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To: NonZeroSum
No, the child is the same citizenship as the mother, or a citizen of whatever country the airliner is from, depending on that nation's laws. If it were an American aircraft, it might be considered an American citizen, even if it occurred in another country's air space. Landing would change nothing.

What is the threshold for acquiring jus soli? If it's not being born inside the boundary, and it's not touching the soil, by what method does it operate? Again, I am reminded of the Liberal argument for "Instant Personhood" once a child emerges from the womb, but "non personhood" just prior to that time.

Of course the pro-life and jus sanguinius concepts are in complete agreement with each other. (From the moment of conception.) This sudden and wrenching change from one status to another seems to be a sort of ad hoc.

34 posted on 08/31/2011 12:10:14 PM PDT by DiogenesLamp (1790 Congress: No children of a foreign father may be a citizen.)
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To: DiogenesLamp
What is the threshold for acquiring jus soli? If it's not being born inside the boundary, and it's not touching the soil, by what method does it operate?

I already explained, the interior of an aircraft in flight is sovereign territory of the nation in which it is registered. If it is an Air France flight, it would be as if the child were born in France. It has nothing to do with the air space in which it is flying.

I have no idea what kind of point you are attempting to make with this "thought experiment."

35 posted on 08/31/2011 12:18:19 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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