Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Should High School Graduation be Mandatory?
TheCollegeConservative ^ | 02/06/2012 | William McMahon

Posted on 02/06/2012 5:01:12 PM PST by gabriellah

President Obama seems to be rather fond of mandates. We are all familiar with his health care insurance mandate and his love of executive orders. Now it seems that he wishes to solve our educational woes with mandatory high school graduation (or at least attendance until the age of 18). It seems strange that the president should choose to address this relatively minor problem so emphatically when faced with the ever more dire threats of debt the size of the nation’s economy, the prospect of a nuclear Iran, and the continuing financial crises.

First, it is important to address the issue of choice. What seems to be a common theme in politics repeats itself; the government allows individuals a choice. When individuals make the wrong choice, the government declares the ability to choose must be eliminated. This attitude is especially disquieting in a nominally “pro-choice” President. It seems that in the eyes of the administration, a seventeen-year-old girl is qualified to decide the fate of her unborn child, but is unable to decide whether or not to attend high school.

The practical reality of this proposal also brings into question its moral integrity. The federal government involves itself only to the extent of requiring states to require students to stay until graduation or their 18th birthday. Despite stripping the states of the right to decide the minimal amount of high school education, the federal government still leaves the states to pay for it. There is some degree of correlation between low graduation rates and high poverty rates in states. Mississippi, the state with the highest rate of poverty, also has a graduation rate of 63.9%. Although 100% graduation is not realistic, even under Obama’s plan, let us assume the goal of 100% graduation is achieved. This would represent a 56.5% increase in student population at Mississippi high schools. Either the state must raise taxes on its already financially beleaguered population or accept larger class sizes and fewer teachers per student. One option would harm a vulnerable economy while the other would create an environment where academic enrichment is even harder to obtain. This makes the incentive to drop out even greater.

This plan has been tried before in various states, like New Mexico, whose graduation rate is, nevertheless, only 65%, as well as Texas, which is scarcely better at 67%, and Hawaii at 69%. More positive examples do exist, like Wisconsin, with an impressive 85% graduation rate. Iowa, meanwhile, lets students drop out at 16 years old and has an astounding 93% graduation rate. Georgia also lets 16-year-old students drop out and has a graduation rate of only 54%. There does not appear to be any correlation whatsoever between minimum age for dropping out and graduation rates.

A survey conducted by John M. Bridgeland, John J. DiIulio, Jr., and Karen Burke Morison cited a number of reasons why students decided to drop out of high school. Though the individual reasons vary greatly, a common theme of disengagement seems present among them. 47% of drop-outs surveyed said that classes were uninteresting, 65% reported frequently missing class and 81% said that their education should have been more applicable to the workplace. Simply mandating graduation for these students is unlikely to produce the desired results. According to this survey, 32% had already repeated grades prior to dropping out. Before taking the drastic step of mandating high school graduation, it would be sensible to look for new ways to engage students and make their education relevant to their careers.

Nevertheless, the high school drop-out problem is far too complex to fit into the neat formula of a single solution. It may be true that mandatory attendance until the age of 18 is the best idea, but it is not likely to be the best idea in every case. As such, this problem is best addressed on a local level by state governments and individual communities who are most aware of the problems facing their schools. After all, isn’t it their choice?


TOPICS: Education; Government; Politics
KEYWORDS: highschool; mandate

1 posted on 02/06/2012 5:01:14 PM PST by gabriellah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

I think we should set the kids free from all mandatory schooling. Parents who want their kids to make something of their lives will see that they get an education.

Seems to me that we have too many kids who want to learn being locked up in buildings with kids who don’t.


2 posted on 02/06/2012 5:05:26 PM PST by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Make it mandatory and it will mean nothing!


3 posted on 02/06/2012 5:06:52 PM PST by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Voting against rats should be mandatory.


4 posted on 02/06/2012 5:11:02 PM PST by Paladin2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

Making it mandatory means dumbing down the standards to ensure that EVERYONE graduates.

We’re going to turn out 18 year olds with the math comprehension of a nematode.

America is cooked, and we’ll be consumed if this festering pile of Kenyan animal excrement is re-elected in November.


5 posted on 02/06/2012 5:12:00 PM PST by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

This is just my two cents and I will probably get flamed but NO... high school graduation should NOT be mandatory. Besides the obvious choice and freedom of the parents and child, there is the little “discipline” issue. High school kids who are the disruptive/drug using/gang banging/poor academic and behavioral issue students may want to drop out. Why not? They aren’t participating academically or behaviorally. Mandate a high school degree (or to stay in school until age 18), you are essentially punishing the “good” kids by keeping the “bad” kids in school. Unfortunately, I have seen this firsthand in the local high school.


6 posted on 02/06/2012 5:12:11 PM PST by momtothree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red_Devil 232

My sister is working on getting my 13 year old niece enrolled in one of the online schooling programs. There’s a 2000 student cap on the number enrolled in this state and 5000 already on the waiting list. She likes the curriculum better and she won’t have to face the crap that goes on in the school anymore.

I know I would have benefited a great deal from something like that but there wasn’t even an internet in the 80s.


7 posted on 02/06/2012 5:14:09 PM PST by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah
Of course Graduation should be optional! You might be offered a job if you have a diploma and we can't be havin’ that! Where would all the food stamp and welfare money go if some people had to work? When you're up getting high all night playing X-box you can not be expected to attend school or get a job the next day! (Actual description of person who was suppose to graduate with my niece.)
8 posted on 02/06/2012 5:14:41 PM PST by MacMattico
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rarestia
“Making it mandatory means dumbing down the standards to ensure that EVERYONE graduates.”

I heard it said once there are 3 things a person can do that would put them into the 89 percentile of having a successful and fulfilling life.

1. Finish High School
2. Don’t have children before you are Married.
3. Don’t marry before the age of 24

If making High School mandatory that will severily impact High School being on that list.

9 posted on 02/06/2012 5:17:23 PM PST by NavyCanDo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
Couldn't have said it better myself, CC! It would VASTLY improve the quality of education. It would be the single-most important factor in turning our educational system into a world class system.

In fact, this is what most other countries do anyway. America is practically the only (if not the only) country that educates all of it's children, and it's why our scores look so bad when compared to other countries.

10 posted on 02/06/2012 5:17:32 PM PST by FrdmLvr (culture, language, borders)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Seems like the progressive solution would be a Minimum Grade.
It sort of works like a Minimum Wage.
Noone gets less than a “D” then in futrure election they vote to raise the Minimun Grade to a “C” Then a “B”
Until finally, everyone is as dumb as a turnip but they are all “A” students.


11 posted on 02/06/2012 5:21:03 PM PST by Leep (It's gonna be a Newt day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

It won’t matter. We just had an ad placed for an open position and the amount of cover letters we got was huge.

Unfortunately, 95% of the cover letters not only had so many spelling mistakes but these “university” graduates could not even write a coherent paragraph...just ONE paragraph of why they are suited for the position. Thank God we didn’t even bother to state ‘attach your resume’ as it will be useless. My business partner almost cried at the next generation of idiots this country produced and will produce.


12 posted on 02/06/2012 5:21:16 PM PST by max americana (Buttcrack Obama is an idiot)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek

My 20 year old son will tell you that pulling him out of public school his SR. year and enrolling in an online school was the best thing for him.

He did one year of college and hated every minute of general education. He’s in his 2nd semester of intensive welding classes and is ga-ga gonzo for learning it and the math, science and analytical skills that go along with the program.


13 posted on 02/06/2012 5:21:33 PM PST by Rebelbase
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: FrdmLvr

We should educate all of the kids who want to be educated and a fair number of adults would eventually decide to educate themselves. I quit school in my junior year and ended up taking my GED test before my classmates graduated.


14 posted on 02/06/2012 5:22:06 PM PST by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
"....but there wasn’t even an internet in the 80s."

Yeah, my parents wouldn't buy me a computer OR let me on the internet when I wuz a kid. It was child abuse I tell ya.

Typing papers straight through was an ordeal. Plagiarism was tougher too. One had to do one's own math (except for * ,/, ^, log on a slide rule).

They did buy me a (loaded) dual holster gun belt though.

Hopefully the online thing will burst the college tuition bubble.

15 posted on 02/06/2012 5:22:47 PM PST by Paladin2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek

My opinion is that at age 16, the student and his parents could opt for the student to attend a trade school.

We have a real need for well trained carpenters, auto mechanics, child care personnel, and the like in this country. Many people just aren’t geared for the academic life.

I think we would get a lot more bang for our bucks if we offered kids the choice at a certain age to take a different path other than straight academics.


16 posted on 02/06/2012 5:24:30 PM PST by basil (It's time to rid the country of "gun free zones" aka "Killing Fields")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah
Should High School Graduation be Mandatory?

That reminds me of a recurring nightmare I had well into my thirties. I would dream that I was still in school, at my then-current age, and failing my classes doomed not to graduate once again.

Strangely enough I did graduate high school and was never held back a grade.
I guess my subconscious knew that was a fraud! lol

17 posted on 02/06/2012 5:26:55 PM PST by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2; basil
'We Found a Place Where Our Children's Safety Would Never Be An Issue' An interview with a cyber school parent
18 posted on 02/06/2012 5:31:00 PM PST by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Making it mandatory til 18 will not guarantee they actually graduate. We have many kids now who just ride out the system til theyre 16, adding 2 more years only increases the amount the tax payer is on the hook for. Gotta get their 2 square meals a day.
Anybody thought about the increase in crime in schools? Schools will become even worse playgrounds for thuggery. This is not a real solution to any problem. Its political pandering to all those with their heads firmly rectally implanted and no clue about kids or education.


19 posted on 02/06/2012 5:32:38 PM PST by Partysnobz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Partysnobz

“Anybody thought about the increase in crime in schools?”

Yup. See post 6. I am sure there are the teens who are bright and want to get their GED and go on to bigger and better things. However, I unfortunately hear about and see the teens who are being “forced” to stay. Not a pretty sight at all.


20 posted on 02/06/2012 5:37:04 PM PST by momtothree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah
Must government micromanage every single aspect of every persons life? Must government mandate every decession we make? I think the whole concept of trying to make every student college ready is insane. For that matter I think beginning in the ninth grade schools should divide into two separate directions. One direction is needed for for Voc/Tech and the other direction for college prep with classes focused accordingly. End the mandatory four years of high school English and focus on what skills they will need to function in a job.

I also believe apprenticeships should be used again in place of high school VOC/Tech classes if possible. Let a kid learn their trade or better yet trades through OJT. Most of all I believe the feral {no I did not misspell federal LOL} government should get out of regulation of education all together.

21 posted on 02/06/2012 5:37:23 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: basil

We can easily say you have to stay in school until 18 but those that aren’t college material get trade school. At 15 or 16, girls who aren’t cut for calculus start learning cooking or childcare or electronic assembly or hair dressing or one year nursing assistant programs. Boys who would otherwise drop out learn drafting, plumbing, electrical work, pest control, carpentry, basic computer maintenance.
Kids get an education to be productive upon adulthood. And if they hit 18 and don’t like the career they picked at 16, they can choose to go to junior college on their own dime, as is their right now.


22 posted on 02/06/2012 5:37:30 PM PST by tbw2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Don’t outlaw homeschooling. Privatize all education.


23 posted on 02/06/2012 5:38:07 PM PST by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of rotten politics smelled around the planet.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah
Mandatory graduation? That will make a high school diploma almost worthless. The education system of passing kids to the next grade when they haven't learned to read at that level just handicaps them in the next grade.

Put the kids that can't read or write or hack school into trade schools and industrial training. Maybe if some kids see their future as janitors or dishwashers they'll think about their education a little more. A lot won't but, that's life.

24 posted on 02/06/2012 5:40:30 PM PST by Harley (Will Rogers never met Harry Reid.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

We already graduate functional illiterates in the name of affirmative action.


25 posted on 02/06/2012 5:44:33 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (FOREIGN AID: A transfer of money from poor people in rich countries to rich people in poor countries)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]



He didn't donate

Click the Pic

Sign up to donate monthly
A sponsoring FReeper will contribute $10
For each new monthly sign-up

26 posted on 02/06/2012 5:45:26 PM PST by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
Thnx for the link, checked it out.

It's great for motivated families. Likely very cost efficient too.

It definitely solves the behavioral issues in the modern classroom where all are mainstreamed (which finally drove my wife to retire from a school near you).

Tracking the actively interested learners from the gotta-be-there's is a huge efficiency, but not part of no child left behind (aka no children out on point).

27 posted on 02/06/2012 5:55:56 PM PST by Paladin2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: momtothree
My dad dropped out and joined the Navy right as WW2 ended. When he got out he got a G.E.D. and a 45 year career at Ma Bell. However while in the Navy he did so well on his testing that they sent him to Fire Control Technican School. That involved back then doing very complex math. My dad had just gotten bored with school.

I did finish high school. I remember when I got too my ship after basic training running into several classmates from high school that dropped out in their sophmore or junior year LOL. That was 36 years ago. They still did OK for themselves in the long run though.

28 posted on 02/06/2012 5:58:27 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah
Two things:

1. A Federal Mandate to attend school until the age of 18? Do these people have no boundaries in how far they will go to look stupid?

2. Speaking of stupid, about a third of the kids in America are not smart enough to ever pass a GED test. Ever. Lots of them can work with their hands, their back...and some very brain challenging tasks too...but they'll never pass a math test or English Comprehension test.

We need to bring back Metal Shop, Wood Shop and Auto Shop. FFA. Any and all sundry variety of education in the trades.

The idea that every kid can learn book learnin' is ludicrous on it's face, much less every kid needs to go to college!

I've met a couple of teachers and of course they have a college degree...dumb as rocks. Can't perform simple calculations in their head and are equally challenged with the written and spoken word.

29 posted on 02/06/2012 6:08:42 PM PST by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

The President doesn’t have the Constitutional authority to make such a mandate. Nor did Carter have any authority to create a Dept. of Education. And sorry to say on the Gipper’s B-Day, (The best Pres in my lifetime) but Reagan missed a prime opportunity to get rid of this beast during both his terms. In fact he aided it.


30 posted on 02/06/2012 6:10:40 PM PST by uptoolate (Republican's sure do like their liberalism)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2

“Voting against rats should be mandatory.” Amen, Amen, Amen!


31 posted on 02/06/2012 6:11:48 PM PST by taterjay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Mariner

I suck at math on paper but if you put it in the real world I’m fine. I’ll never be a rocket scientist but I made a damn fine factory foreman.


32 posted on 02/06/2012 6:15:26 PM PST by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Mariner
In high school I took what was basic and remedial courses in Math, Science, English, and History. That was in the early 1970’s. My junior and senior year I took a vocational course in refrigeration and basic electricity. My senior year I actually worked full time 8-5 in a car A/C repair shop. I did car heating and air repairs. I was also drawing a decent pay check.

By the next fall I was in the Navy and worked on the carriers large chill water A/C units and walk in refrigerators. When I got out I went to VOC/Tech twice. Once was for more refrigeration training and then I tool an industrial wiring course afterward.

Even though I had to retire medically at age 36 I had learned several trades. While in school I worked at a V.A. cemetery and learned some basic tractor/front end loader operations. I was also in the national guards at that time and took an interest too truck driving. So I took a commercial driving course and drove an 18 wheeler till till my other field opened up and the early 1980’s recession ended. I worked as a clerk a few months.

Last job I was a maintenance mechanic on a 50 acre health care facility. Duties there included boiler operation, HVAC operator/mechanic, Electrician. Plumber, and carpenter. My specialties were the HVAC and all electrical trouble shooting repairs etc.

The ability too learn jobs fast despite learning issues I had with book studies kept me in work and made it easier for me to find other work when a job ended due too economics. I have my high school diploma. Could I pass the G.E.D. today? No. Do I have a higher quality education than many graduating today? Likely so. The basics stuck with me. Kids are not learning the basics today. They are learning only too take test.

33 posted on 02/06/2012 7:46:10 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
Should high school graduation be mandatory?

No.

Mandatory education, if it exists at all, should end after eighth grade.

High school should be both voluntary and conditional on good behavior and satisfactory progress towards a diploma.

34 posted on 02/06/2012 7:50:27 PM PST by Jim Noble ("The Germans: At your feet, or at your throat" - Winston Churchill)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Jim Noble
>”Mandatory education, if it exists at all, should end after eighth grade”<

You got that right. If it was good enough for Jethro Bodine, it's good enough for the entire country.

Remember, Jethro had a multifaceted career. He was an Actor, a Playboy, a Banker, a Doctor, a Lawyer, a Casting Agent, the list goes on and on.

35 posted on 02/06/2012 8:13:30 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (Liberals, Useful Idiots Voting for Useless Idiots...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Kickass Conservative
Jethro was an exaggerated character written into a TV comedy script. My first wife's dad could tear down and repair anything from a VW too a 671 Detroit Diesel powered tractor trailer. He was a Master Mechanic and worked for the largest truck leasing company in the country before retirement. His last grade of completion? I think he said 8th grade. He begin rebuilding bicycles as a kid and worked up. He was also a good carpenter. Somewhere along the way he did an Honorable four year hitch as a member of the USMC as well.

But then again some college professors lack enough common sense too drive themselves too and from campus. They can't quite grasp the concept of how to operate a motor vehicle nor traffic flow etc.

There was also this other man who was a drop out. His name was Dave Thomas. The man who founded Wendy's. Thomas later in life stated dropping out was a mistake. I think it may not have been quite true for him in his case. His dropping out is what lead him too meeting and working for a very important person. His idea for the square burger likely came when he was 12 years old working in Knoxville, Tennessee for the Regas Brothers at an upscale restaurant.

About a block away from their restaurant was a fast food burger place at the time either called Blue Circle or Krystal but I'm almost certain it was Blue Circle. Hard to remember back 40 years. But I do remember both places. Blue Circle has been gone since the early 70's and Regas closed down a couple years ago. The burger joint though served a square burger similar to Krystal and White Castle. He lived in Knoxville likely a couple of years.

Later at about age 16 close to the age he dropped out he met Harland Sanders the founder of KFC. Sanders took him under his wing and later Thomas used his gained knowledge from the Regas Brothers and Sanders to launch his own chain. Had Thomas not dropped out? He likely would have never met Sanders. Thomas dropped out of high school because his parents were moving too another city and he wished to remain where they were living according to his Bio. But had he not stayed he may not have met Sanders and gained Sanders knowledge and influence. Thomas may have never been who he was.

Many persons mistake dropping out of school as the end of learning and that simply is not true. By the eighth grade though unless a person is college bound they likely have acquired most of the basic PRACTICAL knowledge that our education system can provide that they will actually need anyway. There needs to be some practical, realistic, & suitable alternatives to three R's high school. That alone would lower the drop out rate considerably in itself.

36 posted on 02/06/2012 9:18:10 PM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: cva66snipe
If I may, I was joking around. Didn't intend to offend any of my fellow FReepers.

About a year ago I found out my Father never finished High School. He's 88 and he never mentioned it.

That being said, he served in the U.S. Navy in WWII. He went to Trade School on the G.I. Bill after the War and started an Automotive Repair Business with his Brother. He raised a Family and had many jobs in the Automotive field after he sold the business. He Retired when he was 75 or so.

An Education is only as good as the person who achieved it.

37 posted on 02/06/2012 9:56:15 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (Liberals, Useful Idiots Voting for Useless Idiots...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: cva66snipe
If I may, I was joking around. Didn't intend to offend any of my fellow FReepers.

About a year ago I found out my Father never finished High School. He's 88 and he never mentioned it.

That being said, he served in the U.S. Navy in WWII. He went to Trade School on the G.I. Bill after the War and started an Automotive Repair Business with his Brother. He raised a Family and had many jobs in the Automotive field after he sold the business. He Retired when he was 75 or so.

An Education is only as good as the person who achieved it.

38 posted on 02/06/2012 10:00:24 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (Liberals, Useful Idiots Voting for Useless Idiots...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

A few years ago, I was talking to the retiring high school principal of my local district.

When asked what the biggest mistake he saw during his many years running the school, he said that moving the dropout age to 18 was the worst.

His view was that many kids dropped out at 16 and experienced just how bad life would be for them before they reached adulthood. More than half came back to school and studied with renewed vigor and usually graduated. Another group would come back and request transcripts so they could start GED programs. He figured that less than 20 percent of dropouts never got a degree.

Once they couldn’t drop out at 16, they would spend two destructive years in school, usually truant, and racking up suspensions and expulsions when they were forced to attend. Once they reached 18, they still dropped out and the number of former students who got diplomas was far smaller. Dropouts were gone and often heading down a very bad path.


39 posted on 02/06/2012 10:05:03 PM PST by MediaMole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Kickass Conservative

Ooops sorry about that.. LOL.


40 posted on 02/07/2012 12:35:35 AM PST by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: momtothree

I agree with all you stated, MTT in #6. I don’t see how any FReepers could flame you for your opinion on this.


41 posted on 02/07/2012 4:26:29 AM PST by octex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: cva66snipe

My brother was a HS dropout. Bored. He went on to get his GED, and eventually a Phd. He is the smartest person I know.


42 posted on 02/07/2012 4:41:21 AM PST by MomwithHope (Every American should read Ameritopia by Mark Levin!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: gabriellah

Warehousing kids in school and keeping them away from real world experience for an extra two years doesn’t do a thing for the kid - - but in the short term reduces unemployment.

It’s all about reducing the labor force to make the numbers look good.


43 posted on 02/07/2012 4:47:10 AM PST by finnsheep
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Rebelbase
Rebelbase said:My 20 year old son will tell you that pulling him out of public school his SR. year and enrolling in an online school was the best thing for him.

He did one year of college and hated every minute of general education. He’s in his 2nd semester of intensive welding classes and is ga-ga gonzo for learning it and the math, science and analytical skills that go along with the program.

Interesting. My son who is a member of Mensa but hates school started a 10 month intensive welding school yesterday. I hope he sticks with it.

I'm currently taking a basic algebra class at my local community college. I received my B.S.degree in 1981 and now want to get another degree in science. Whereas I once hated math and that took chemistry and physics off the table, I've now made a truce with algebra and plan on moving on to higher math in future semesters. So, my algebra 101 class is filled with a few serious adults and a host of kids who really do not pay any attenion to literally anything that is going on. They are, sorry to say more interested in texting their friends and having fun. It really is mind boggling to me.

In prep for taking the COMPASS placement test, I studied basic math and pre-algebra on my own for 5 weeks. I actually scored high enough to take an intermediate algebra course but I really want to have a rock solid understanding of algebra. On my own and using a $15.00 self help book, I taught myself more in 5 weeks than the public school system taught me in 12 years. Hard to believe but true.

Granted, there are sucess stories from public school education, my daughter now in 12th grade in AP in everything, takes caluclus and is in a guaranteed seat in a Pharmacy D program. All I have to do is figure out how to pay for it.

44 posted on 02/07/2012 5:31:43 AM PST by fatboy (This protestant will have no part in the ecumenical movement)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson