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To: Lady Jag; Ev Reeman; familyof5; NewMediaJournal; pallis; Kartographer; SuperLuminal; unixfox; ...
Benjamin Franklin was uncommonly active in today’s debate, the signing day of our beloved Constitution. His speech was a classic of conciliation, of asking disparate men to look into themselves, and by implication, not their narrow State interests.

We can hardly, truly appreciate 224 years later the enormity of what these men accomplished. Think of the regional animosities that occur in mostly in good humor at FreeRepublic, when for instance, the War between the States comes up. Multiply that by a hundred to perhaps get our minds around the State and regional distrust these men had upon meeting in May 1787.

A few notables of the era decided to not attend when appointed by their States. Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, both of Virginia declined. They were prominent, respected, revolutionary patriots. We will never know how our governing document would have emerged differently had these men been present. Other notable delegates contributed for a period and left early. At the top were Judge Robert Yates and John Lansing of New York, who left during the second week of July, presumably to consult with Governor Clinton and plan opposition to whatever the remaining delegates passed. Luther Martin, Attorney General of his State, the sour and pigheaded, managed to prick egos as well as consciences before he left to organize similar resistance in Maryland.

So, Elbridge Gerry, George Mason, and Edmund Randolph were not the only ones to express dismay with the Constitution. They were without a doubt, the most gentlemanly in their opposition. Despite misgivings, they attended and influenced the Convention to the end.

They were true Americans as much as James Madison, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton and the other signers and defenders of the Constitution.

Ultimately, our liberty is ours to regain or lose. No piece of parchment alone can retrieve that which our ancestors fought and died to give us.

2 posted on 09/17/2011 4:43:13 AM PDT by Jacquerie (Our Constitution is timeless because human nature is static.)
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To: Jacquerie

Excellent and thank you for this thought provoking series.


7 posted on 09/17/2011 7:03:26 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: Jacquerie; Pharmboy

Great post, and thanks for the ping Pharmboy!


10 posted on 09/17/2011 7:54:13 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: Jacquerie

Our liberty is our to regain —or lose-— Of the two options I much prefer to contribute to the former -as I have seen enough loss already.
This I have written my Senators, and Rep Tipton to remind them of the day and how with help from Democrats and even bipartisan help Barry Soetoro aka Barak Hussein Obama II has achieved his purpose of fundamental change in America— Now it is our time to stand and deliver a Patriots response— I will live a free man under our written Constitution —or die in striving to reclaim what has been taken by the Beguiler- I accept any help to that end The Code taken as my own in 1969 Remains so long as I have breath it will be honored.


12 posted on 09/17/2011 8:58:30 AM PDT by StonyBurk (ring)
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To: Jacquerie

Great read! Really brings it to life. Is that from one of Rossiter’s books?


21 posted on 09/17/2011 7:00:22 PM PDT by Lady Jag (Notice how the Democrat party is all Democratic now)
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