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How Much Water Is Enough?
Modern Survival Blog ^ | 4/9/12 | Ken

Posted on 04/09/2012 4:19:37 PM PDT by Kartographer

If you like food as much as I do, it’s hard to imagine that our body can actually go weeks without food. It wouldn’t be fun, of course, but it can be done. But without water, our bodies can get into serious trouble quickly – just a matter of days before dehydration can set in. So why is it that many people keep lots of extra food stored in their houses, but neglect to store any water?

This subject came to mind recently when my cousin told me about having to endure a power outage with no drinkable water. Since power outages often impact water treatment facilities, tap water can be unsafe for drinking. The situation was made worse by the fact that her child had vomiting and diarrhea, which meant that there was an even greater need for drinking water, as well as water for cleaning, sanitation and hand washing.

For instance, a mixture of water and chlorine bleach would have greatly assisted in sanitizing around her child, helping to ensure that others didn’t also get sick. And obviously, you wouldn’t want to clean up after such a mess without being able to thoroughly wash your hands. (As a dad, I know that’s NOT fun!) Finally, water for food preparation is a supply you’ll need over and above what you plan to drink.

(Excerpt) Read more at modernsurvivalblog.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: preparedness; prepperping; preppers; selfreliance; shtf; survivalping
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To: Uncle Ike
Commercially bottled water can reasonably be relied upon to contain next-to-nothing in the way of heavy metal, chemical, or biological contaminants off-the-shelf.. (Our litigious society has seen to that..)

Damn those Litigators.

51 posted on 04/09/2012 7:00:40 PM PDT by Doe Eyes
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To: Doe Eyes
Back in the day we just skimmed off the top of the cesspool under the privy.

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52 posted on 04/09/2012 7:07:26 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: driftdiver

As long as positive pressure is maintained in the water mains, no “nastiness” will get back into the pipes from a break. Now if some terrorist has hooked up a negative pressure backflow scenario, look out, just sayin....


53 posted on 04/09/2012 7:37:39 PM PDT by The FIGHTIN Illini (Beware of politicians saying they can fix anything)
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To: Kartographer

Having water for short term is great but having filtered water sources will seem like heaven. We live near all kinds of rivers, pond, lakes, and streams, so we have plenty of water filtering capabilities.


54 posted on 04/09/2012 7:41:28 PM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
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To: ctdonath2

“The problem with bottled water is the bottle: it degrades over time and is made to be landfill firendly, not long term storage friendly. Expect leaks.”

What about pouring the store-bought bottled water (usually in plastic containers) into 5/10 gallon glass jugs, for any long term storage, and kept out of sunlight?


55 posted on 04/09/2012 7:45:25 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: goodnesswins
Does it need to be 78% hypochlorite? (Hard to find)

Nah. Plain Clorox bleach will do. Here, check this out: Emergency Water Purification

56 posted on 04/09/2012 8:12:00 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Kartographer
An argument for boiling ALL water first: Cryptosporidium, Small, Crude and Deadly
57 posted on 04/09/2012 8:14:37 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Sarajevo

NO...I’m trying to avoid Clorox Bleach....it dies out after about 6 months.....


58 posted on 04/09/2012 8:37:43 PM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: PA Engineer; Kartographer

Thanks


59 posted on 04/09/2012 8:40:23 PM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: goodnesswins

That’s a good reason to practice rotating your stocks.


60 posted on 04/09/2012 8:45:31 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Sarajevo

You need to look at post 37....I don’t generally use Bleach...I use vinegar....so I don’t NEED to rotate bleach...and I don’t want to buy it so I can throw it away 6 months later.


61 posted on 04/09/2012 8:50:58 PM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: goodnesswins

I hope you don’t have Giardia in your water supply.


62 posted on 04/09/2012 9:03:35 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: raybbr

I have read that plastic containers like 55 gallon drums should never be stored directly on concrete so be mindful of that.


63 posted on 04/09/2012 9:07:08 PM PDT by goosie
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To: Sarajevo

The problem with long term dependence on boiling water is energy. It takes a lot of fuel to boil water. If you live somewhere with a lot of trees not a problem. live somewhere like the desert sw problem.


64 posted on 04/09/2012 9:50:35 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: goodnesswins

Would you mind telling us what you do with the vinegar to sterilize water?

I’ve done some searching and can find very little reference to it. I can understand the acidic nature of vinegar would help kill pathogens but the only reference I found said it required a very strong concentration of vinegar.


65 posted on 04/10/2012 4:20:03 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Wuli

The problem is how many glass jugs you’d need. People seriously underestimate how much water they use in a day: that’s one gallon per person per day for bare minimum; for a family of four that’s 28 gallon jugs just for one week. You’re not going to have enough on hand for anything other than keeping you alive long enough to find a persistent water source (and fighting off everyone else who wants it too).

Anecdote:
I moved near a large lake, comforted that in an extreme case there was plenty of water nearby. A bit hard to get to, but and endless supply when gotten to.
Then the drought hit.
And the ACoE trusted an obviously broken depth gauge.
I mean a serious drought.
And the gauge was really stupidly blatantly obviously broken but they used it anyway.
And then the city of Atlanta and most surrounding areas were faced with no water - I mean NO water - in 30 days.
What happens when four million rednecks can’t flush?


66 posted on 04/10/2012 5:47:42 AM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: Wuli

There’s a reason why when home canning, we boil our jars before filling them. How are you going to sterilize a 10 gallon glass jug before you pour the water into it?


67 posted on 04/10/2012 6:13:45 AM PDT by bgill
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To: thackney
Longer term prepping must use water production/filtration.

Indeed. I have some cases of water stored in sealed containers but for long term drinking water, I just obtained one of these.

Sterasyl Inline GAC Siphon Filter

It will be set up with a couple of 5 gallon buckets. I feel better now but have to get on with obtaining large containers to hold the water I will be filtering.

I'm trying to locate inexpensive blue 55 gallon sealables.

68 posted on 04/10/2012 6:15:30 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (I will not comply. I will NEVER submit.)
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To: Kartographer
Easier to store pool shock (Calcium Hypochlorite) and make your own bleach solution.

Yes! Clorox has a shelf life. Usually 18-24 months at the max. Then it loses efficacy.

That's why I keep powered pool shock, vac sealed in mylar. Now THAT's long term water purification.

69 posted on 04/10/2012 6:22:51 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (I will not comply. I will NEVER submit.)
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To: patton
And another freeper looks out the window, and says, “What are you talking about? We are having a drought.”

And another Freeper rubs his hands together and smiles as his rain catching system refills his indoor 53 gallon water tank.

70 posted on 04/10/2012 6:34:34 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (I will not comply. I will NEVER submit.)
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To: driftdiver

Sorry....I don’t sterilize water with vinegar....I use it in place of bleach for cleaning around the house and in my washing machine with each load. I was responding to someone who seems to insist I MUST have liquid bleach at all times, instead of the pool shock I’m looking for.


71 posted on 04/10/2012 9:15:43 AM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: driftdiver; Kartographer

I did find these, though...regarding using grapefruit seed extract and Hydrogen Peroxide and other products...

http://www.ehow.com/how_6962639_purify-water-grapefruit-seed-extract.html

http://inspectapedia.com/water/Drinking_Water_Purification5.htm


72 posted on 04/10/2012 9:44:21 AM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: goodnesswins

I purchased the GLB Super Charge product from poolgeek.com. Check the ingredients to make sure you get the right one. The one I purchased is 57% Calcium Hypochlorite.

Make a working stock by dissolving one heaping teaspoon (approx .25 oz) in two gallons of water. Use a plastic or glass container (not metal). This concentrated chlorine solution should be mixed with the water to be treated at a ratio of 1 part chlorine stock to 100 parts water (1 pint to 12.5 gallons of water)

Safety Precautions:
When purchasing calcium hypochlorite, make sure to get the kind that has only calcium hypochlorite. Do not use the varieties that contain additives. Sodium hypochlorite is a very powerful oxidizer and mixing it with oil can result in a fire.


73 posted on 04/10/2012 9:45:56 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: goodnesswins

IMO its handy to have this information available but its not my primary plan. I have multiple ways to purify drinking water. First is a simple 3 stage home built filter. It uses sand, DE powder, and charcoal to filter contaminates out of water. Then I plan to put the water through my berky and finally will probably add a little of the chlorine solution depending on the original source.

If its rain water I’ll probably only do the 3 stage filter. I also have a backpacking pump filter which does a pretty good job.

Bad water kills lots of people every year, not in the USA currently but in less developed countries. IF TSHTF here I can guarantee that many sources of surface water will quickly be contaminated with garbage, sewage, and perhaps bodies. There are some really nasty diseases spread through the water. Even if it only makes you sick it would reduce your strength and ability to cope with a myriad of other problems.

Oh and I agree vinegar has many excellent uses for cleaning and disinfecting.


74 posted on 04/10/2012 9:57:06 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver

Thanks for all the info....so, what you (and others) are saying is you can purchase a lower % of hypochlorite, but adjust the formula for use in water purification. And, yes, water is kind of my issue...my husband finally got on board...I bought a Berkey filter (haven’t tried it yet)....and have stored many Litres of water in a cool, dry, dark (hidden) place....that we rotate annually.


75 posted on 04/10/2012 10:07:52 AM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: goodnesswins

The process of using hypochlorite is used around the world so its a proven method.

If you have the black fliters for your berky check them. They had some problems a while back where the base of the filter separated from the rest of it. Caused them to leak unfiltered water into the bottom. A simple google search will give you more info on it.


76 posted on 04/10/2012 10:14:27 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: goodnesswins
I was responding to someone who seems to insist I MUST have liquid bleach at all times, instead of the pool shock I’m looking for.

Where did you ever get the idea that I was "insisting" anything?

77 posted on 04/10/2012 10:33:26 AM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Kartographer
live somewhere like the desert sw problem.

Not really! It's just a different technique.

This thing really works. If you dig a shallow trench around the perimeter of the hole, you can even pour lightly contaminated water in it and the heat will cause distilled water to evaporate out.

78 posted on 04/10/2012 10:39:18 AM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Sarajevo
Here in New Mexico the hole would be constantly full of sand or more water would evaporate than would get cleaned.
79 posted on 04/10/2012 11:37:05 AM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Sarajevo

Your repeating that I needed LIQUID bleach kinda led me there....forgive me if I misunderstood....as I said I was looking for info on hypochlorite granules.


80 posted on 04/10/2012 11:45:06 AM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
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To: driftdiver; Kartographer

Where can one get sodium hypoclorite and what is the raito to mix with water for making bleach?

Could anyone provide this info?

Actually, we have plans to catch and purify rain water and we’re getting a hand pump for our well.

AD


81 posted on 04/11/2012 7:19:42 AM PDT by appalachian_dweller (Live each day as if it's your last. It might be.)
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To: driftdiver; Kartographer

Please disregard last post, found your link Kart.

sorry folks....


82 posted on 04/11/2012 7:23:04 AM PDT by appalachian_dweller (Live each day as if it's your last. It might be.)
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To: appalachian_dweller

I posted my source up thread. poolgeek.com but make sure to check the ingredients.


83 posted on 04/11/2012 7:24:48 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: bgill

maybe by rinsing them with bleach and then rinsing them out with distilled water


84 posted on 04/11/2012 4:36:17 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: ctdonath2

“that’s one gallon per person per day for bare minimum; for a family of four that’s 28 gallon jugs just for one week”

(1) if you have independent power generation for refrigeration/freezer (and other things as well) there are some liquids you can keep frozen/refrigerated that can be counted in your “one gallon per person per day” - such as: milk & juices

(2) many pre-bottled (in glass) drinks, with a long shelf-life, also can be counted in that “one gallon per person per day” - like the “Snapple” teas for example

(3) and if I were using 5 gallon glass jugs - like the old “Poland Springs” water jugs, that would be 5.6 5-gallon jugs for “one week”, but then again, given (1) & (2), they would actually serve for longer than one week; and if one had ten or 20 of such 5 gallon jugs - much longer


85 posted on 04/11/2012 5:01:59 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: ctdonath2

“What happens when four million rednecks can’t flush?”

I guess, you have a “honey pot” factory - if you live in a place like Korea, or your neighborhood has a lot of outdoor “latrines”.


86 posted on 04/11/2012 5:05:33 PM PDT by Wuli
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