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iBooks Author is cool, but will not save education
John's Wise Thoughts ^ | 21 Jan. 2012 | John Walker

Posted on 01/21/2012 6:48:31 PM PST by walkwu

If you paid any attention to the rumblings in the technology industry this week, you would know that Apple released a piece of software that will supposedly revolutionize the educational industry. iBooks Author is the culmination of many years of internal developments at Apple. Modernizing education was, of course, the passion of Apple's late legendary leader, Steve Jobs, and was the project he most wanted to see come to light.

Let me be clear, what Apple released Thursday, Jan. 19., is revolutionary. It will change many aspects of education within the United States and potentially worldwide. However, it will not solve the educational problem.

So, what is the educational problem? As Apple stated in its presentation Thursday, the United States ranks 17, 23, and 31 in reading, science and math, respectively in the world. This is a problem. What wasn't pointed out, however, is that there was one country that was at the top of all three categories. Any idea which country in the world is ranked number one in reading, science and math (at least according to Apple's statistics)? Here's a hint, four out of the top five countries in each of the three categories came from Asia.

The answer as to the number one position?

China.

Yes, China.

This leads to an obvious question: why is China number one? Is it because the Chinese are inherently smarter than anyone else? Is it because they have educational materials that are not available anywhere else? Or is it because they have better teachers than anyone else?

(Excerpt) Read more at johnswisethoughts.blogspot.com ...


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Computers/Internet; Education; Science
KEYWORDS: apple; computer; education; technology

1 posted on 01/21/2012 6:48:39 PM PST by walkwu
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To: walkwu
The only things that matter are hard work, persistence and passion.

So, America is mostly screwed.

2 posted on 01/21/2012 6:56:57 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war.)
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To: walkwu

Garbage in, garbage out. This just makes the garbage flow faster.


3 posted on 01/21/2012 6:59:05 PM PST by Salvavida (The restoration of the U.S.A. starts with filling the pews at every Bible-believing church.)
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To: walkwu
why is China number one?

Because if you don't do well, they will kill you, jail you, or beat you. And they lie.

Give me that kind of latitude, 60 1st graders, and all of them would be reading at an 8th grade level in 6 months. The ones that lived, anyway.

/johnny

4 posted on 01/21/2012 7:06:38 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: walkwu
Chinese parents expect their children to be respectful and obedient to their teachers.

This is the missing element in the American educational system today. Respectful children learn. Mouthy and disrespectful children with bad attitudes who are disruptive, indifferent and laxidasical about their lessons learn very little, if anything at all.

5 posted on 01/21/2012 7:07:08 PM PST by FrdmLvr (culture, language, borders)
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To: walkwu

The technology

Will not ‘save’ education. But,

Will revolutionalize the control of the only acceptible ‘correct thoughts’ more easily.

And that is the goal of education / educators nowadays.


6 posted on 01/21/2012 7:14:07 PM PST by Sir Napsalot (Pravda + Useful Idiots = CCCP; JournOList + Useful Idiots = DopeyChangey!)
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To: FrdmLvr

What you have described is the excessive pride of the self-esteem movement that leads to making students that are puffed up and not teachable.


7 posted on 01/21/2012 7:23:51 PM PST by chickenlips (Pride IS the problem. (1 Peter 5:5))
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...

Thanks walkwu.
It will change many aspects of education within the United States and potentially worldwide. However, it will not solve the educational problem. So, what is the educational problem? As Apple stated in its presentation Thursday, the United States ranks 17, 23, and 31 in reading, science and math, respectively in the world. This is a problem. What wasn't pointed out, however, is that there was one country that was at the top of all three categories. Any idea which country in the world is ranked number one in reading, science and math (at least according to Apple's statistics)? Here's a hint, four out of the top five countries in each of the three categories came from Asia.
See, all we need to do is make a law restricting family size to one child. /s


8 posted on 01/21/2012 7:34:25 PM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
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To: walkwu

Big gov types never understand that children spend 13 percent of their time in school, 1 percent at church if they go to church and the rest of the time at home. Which will influence children the most? Home!!!! So no matter how much you spend for the schools per student, it will be meaningless if the child’s home life is a failure. Look at inner city minority schools as an example. You can triple current spending per student it will still fail and lag in performance.


9 posted on 01/21/2012 7:47:55 PM PST by Fee
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To: JRandomFreeper
You got that right! And don't most other countries only test the “college bound elite” while we include test scores from 21 year old 9th graders that have missed 80 days of school?
10 posted on 01/21/2012 8:00:03 PM PST by MacMattico
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To: FrdmLvr
Students should be respectful, but not to the extent that they are forced to swallow the union party line hook, line and sinker.

With a billion people and forced, threatened education you're going to get some kids testing well. I kind of like those rebels that question some of the brainwashing going on today, getting creative and thinking for themselves. If not all of our science students would be worshiping Algore, and there are enough of them out there that know to reject liberal education assumptions that keep us in the forefront.

11 posted on 01/21/2012 8:12:14 PM PST by MacMattico
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To: FrdmLvr
This is the missing element in the American educational system today. Respectful children learn. Mouthy and disrespectful children with bad attitudes who are disruptive, indifferent and laxidasical about their lessons learn very little, if anything at all.

I think it's a society problem in general.

It was reinforced to me again tonight when I stopped by to pick up some groceries. I witnessed some little kid, probably 8 or 9 years old, throwing one helluva temper tantrum because he wasn't getting a certain type of cereal. He started pulling cereal boxes off the shelves and even tore one open and spilled it.

His parents, yes, multiple, parents, tried to pretend like it wasn't happening and were in fact trying to reason with the kid, as if he is an adult or capable of being reasoned with. The dad finally told the kid that he would buy him the cereal if the kid calmed down. The kid still knocked a couple of more boxes off the shelf.

The kid grabbed a couple of boxes and left in a huff, with the parents following. They didn't pick up any of the boxes their kid had pulled off the shelves, they left a mess of at least a dozen or so boxes scattered on the floor not to mention the the spilled cereal.

People want to know what's wrong with America, that was a prime example to me.

People coddling their kids and then not even picking up after them.

When I was a kid, if that had been me, the moment that I screamed and started to pull just one box of cereal off the shelf, my dad would have had me halfway out the door and there would have been definite consequences. I could kiss goodbye the chances of my parents buying that cereal for me anytime in the next year, but that would have been the least of my worries. My parents would have also found the store manager and paid for the spilled cereal and helped clean up.

A few weeks ago, I saw a kid throw food at his mom in a restaurant, and she pretended like it didn't happen. So of course he did it again.

This kind of crap is going to doom us as a nation. I see too many parents who treat their kids as if they are little adults and try to reason with them or they pretend like everything is okay or its just a phase.
12 posted on 01/21/2012 8:20:48 PM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: Fee
Big gov types never understand that children spend 13 percent of their time in school, 1 percent at church if they go to church and the rest of the time at home. Which will influence children the most? Home!!!! So no matter how much you spend for the schools per student, it will be meaningless if the child’s home life is a failure.

AMEN! How many of us know people who think that TV or videogames are acceptable babysitters for their kids?

I thank God my kids turned out okay and are raising their kids well. I have too many friends whose grandkids are growing up on a diet of videogames and TV.

We have created an entitlement culture that shirks the responsibility of raising its young.
13 posted on 01/21/2012 8:24:20 PM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: MacMattico
You got that right! And don't most other countries only test the “college bound elite” while we include test scores from 21 year old 9th graders that have missed 80 days of school?

It's crazy. We used to never have all of these standardized testing when I was a kid. I was in public schools, Hell, we moved around and I went through a lot of military schools or schools in places with a lot of other kids who were being moved around because their parents were in the military.

Liberals would tell you that because our parents moved around so much or with one parent gone for long stretches of time, or being stationed in foreign countries, that we would have a hard time succeeding. The problem for the liberals is that our parents were were good people who wanted us to have a better life than they did, but they didn't coddle us. I occasionally get together with folks from when I was a kid, and by all rights many should have been failures for having moved around a lot or been stuck in government schools, but the large majority of us had no problems and were quite successful in our careers.

I bet that if they had been pushing all of those standardized tests on all of us military brats, a lot of us would have had problems, given that some folks changed schools within a single year.

This standardized testing nonsense is the result of the entitlement culture I mentioned - they think everybody should be treated as if they are going to college.

Newsflash: Not everybody was meant to go to college. Some people are going to drop out, some folks are going to be working in blue collar jobs, welders, farmers, restaurants, etc.

We need to stop the No Child Left Behind crap before it destroys the nation's schools, and we need to stop this liberal nonsense that everybody could potentially go to college. Liberals do not understand that many people will end up in jobs that liberals frown upon, and will be perfectly happy with those jobs.
14 posted on 01/21/2012 8:33:44 PM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: af_vet_rr

My dad had a way of pecking you on top of the head with his finger. It was a real attention getter. He didn’t let you get away with nonsense in public.


15 posted on 01/21/2012 8:35:36 PM PST by Lurkina.n.Learnin (The democratic party is the greatest cargo cult in history.)
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To: walkwu

The more techno-toys added to the schools does absolutely nothing to help increase education levels in this country.

Get rid of the computers, tablets, smart-phone apps, etc, except in labs to teach computer skills such as word processing, spread sheets, drafting, etc.

Our kids are learning nothing with these toys except how to post to face book, buy or steal on-line music, and play on-line games. I am tired of subsidizing this horrendous waste of money.


16 posted on 01/21/2012 8:46:38 PM PST by wrench
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To: af_vet_rr

My husband was well into his MA degree because he was “supposed” to get a Graduate degree when he realized “I can’t do this for the rest of my life!”

Fortunately he also was able to get a well paying skilled job where he could work with people and outside of an office.


17 posted on 01/21/2012 9:13:32 PM PST by MacMattico
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To: wrench
My daughters both can't write in cursive to save their lives. I've at least got them working on a decent signature.

And many kids think if they can get onto Facebook that makes them Computer Science experts.

My older daughter got rave reviews on her French class PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint is a simple program that makes the work look good, not like in the “old days” when you had to make a project/presentation from scratch. She's in 8th grade, she needs to do the work, not Apple.

18 posted on 01/21/2012 9:23:45 PM PST by MacMattico
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To: walkwu

Apple is doing this doing this because helping education become better has long been a goal.

However, as Steve Jobs said in an interview around 1996 (before he returned to Apple), “What is wrong with education no tech will fix. What is wrong with education is political”.

Jobs wanted the US to be the leader in math and sciences.


19 posted on 01/22/2012 4:52:34 AM PST by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
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To: walkwu

This article about the Apple education technology announcement:
http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2012/01/apple-education-jobs/

includes this quote from a 1996 interview with Steve Jobs on education and technology:

“I used to think that technology could help education. I’ve probably spearheaded giving away more computer equipment to schools than anybody else on the planet. But I’ve had to come to the inevitable conclusion that the problem is not one that technology can hope to solve. What’s wrong with education cannot be fixed with technology. No amount of technology will make a dent.

It’s a political problem. The problems are sociopolitical. The problems are unions. You plot the growth of the NEA [National Education Association] and the dropping of SAT scores, and they’re inversely proportional. The problems are unions in the schools. The problem is bureaucracy.”

Computer software, or lack thereof, isn’t the problem. Even Steve Jobs knew that. Too bad our political class does not.


20 posted on 01/22/2012 5:25:03 AM PST by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: MacMattico; af_vet_rr
I'm not talking about kids questioning content. In fact, I tend to question THEIR "prior knowledge" regarding issues such as global warming, etc. In fact, I encourage a good discussion. I find ways around teaching that PC stuff anyway. What I'm talking about are kids who bring the petty - yes I said it - PETTY differences they have with each other into the classroom, they think everything should stop if they happen to have some issue that needs to be addressed immediately, they argue with each other while the teacher is teaching, they interrupt the teacher, name-call, start fights, ask to see the social worker during class because something happened on the bus or at lunch. (last week, this was one issue: a girl wanted to talk to the principal because a girl came up to her table at lunch and told her her hair was ugly). These two have their differences, and were separated earlier in the school year (one was placed in another classroom) because they became so disruptive with their preoccupation with each other in the classroom. Because of their past history with each other, the mother had to be called - not an infrequent thing that happens btw. Oh, and I was called a BITCH by a mother (just so happens to be the mother of the other girl who I had transferred out of my room who called my student's hair ugly at lunch) and had the phone slammed down on me because I called her to talk about her daughter's unacceptable behavior.

A very high percentage of these kids have absolutely no concept of what it means to be in school. This year, I'm teaching 5th grade, but I have dealt with this in high school, middle school, fourth and now fifth grades. The entire school is this way. This is a school with a very high percentage of Detroit Public Schools "refuges". This has been a "school of choice" for as long as I've taught in the district. I am one Republican, conservative to the core, who is thoroughly against the concept of "school of choice". It has completely destroyed this formerly great, blue collar school district. Here is the biggest kicker: Although I haven't heard this yet from my fifth graders or my fourth graders last year, it was very common to hear this in my middle school and high school classes (and in the hallways) "Why you actin' so white?" If a child would participate in class, or act respectfully in the hallway, someone would always use this tactic on them. That always got a write up from me for racism, but it never did any good because it never stopped them. They never cared if they went to the principal's office with a write up.

21 posted on 01/22/2012 8:57:00 AM PST by FrdmLvr (culture, language, borders)
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To: wrench

About three years ago, my brother went to Japan to observe their public schools. There were absolutely no computers in the classrooms.


22 posted on 01/22/2012 10:07:52 AM PST by goldi
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To: walkwu

I’ve said for many years the following:

1) None of these education measurements mean squat. Most other countries, including Japan (where high school is typically paid for by the family) and China, do not require High School attendance. Those who are not worried about going to college or certain types of work do not attend high school they go into apprenticeships and trade schools. The measurements are not apples to apples, they are apples to oranges (ties in with my next point). Therefore any country to country comparisons that do not account for this issue are useless data with no basis in facts.

2) Even Jobs stated that one of the major issues is unions and their lack of accountability in enforcing teacher standards.

3) Finally unless the homes enforce the standards the kids do not do the work needed to reinforce what is taught and therefore it is not retained. This is the main issue; while it can be addressed to some degree by teacher enforcement of homework and individual coaching, those are the rare exceptions and will not work for all. Parents if you want your kids to do well enforce discipline at home and set high expectations.


23 posted on 01/22/2012 12:50:26 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: goldi

My wife is Japanese - so when she takes the kids to Japan to visit during the summer we put them into school (their school year is 4 qtrs with mid sized breaks instead of 2 long semesters with a big summer break.

I laughed out loud when Newt talked about kids cleaning the school because that is exactly what happens in Japan. Each class has their own classroom plus one general area that they are responsible for. A lot of their social interaction happens during these periods. There is no discussion, teacher says ok clean up and they each have rotating assignments - wipe the floor and walls down with rags, sweep, feed the class animals, water the class garden, chalkboards, bathrooms, you name it. They also have assignments to get, serve, and cleanup for lunch every day.

Best part is - THE GIRLS LOVED IT - because they felt like they were treated as adults and had responsibilities. There was no “do we have to” - not because the teachers would do anything, but because the kids self-police themselves if someone isn’t pulling their load. (I will admit there are some issues with bullying, but no worse than in the States and in most cases they are self-resolved whereas here a lot of times it goes on forever because no one is allowed to hurt Little Timmy’s, the bully, feelings.


24 posted on 01/22/2012 1:01:11 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: reed13k
Finally unless the homes enforce the standards the kids do not do the work needed to reinforce what is taught and therefore it is not retained. This is the main issue; while it can be addressed to some degree by teacher enforcement of homework and individual coaching, those are the rare exceptions and will not work for all. Parents if you want your kids to do well enforce discipline at home and set high expectations.

Amen. I see this all the time - not just situations like the kid throwing a tantrum in the grocery store and the parents caving in to him.

I think it directly ties into how many parents were raised by liberals from the baby boomer generation. I'm a baby boomer, and when we raising our two oldest kids, we were around military families for the most part, but I encountered many people from my generation who raised their children with a sense of entitlement and a lack of discipline. Plenty of people who said they would never spank their kids or try to shape their personalities. I see them letting their kids become couch potatoes, I see little kids running around with iPhones or playstations constantly playing videogames. These kids are getting very little out of that, while the parents are just being lazy and selfish and letting TV or videogames raise their kids.

The chickens are coming home to roost, and the children of the hippies are doing an even worse job of parenting.

It scares the hell out of me to think about the next generation. There is already a huge sense of entitlement - when my daughter was doing her student teaching, she witnessed a parent yelling at a teacher because her kid got an A- instead of an A+. This was elementary school - you'd think the parent was worried their kid wouldn't get into college. That parent's attitude will most surely be passed down to their children.

We did a lot of shopping in December at some malls, and because my hip was bothering me, I spent a lot of time sitting down peoplewatching while my wife shopped. It is depressing how many children are being raised by parents who don't give a damn or who let their kids push them around.

When kids learn that they can push their parents around, they are going to apply it to all adults, especially teachers. Some will get lucky, even if they don't know it, and find teachers who won't put up with their crap, or end up in athletics with coaches who won't put up with that crap, and they'll straighten out, but a lot will skate through school and then find themselves lost when they are forced to fend for themselves.

Then again, there seem to be a lot more kids living at home these days long after they should have gotten a job and moved out.
25 posted on 01/22/2012 1:07:15 PM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: reed13k

It’s a different culture in Japan, but in this country, parents pay school taxes through the nose and they don’t want their kids doing jobs that the janitors should be doing. Gingrich wants to get minority children used to working for a paycheck, not doing “community service” (which is a crock as far as I’m concerned. Community service is for those who break the law, not public school kids), and for this, he gets hammered by self-serving minority politicians who want minority kids to stay on the plantation forever because it enables them to enrich themselves at the public trough.


26 posted on 01/22/2012 3:44:54 PM PST by goldi
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To: FrdmLvr

Sorry if I misunderstood. I can’t imagine trying to teach in that environment, and feel bad for the kids that want to learn, because they’re out there, but in some schools they just want to blend in with the rest so they’re left alone.


27 posted on 01/23/2012 1:08:40 AM PST by MacMattico
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To: walkwu; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; ...
The Naysayers are pooh-poohing iBooks Author and the Apple initiative on textbooks—PING!


Apple iBooks textbooks Ping!

Please, No Flame Wars!
Discuss technical issues, software, and hardware.
Don't attack people!
Don't respond to the Anti-Apple Thread Trolls!
PLEASE IGNORE THEM!!!

If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

28 posted on 01/24/2012 1:23:24 AM PST by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: reed13k

Very Interesting!


29 posted on 01/24/2012 7:44:58 AM PST by Loud Mime (When conceit and anger are part of your religion, it's a political movement, not a religion.)
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To: af_vet_rr
People coddling their kids and then not even picking up after them.

Child Protective Services.

Children have rights, and they know how to exercise them, because the schools they go to spend a lot of money teaching them how to intimidate their parents.

30 posted on 01/24/2012 8:56:11 AM PST by itsahoot (You are no longer a person, you are now a Unit when you need health care.)
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To: walkwu

I doubt anything can save Public Education, but this tool presents more value to budding writers than it does to educators.


31 posted on 01/24/2012 9:00:29 AM PST by itsahoot (You are no longer a person, you are now a Unit when you need health care.)
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To: Swordmaker
The Naysayers are pooh-poohing iBooks Author and the Apple initiative on textbooks—PING!
This is actually the first article I've seen posted on FR about iAuthor. Did I miss something? Seems like I'd have heard about it from you, if not from the homeschool ping lists. But - until now - nothing since the actual Apple presentation about iAuthor.

32 posted on 01/24/2012 6:14:30 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (DRAFT PALIN)
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To: Swordmaker
The Naysayers are pooh-poohing iBooks Author and the Apple initiative on textbooks—PING!
This is actually the first article I've seen posted on FR about iAuthor. Did I miss something? Seems like I'd have heard about it from you, if not from the homeschool ping lists. But - until now - nothing since the actual Apple presentation about iAuthor.

33 posted on 01/24/2012 6:14:40 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (DRAFT PALIN)
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To: Swordmaker
The Naysayers are pooh-poohing iBooks Author and the Apple initiative on textbooks—PING!
This is actually the first article I've seen posted on FR about iAuthor. Did I miss something? Seems like I'd have heard about it from you, if not from the homeschool ping lists. But - until now - nothing since the actual Apple presentation about iAuthor.

34 posted on 01/24/2012 6:15:40 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (DRAFT PALIN)
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To: Swordmaker
I just viewed the video at the Apple site. My summary is that Apple has
  1. added a textbook section to the iBook store.
  2. created an authoring tool to expedite the creation of interactive iPad textbooks. These textbooks will sell for less than $15 apiece (electronic copies of course) and will stay with the student rather than having to be returned after a school year.
  3. the reader for the iBooks enables the student to append notes to the text, and collect those notes to make study materials. The authoring app facilitates the use of very powerful graphics and interaction with the material.
  4. iTunes U. allows educational institutions to create free online courseware.
The authoring app and the iPad reader app are available now, as free downloads.

35 posted on 01/24/2012 8:07:49 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (DRAFT PALIN)
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