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Want to See the Human-Sized Hobbit House That Costs Less Than $5,000 to Build?
TheBlaze ^ | 11242011 | Liz Klimas

Posted on 11/25/2011 9:24:01 AM PST by TheDailyChange

This is not some set left over from The Lord of the Rings. This hobbit house is an honest-to-goodness man-sized home. Not only does it fit a family of four, but it cost just over $4,650 to build.

(Excerpt) Read more at theblaze.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Education; Government; Hobbies; Local News
KEYWORDS: construction; eco; house
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Obama's eco green economy is well underway. Prepare for a new living reality.
1 posted on 11/25/2011 9:24:09 AM PST by TheDailyChange
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To: TheDailyChange

Looks kind of cozy.

2 posted on 11/25/2011 9:27:21 AM PST by 6SJ7 (Meh.)
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To: 6SJ7

There’s no exhaust for the furnace.


3 posted on 11/25/2011 9:29:07 AM PST by Zuben Elgenubi
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To: All

Looks Cool.

I would build something like that but we have NAZI code enforcement here.


4 posted on 11/25/2011 9:29:22 AM PST by troy McClure
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To: 6SJ7

Rammed ground houses are very cheap to build.

The dirt is free.


5 posted on 11/25/2011 9:29:48 AM PST by Jonty30 (If a person won't learn under the best of times, than he must learn under the worst of times.)
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To: TheDailyChange

Are those lamps made out of beer bottles?


6 posted on 11/25/2011 9:29:48 AM PST by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: Zuben Elgenubi

There’s no exhaust for the furnace.


That’s fake and just for show. The candle is the only heat allowed.


7 posted on 11/25/2011 9:31:14 AM PST by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: TheDailyChange

Where I live, the permitting fees alone would be twice that amount.


8 posted on 11/25/2011 9:32:21 AM PST by RetroSexual
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To: Zuben Elgenubi

There’s no exhaust for the furnace.
____________________________________________________

Could be one of those ‘alcohol gel flame’ thingies?


9 posted on 11/25/2011 9:32:32 AM PST by RushIsMyTeddyBear (A MUST WATCH: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=KeOLurcQaqI)
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To: Constitution Day

ping


10 posted on 11/25/2011 9:32:38 AM PST by Tijeras_Slim
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To: TheDailyChange

Cool house but what a flippin’ leftist. His quotes are mindless cliques.


11 posted on 11/25/2011 9:33:29 AM PST by Track9
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To: TheDailyChange
The "back to the earth hippie lifestyle" is fine for some. But, as genuinely concerned about the environment as they may be, their elitist tendency to look down on others inevitably comes shining through. As Simon Dale [himself] says: "Being your own (have a go) architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a mass produced box designed for maximum profit and convenience of the construction industry."

There is something wrong with the psyche of the left in that they can never be proud of their own ideals without tearing down what others do.

It should also be noted that while keeping with the hobbit theme Mr. Dale's new projects are much bigger and employ building techniques that produce a larger carbon foot print than a patty cake mud hut.

12 posted on 11/25/2011 9:33:47 AM PST by Baynative (The penalty for not participating in politics is you will be governed by your inferiors.)
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To: Zuben Elgenubi

It’s an electric heater!


13 posted on 11/25/2011 9:43:02 AM PST by vladimir998 (Anti-Catholics don't know how to think)
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To: troy McClure

Zoning administrations are local tyranny.


14 posted on 11/25/2011 9:49:32 AM PST by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: TheDailyChange
You can get housing really cheaply in this country. It is the ground to put the housing on and the zoning permissions that are incredibly expensive.
15 posted on 11/25/2011 9:50:52 AM PST by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: vladimir998
Back in the days when the Midwest was nothing but a sea of grass and Buffalo, settlers would build sod houses by cutting them out of the soil. There were several reasons: (1) it was cheap; (2) the soil with the grasses holding things together, made for sturdy building materials; (3) the sod huts offered a lot of protection against the harsh Midwest winters; (4) there weren't many trees from which to build houses.

That being said, sod huts had their own attractive qualities. The critters that lived in the ground, now lived in and as part of your new house. The sod houses were very dark inside (probably a good thing since you couldn't see all the creepy, crawly critters), so candles and oil lamps and fireplaces were in use. Sanitation was about what you'd expect from an OWS encampment. If you used the prairie grass as thatch for a roof, you had to contend with the critters that lived in the grass dropping on you at various times. And, as winter set-in, the critters were naturally drawn to the sources of warmth inside the sod house.

There are many ways to build houses on the cheap. As I recall, there are whole communities in New Mexico that devote themselves to such “green” homes. That's well and good, but these folks aren't braving -25 degree temperatures and deep snow either. Be it ever so humble, I like my indoor plumbing, running water, central heating, and other creature comforts. You born-again Hippies can keep yours. Thank you, very much.

16 posted on 11/25/2011 10:08:07 AM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: marktwain

And the TAXES. And the regulations about where things must go, how deep - how high. No longer are we able to use spring water as a source, but are required to have deep wells or hook up to city water sources, ect.

Not one but TWO septic systems must be installed for new builds that are not on city sewer systems. Which in turn requires a larger piece of land so that the systems can meet code in how far apart they are from each other, the house, and from the neighbors. They cost about seven grand each (easy). Then you have to pay the code person to come out and inspect/test them too.

And the TAXES!

I am seeing people begin to live in large NICE campers out in the country. They get to avoid all of that crap, and there are just the vacant land taxes to pay.


17 posted on 11/25/2011 10:36:31 AM PST by Ladysforest
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To: marktwain

You ever hear of buying a piece or land WITHOUT HOA and CC&R’s?


18 posted on 11/25/2011 10:44:12 AM PST by TheDailyChange (Politics,Conservatism,Liberalism)
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To: MasterGunner01

(4) there weren’t many trees from which to build houses.


Is there something with the soil that trees just won’t grow? Always wondered why no trees.


19 posted on 11/25/2011 10:50:52 AM PST by txhurl
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To: txhurl

It was referred to early on as “The Great American Desert” for a very good reason. Not enough rainfall for forests to grow. Most crops now grown there are supported by irrigation.


20 posted on 11/25/2011 11:00:15 AM PST by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: Baynative
There is something wrong with the psyche of the left in that they can never be proud of their own ideals without tearing down what others do.<

Just so. Another illustration of my conclusion, which I have posted here at various times, that the driving dynamic of the left, whether Stalinist or flower child, is hostility toward one's fellow man.

The Left sings hymns to "the masses" while perpetrating gulags for the individuals and genocide for "the other" they so pompously revere in abstracto.

21 posted on 11/25/2011 11:00:37 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: MasterGunner01
When I lived in Arizona I toyed with the idea of a natural house, based on the old Spanish models pre-air conditioning--sunken rooms, thick walls, small east and north facing windows, high ceilings. I never got to build one, but still wish I had given it a try.
22 posted on 11/25/2011 11:05:06 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: TheDailyChange; All
You ever hear of buying a piece or land WITHOUT HOA and CC&R’s?

Yes, I own a number of them. They still exist. There are even counties that have no zoning at all.

23 posted on 11/25/2011 11:06:45 AM PST by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: hinckley buzzard

...the driving dynamic of the left, whether Stalinist or flower child, is hostility toward one’s fellow man.

^^^
I have often noticed their disdain for their “inferiors”, such as waiters and store clerks.


24 posted on 11/25/2011 11:12:57 AM PST by Bigg Red (Maryland girl on the Cain Train)
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To: txhurl
I really don't know why there weren't a lot of trees on the prairie, but there weren't — at least not in the numbers out east. It could be rainfall and the soil conditions just don't promote forests that are a prime source of building materials. There were trees on the prairie and some scraggly forests. However, they were not extensive so that all-wood frame houses could be built in large numbers. As the railroads moved west, they brought building materials from the east to to the prairies. As soon as more and better materials were available, the sod huts and houses went away.
25 posted on 11/25/2011 11:55:56 AM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01
Be it ever so humble, I like my indoor plumbing, running water, central heating, and other creature comforts. You born-again Hippies can keep yours. Thank you, very much.

Lol, I agree. I'm in the process of building a basement home. I'm all about efficiency but I think I'll have to take a pass on the compost toilet and other hippie crap.

26 posted on 11/25/2011 12:04:16 PM PST by Pipe Dog
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To: Pipe Dog
One of the ideas that I toyed with was the conversion of Intermodal shipping containers. These are available in both aluminum and steel. They are now available as surplus around our port areas because the owners rate them as having so many across-the-ocean trips before they are retired.

Standard sizes are 20’ by 8’ by 8’; 40’ by 8’ by 8’; 40’ by 9.5’ by 10.5’; and 45’ by 9.5’ by 10.5’. The latter two are called “high cube” containers. These shipping containers are designed for ship, rail, or road transport. All it would take would be to run in the water, sewerage, and electrical to a site. Do the necessary foundation prep and then bring the container to the site and plop it down. Conversion and finishing could then be done on-site. Or, the container could be prepared and converted off-site, trucked, to the site, off-loaded, and hooked up. Sort of like a Wausau Home.

27 posted on 11/25/2011 12:26:38 PM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01

I’ve just always puzzled over if Centex can grow nearly 100% forest of cedar, oak and elm over NO dirt - just limestone - and hardly any water why the Plains can’t figure out a way.


28 posted on 11/25/2011 12:30:31 PM PST by txhurl
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To: txhurl
I’ve just always puzzled over if Centex can grow nearly 100% forest of cedar, oak and elm over NO dirt - just limestone - and hardly any water why the Plains can’t figure out a way.

I believe a lot of it was the Indians modifying the environment to suit their purposes. They routinely used fire to keep the prairies open and to hunt with. If the seedlings get burned up, areas where trees grow slower never get trees. I notice that most of the plains have trees along the creeks and rivers.

29 posted on 11/25/2011 12:50:05 PM PST by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: marktwain

I really like this house.

30 posted on 11/25/2011 1:01:18 PM PST by txhurl
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To: Tijeras_Slim; Constitution Day

HA!


31 posted on 11/25/2011 1:10:35 PM PST by Rebelbase (Yes we Cain!)
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To: TheDailyChange

I’d bet the cost was way over $5000. Based on the last time I priced windows, I’d guess his glass windows cost that much.


32 posted on 11/25/2011 1:13:05 PM PST by Mr Rogers ("they found themselves made strangers in their own country")
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To: txhurl

me too. Deep in my heart I am an elf.


33 posted on 11/25/2011 1:15:24 PM PST by Chickensoup (In the 20th century 200 million people were killed by their own governments.)
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To: Mr Rogers

I like the house too, but I would be concerned about how he waterproofed the roof and support structures. I would bet the $5,000 is only for materials and that most of those are salvaged.

If he did the proper waterproofing, that house could last a long time. There are hay bale houses in the Dakotas that are over a hundred years old.


34 posted on 11/25/2011 1:16:30 PM PST by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: MasterGunner01
Interesting, but being 8' to 10.5' wide would be uncomfortable imo. Different strokes for different folks though. Also wonder about the corrosive effect of exposure to salty air and water on the steel containers.
35 posted on 11/25/2011 1:17:03 PM PST by Pipe Dog
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To: MasterGunner01; txhurl

I believe it was because of the prevalence of prairie fires. Killed the trees, but the grasses loved it.

My home state, Nebraska, was originally pretty much devoid of trees, except along the river bottoms. But they have planted millions of them over the last century and a half. They do fine without the naturally-occurring prairie fires to take them out.


36 posted on 11/25/2011 1:25:58 PM PST by EternalVigilance (Newt Gingrich: The go to guy when you're down to the bottom of the bottom of the barrel...)
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To: hinckley buzzard; Jay Santos CP

The black voting block is an illustration of marketing and PR at it’s best. Who could have imagined, 60 years ago, that the descendants of slaves would one day support the party of segregation to the extent that they now do?


37 posted on 11/25/2011 1:45:24 PM PST by Baynative (The penalty for not participating in politics is you will be governed by your inferiors.)
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To: Baynative; hinckley buzzard; Jay Santos CP

Don’t ask me how that post got on this topic!


38 posted on 11/25/2011 1:47:03 PM PST by Baynative (The penalty for not participating in politics is you will be governed by your inferiors.)
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To: EternalVigilance

They do fine without the naturally-occurring prairie fires to take them out.


That’s what I was thinking. If we can grow trees hydroponically, certainly the Midwest can do it conventionally.


39 posted on 11/25/2011 2:16:54 PM PST by txhurl
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To: Baynative

That is strange!


40 posted on 11/25/2011 2:40:54 PM PST by Jay Santos CP ("Idiocracy"... It's no longer just a movie.)
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To: Peanut Gallery; Corin Stormhands; HairOfTheDog

ping


41 posted on 11/25/2011 4:02:11 PM PST by Professional Engineer (Never Again! Except for the next time.)
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To: Chickensoup

LOL, same here.


42 posted on 11/25/2011 5:36:41 PM PST by Ladysforest
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To: Pipe Dog
What you do with the Intermodals is join them together (or stack them) to give you the space you need — much the same way double-wide house trailers do. If you join five 40x8-foot containers to a single 40x8-foot container (each one is 320 square feet) together, you get a rather nice 1,920 square foot (40x48-foot) living space. Another idea is arrange four 40x8-foot containers in a square with an open center. The containers can be the living areas off the center courtyard that can be totally enclosed and arranged internally to suit the owner's taste.

Now, I'll grant the containers are homely as all get out, but they are designed to go together and stack on each other or side-by-side or end-to-end. I think that there's a real and untapped market to recycle these containers into sturdy and available housing.

43 posted on 11/26/2011 10:14:59 AM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: Track9
We built an earth-sheltered home and shop building w/ geothermal in-floor heating. (ICF w/ 8" conc. walls). So many people show up thinking we are liberals. It's always a fun interaction when it dawns on them.

Photobucket

Feb 2008

44 posted on 11/26/2011 10:26:37 AM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: MasterGunner01
You are quite right about corrosion damage. One of the reasons the Intermodals get retired is they live in a very corrosive environment at sea. That's why the shippers consider they have a life of so many years or voyages and then they are retired. However, the basic structure of the container remains sound and that's what you're buying.

If one container is badly damaged from corrosion or outside physical damage, then you just select a better one. Heavily damaged or otherwise unserviceable containers are recycled in any event. What's left are very sturdy aluminum or steel containers you can put together and customize at an affordable price.

I looked into this customization and there are several web-based companies that deal with all aspects of Intermodal container conversion into housing. It's not for everyone, but there are opportunities to be had here.

45 posted on 11/26/2011 10:31:41 AM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01
You may be on to something. People are erecting steel buildings and making homes out of them now. We're seeing more of that in our area lately. Garage and house together in one structure. Which was something the wife and I considered.

But I'm glad we made the command decision to build the basement house. We're dug in to the hill tighter than a tick on a dog. Virtually no exterior maintenance with two thirds being underground, easy to heat and cool and all one level. We're not getting any younger.

46 posted on 11/26/2011 11:40:18 AM PST by Pipe Dog
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To: marktwain

Actually, the oldest hay bale structure in the mid west is a
two story hotel.


47 posted on 11/26/2011 11:51:24 AM PST by OregonRancher (Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints)
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To: gorush
I've seen your place before on other threads....very nice!
We're just getting started on our basement house.



48 posted on 11/26/2011 11:52:47 AM PST by Pipe Dog
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To: Pipe Dog

Looks like a very nice spot. Good luck with construction...it can be fun if one is not tt impatient.


49 posted on 11/26/2011 11:55:09 AM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: MasterGunner01
Btw, did you see this?

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2812576/posts

50 posted on 11/26/2011 12:05:25 PM PST by Pipe Dog
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