybe. You needed to be stocking up on food guns, ammo, basic household supplies like soap, papergoods, cleaning supplies, good sturdy clothes including extra socks, underwear and extra shoes and boots, a extra couple changes of oil and filters for your car, tools, things you buy everyday start buying two and put one up.

As the LDS say “When the emergency is upon us the time for preparedness has past.”

Or as the bible says: A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it.
NIV Proverbs 22:3

Lastly this for the doubters and the scoffers.

“There is no greater disaster than to underestimate danger.

Underestimation can be fatal.”


8 posted on 08/22/2011 7:04:12 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy

Canned gravy will kill anyone that is not a longhaul trucker, military, nurse or a construction worker.

Best to make your own with a couple table spoons of flour, oil and a little black pepper. It's not that hard to make and homemade gravy won't give you the indigestion that canned gravy will. ;)

9 posted on 08/22/2011 7:12:17 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer
My plan, not the ideal l I'm sure, is beans, wheat, rice, and oats. Lots of canned seasonings (tomatoes, corn, Spam), and hard candy. Not the ideal and perhaps worst plan, IMO, is the "I have an acre and plenty of non hybrid seeds. I can put up enough for our family and friends" plan. Please.

10 posted on 08/22/2011 7:14:30 PM PDT by I see my hands (Keep your sunny side up!)
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To: Kartographer

Lots of peanut butter. It keeps a long time, is nutritious and tastes good on crackers - which also are good keepers.


11 posted on 08/22/2011 7:17:33 PM PDT by alicewonders
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To: Kartographer

Should also start buying things you don’t usually think of like powdered milk, canned milk, vitamin supplements, silica gel, powdered eggs, clorox, aspirin, dried fruit and beans. There are so many imaginative things you can think of. A little at a time adds up. If you have a water supply like a stream or river, the clorox will kill just about anything. Chewing tobacco is great for things like ringworm, poison ivy/oak, almost any kind of rash. Baking soda and vinegar. Epsom salts. I could probably list a million things and you would be surprised at how many uses there are for each one. Raw lemon juice will repel ants. Okay. I’m done.


12 posted on 08/22/2011 7:18:10 PM PDT by MestaMachine (If the truth hurts, prepare yourself for a LOT of pain.)
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To: Kartographer
For beverages and quick energy foods and other goodies, don't overlook having a large supply of sugar onhand. I'd recommend at least 50 lbs in 25 lb bags per person per year.

Also, have plenty of unsweetened Koolaid (I like grape) stored away. You can find packages that make 2 quarts on sale sometimes for 10 cents each. Add 1 cup of sugar and you have a tasty drink that everyone (especially children) will enjoy.

Sugar opens other possibilities such as making alcohol for consumption, trade and can even be used for fuel. It has an almost unlimited storage life if kept dry.

13 posted on 08/22/2011 7:28:16 PM PDT by Errant
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To: MestaMachine

The nice thing about canned items is you usually don’t have to add a lot of water.

My husband and I have been prepping over the past 18 months or so. Our stock includes dry staples like flour, sugar, salt, coffee, spices, powdered milk, grains, cereals, peanut butter, vitamins, oils, etc. And, yes, peanut butter. I date everything with a sharpie as it comes in, and store what I consider to be “fragile packed” in pestproof bins.

My heirloom, organic tomatoes are starting to ripen, so I stocked up on canning supplies last week. I picked up a few hints from my grandmother before she passed, but this will be my first at canning ‘maters. Apple butter is on the list, too.

My 10+ year old van is hinting it would like to retire, and it’s replacement will run on flex fuel and eventually straight alcohol. We live in a farming community and my husband’s goal is getting us off the grid. It’s ambitoious, but a good one.


14 posted on 08/22/2011 7:32:12 PM PDT by Kieri (The Conservatrarian)
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To: MestaMachine

The nice thing about canned items is you usually don’t have to add a lot of water.

My husband and I have been prepping over the past 18 months or so. Our stock includes dry staples like flour, sugar, salt, coffee, spices, powdered milk, grains, cereals, peanut butter, vitamins, oils, etc. And, yes, peanut butter. I date everything with a sharpie as it comes in, and store what I consider to be “fragile packed” in pestproof bins.

My heirloom, organic tomatoes are starting to ripen, so I stocked up on canning supplies last week. I picked up a few hints from my grandmother before she passed, but this will be my first at canning ‘maters. Apple butter is on the list, too.

My 10+ year old van is hinting it would like to retire, and it’s replacement will run on flex fuel and eventually straight alcohol. We live in a farming community and my husband’s goal is getting us off the grid. It’s ambitoious, but a good one.


15 posted on 08/22/2011 7:32:12 PM PDT by Kieri (The Conservatrarian)
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To: Kartographer

We plan to grow alot of ours as well. Here’s our five basic types of storage:

1. Dry storage - Beans, oilseeds, and grains primarily.

2. Processed - canned, dried.

3. Root cellar or ice box. Freezer if there’s electricity.

4. Overwintered - covered by straw or plastic if they can’t naturally survive subzero.

5. Perennials - come up every year. This includes wild foraging.

I read once, that the pioneers never died in the winter in the raging snowstorms like you see on TV. They died in the spring when the grass was green and the flowers blooming, March or April, because they were out of stores and nothing much was growing yet.

Plan for that.


16 posted on 08/22/2011 7:35:21 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Obama/Biden '12: No hope and chump change.)
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To: Kieri

I have been “prepping” for well over a year. Like I said, I could probably list a million things. I have an old, cast iron potbelly woodburning stove just in case. I get a little amused by the people who can’t really afford it who are buying gold as fast a their little eyes can blink. What are you gonna do with it? You can’t eat it, drink it, or plant it. People laugh at me when I tell them to buy seeds and some chickens. Laugh all they want. Laugh until they die.


17 posted on 08/22/2011 7:51:18 PM PDT by MestaMachine (If the truth hurts, prepare yourself for a LOT of pain.)
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To: I see my hands
I see nothing wrong with your plan. But I didn't see anything about water. Any plan is better than no plan.

“He who fails to plan, plans to fail”
18 posted on 08/22/2011 7:55:40 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Free Vulcan

You gotta learn what’s edible. For instance, dandelion leaves are as healthy as spinach. You cook it the same way and season it the way you want. Lots of wild growing things are good for you. Get a book and read up, because honestly, the way things are going, you just don’t know.


19 posted on 08/22/2011 7:58:57 PM PDT by MestaMachine (If the truth hurts, prepare yourself for a LOT of pain.)
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To: Kartographer

And remember that small dogs and cats will work as livestock for those who might be stranded in a suburban house during the spreading of the riots after blackouts.


20 posted on 08/22/2011 8:05:48 PM PDT by familyop ("Plan? There ain't no plan!" --Pigkiller, "Beyond Thunderdome")
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To: MestaMachine

I’ve been learning my plants, especially the early spring ones, and keeping an eye out for things like roots and any kind of wild grain that might have caloric value. Cattail roots as an example.

Also starting to seed things out around the place that tend to establish themselves and thrive without cultivation.


21 posted on 08/22/2011 8:08:04 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Obama/Biden '12: No hope and chump change.)
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To: Errant

I make a gravy for 2 using 1/4C inst. non-fat dry milk. Similac I think it’s spelled. 1TB flour, 1 TB corn starch and about 15 oz liquid of choice. I use veg, chicken, or beef broth. That’s the basic ingredients. Experiment for flavors.

Can be used as a sauce adding cheese.

I need to stock up on these dry products.
I started stocking up on coffee 3 years ago. Sure glad I did.


22 posted on 08/22/2011 8:09:30 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (Rabid democRATS and 0bama the dictator own it all now.)
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To: MestaMachine

Some of us are buying old silver dimes as well. ;)


23 posted on 08/22/2011 8:09:34 PM PDT by Kieri (The Conservatrarian)
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To: Kartographer
Well powered by solar panels, water stored in barrels, and a rain harvesting system. I feel okay even though we're in a desert climate. Well, never okay.. just okayer, lol.

24 posted on 08/22/2011 8:11:10 PM PDT by I see my hands (Keep your sunny side up!)
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To: Kartographer

Hot sauce.....

Some like jalapeno based have vitamin C.

But if hot enought the causticity helps kill paracites in your system.

And it they taste good.


25 posted on 08/22/2011 8:12:42 PM PDT by Keith Brown (Among the other evils being unarmed brings you, it causes you to be despised Machiavelli.)
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To: Kartographer

northern beans and corn bread? Beans with sausage and corn bread, onions and ketchup on top? Good stuff.

Sounds like you’re from the north like me.


26 posted on 08/22/2011 8:13:20 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (Rabid democRATS and 0bama the dictator own it all now.)
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To: Kartographer

Please add me to your ping list.


27 posted on 08/22/2011 8:21:00 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (Rabid democRATS and 0bama the dictator own it all now.)
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To: Kieri

Well, you’re gonna need the silver to kill werewolves and vampires and things. So that is practical. ROFL


28 posted on 08/22/2011 8:29:39 PM PDT by MestaMachine (If the truth hurts, prepare yourself for a LOT of pain.)
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To: Free Vulcan

Game would be plentiful in the spring... squirrels, rabbits, fish, birds.... Pioneers would have trouble in the winter if their previous years crops didn’t come in or if varmints got into their stores.


29 posted on 08/22/2011 8:31:06 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter Hobbit)
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To: familyop

LOL


30 posted on 08/22/2011 8:35:06 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter Hobbit)
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To: Kartographer
I'd like to mention something that may be obvious to those that have been at this longer than I, but several years ago we had our largest chest freezer go out. When I discovered the failure, the contents were still extremely cold, but no longer frozen solid. I had several bushels of peas and beans put up, fruits of all kinds, in addition to all kinds of meat.

Not really knowing any better, I was calling everybody I could think of to come and get things to cook so that they wouldn't go to waste. Had I been better schooled, I would have started canning and dehydrating immediately and saved close to $1000.

I've since discovered than canned meats are actually very good. I've played around with different spices. You can whip up all kinds of soups, casseroles and sandwich fillings with canned meat.

31 posted on 08/22/2011 8:44:25 PM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies. Plan it.)
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To: Kartographer

Please add me to your prep ping list. Thx.


32 posted on 08/22/2011 8:45:06 PM PDT by Jane Long (2 Chron 7:14)
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To: MestaMachine

Yea, the gold bugs amuse me also. If the SHTF as bad as many of them think, gold will be almost useless. You can’t eat it and its heavy to carry.

I am not knocking investments, but the ones who really think gold is something useful when a total collapse comes, as they believe.


33 posted on 08/22/2011 8:45:06 PM PDT by packrat35 (America is rapidly becoming a police state that East Germany could be proud of!)
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To: familyop

I’ve been joking that my 3 labs are a potential food source for 2 years.


34 posted on 08/22/2011 8:46:28 PM PDT by packrat35 (America is rapidly becoming a police state that East Germany could be proud of!)
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To: Kartographer

b4l


35 posted on 08/22/2011 8:48:59 PM PDT by Oratam
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To: Kartographer

Apple cider vinegar. Bragg’s is good. works for everything.


36 posted on 08/22/2011 8:58:00 PM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
You can whip up all kinds of soups, casseroles and sandwich fillings with canned meat.

I've got a secret recipe for a barbecue sandwich that's really easy to make and tastes great that I'm willing to share with just you. ;)

Take a can of chicken breast meat, break it up in a bowl and stir in 1 - 2 tbls of your favorite barbecue sauce. Microwave for about 30 seconds before spooning onto buns or sandwich bread.

It's makes a surprisingly good barbecue sandwich! :)

37 posted on 08/22/2011 9:09:26 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer
I've been preparing for many years. We originally went the bucket and bulk purchase storage route. Over the years we went with a balance of freeze dried with the standard bucket storage. We have balanced it out further with canned goods and a deep freeze. Spices are an important part of the preps. We now refer to our food storage as the temporary, the deep, and very deep. Freeze dried does give that option of very long term storage, however we did not purchase prepared meals.

One of the final areas of food preparation has been acquiring adequate fats and protein. I have been doing low carb now for many years. Many of the prep diets are heavy on carbohydrates. This will not bode well for may people who will develop metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes from this dietary change. Just another consideration. I have many suggestions for those who are concerned about this.

We are currently updating our power backup system with more batteries and an improved transfer switch. One of the items we have always been prepared for is water. We learned over 15 years ago when the power goes out the toilets don't flush. That is the one problem with a water well. Hence, we went a combination of solar and a generator years ago. We have kept our feet in both worlds of having electric service and switching over to batteries when there are outages. That seems to happen regularly where we live.

Having a backup system helped us to prioritise our electric needs versus our wants. Water and refrigeration have always been a priority.

An area of consideration we are completing now is waste disposal. There may not be trash pickup. We have kept a burn barrel for years but have now updated to a link-log incinerator. They are made of a concrete aggregate and you put them together the same way you put the lincoln logs together as children. We have found the link-log outdoor fireplace to be reliable for ten years now. The beauty of the concrete incinerator is that it does not rust out and blends nicely into the landscape.



Finally we are getting the last of the raised beds in. We are installing 12-4X4 drip irrigated units. We are all getting older and square foot gardening makes sense for many reasons, besides being able to keep the animals out when necessary. With our greenhouse we should be able to push three cycles of weather related crops from this garden.



Just a few of my current projects I thought I would share with you. I don't consider prepping to mean sacrificing, though I have been at it now for 12 years. I consider it self-sufficiency to be able to grow and store food, burn wood for heat, provide a minimum of electricity and to continue on as if nothing has happened. The sun will still come up every day and the seasons will change. I have found it important to keep the modern technological diversions in perspective.

PaEngineer
38 posted on 08/22/2011 9:13:57 PM PDT by PA Engineer (SP/XX12: Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: TribalPrincess2U
Same here on the coffee. Had 30 lbs at one time. Been using a lot waiting for coffee prices to come down some.

Community coffee which is my favorite is $8.38 for 23 ounces in a vacuum pack at the local Sam's Club. Used to be less than $4.


39 posted on 08/22/2011 9:18:47 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer
Beans, rice, oatmeal, flour, sugar, cornmeal, grits, dry pastas, vacuum packed dried fruit, dried eggs, cooking oil, salt, pepper, yeast, baking soda, other condiments.

These are our basics we have layed by and stored in abundance. Same for medical supplies, to include six months minimum for prescription drugs.

Firearms and thousands of rounds for same. As we reload, primers, powder, dozens of bullet molds, several 5 gallon buckets of wheel weights and trot line fishing gear.

And the above does not include all we have.

40 posted on 08/22/2011 9:21:07 PM PDT by Sea Parrot (Democrats creation of the entitlement class will prove out to be their very own Frankenstein monster)
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To: Errant

Good coffee


41 posted on 08/22/2011 9:22:09 PM PDT by Dubya-M-DeesWent2SyriaStupid! (It is possible to both promote Palin and support Bachmann at the same time, ya know.)
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To: Dubya-M-DeesWent2SyriaStupid!

Stores well in vacuum packs. Haven’t notice any major taste difference in coffee kept well over a year.


42 posted on 08/22/2011 9:29:14 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer

bttt


43 posted on 08/22/2011 9:30:53 PM PDT by kimmie7 (I do not think BO is the antichrist, but he may very well be 665.)
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To: Sea Parrot

I vacuum pack the rice, beans, cornmeal and etc in 4 lb packages and store these in stackable plastic totes.


44 posted on 08/22/2011 9:32:47 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer; Outlaw Woman

Looks very interesting and right up my alley! Had almost no FR time today - will check it out tomorrow.

Outlaw Woman - it’s been crazy in my house lately. I have not forgotten my plans - my blog is up but still pathetic. Thank you for your reminder and I must get my a** in gear. That means my act of course.


45 posted on 08/22/2011 9:39:09 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: TribalPrincess2U
On the gravy, that sounds like "Yankee" gravy. :)

Here in the south, it's either brown (my favorite), white or redeye gravy.

Just thinking about sausage gravy and biscuits is making my mouth water and I'm not sure I'll be able to wait till morning.

46 posted on 08/22/2011 9:52:52 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Kartographer

This is a little off-topic, but can anyone give me tips on how to keep a well going if the &h*! hits the fan? We have a good deep well but the pump is electric. I’m clueless how to keep it going if we don’t have electricity. Is a generator involved somewhere in this equation? Thanks for info, or pointers to a good web page that gives verrrrry specific how-to information!


47 posted on 08/22/2011 10:02:55 PM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert ("And I'm actually happy to be, for us to be the moat with alligators party." -- Mark Steyn)
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert

Solar back up? A generator (even if you just run it for a few house just to draw enough water for a few days. Depending how deep you can look into getting any old fashion hand pump. But I think a solar back-up or a small generator might be the easiest way to go.


48 posted on 08/22/2011 10:06:20 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: TribalPrincess2U
Here is a recipe for Southern White Gravy. I'd recommend that anyone not accustom to southern gravy delicacies, slowly work their way up to the brown or red-eye gravies. :)
49 posted on 08/22/2011 10:09:08 PM PDT by Errant
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert; Kartographer
I agree with Kart and add that there are hand pumps that also allow you to use your electric pump but they're about $800.

Depending upon voltage, you might also look into getting an inverter that will use your vehicle's battery or solar charged batteries to power the well if a generator is not cost/maintenance effective.

Check out these videos on Youtube for other ideas.

Pumps - standard EMAS handpump using pipes

Well drilling - sludging with temporary casing

50 posted on 08/22/2011 10:22:08 PM PDT by Errant
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