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VIDEO: 'Flipped Classrooms' Aid Student Learning
Michigan Capitol Confidential ^ | 5/2/2012 | Michael Van Beek

Posted on 05/04/2012 12:14:08 PM PDT by MichCapCon

Technology enables schools to rethink the way that they deliver instruction to students, and a recent phenomenon that’s catching on is called “flipping the classroom.”

It works by having students receive direct instruction — often via online videos — outside of the classroom, enabling teachers to devote more time to collaboration, project-based learning, developing critical thinking skills and mentoring students individually.

Clintondale High School in Metropolitan Detroit has flipped all of its classrooms, and may be the first school in Michigan to do so.

Based on just their short experience with this model, it appears to be a remarkable success. According to Principal Greg Green, since exclusively using the flipped classroom, the school has dropped their failure rates for freshmen in English from 52 percent to 19 percent, in math from 44 percent to 13 percent, in science from 41 percent to 19 percent and in social studies from 28 percent to 9 percent. And this is a school that one might reasonably expect to have higher than average failure rates, since 70 percent of it students come from low-income households.

For more information about Clintondale High School’s story, see the video below...

(Excerpt) Read more at michigancapitolconfidential.com ...


TOPICS: Education
KEYWORDS: education; learning; schools; teaching

1 posted on 05/04/2012 12:14:16 PM PDT by MichCapCon
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To: Springman; Sioux-san; 70th Division; JPG; PGalt; DuncanWaring

I’m not sure what to make of this. It sounds like online schooling in school with the teacher taking the place of a parent.

If anyone wants on the Michigan Cap Con ping list, let me know.


2 posted on 05/04/2012 12:19:07 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: MichCapCon

Public schools are soooo 20th century.

Khanacademy.org


3 posted on 05/04/2012 12:20:35 PM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: cripplecreek

It’s coming! And very fast!

I completed my Master’s degree online and never set foot on the campus. If they can do it for college degrees, they can do it for kids.

Then again, how to proctor the children? If parents are off to work and the kid is home alone, are they just going to require that every kid have a webcam setup to monitor them? Then what? Will the teachers need to have a dual-monitor setup with 30 individual feeds into the kids’ living rooms?


4 posted on 05/04/2012 12:26:42 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: cripplecreek

“I’m not sure what to make of this. It sounds like online schooling in school with the teacher taking the place of a parent.”

And the online video taking the place of the teacher. Something is very wrong with Teacher’s Ed in this country.


5 posted on 05/04/2012 12:30:12 PM PDT by ari-freedom
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To: rarestia

I like the idea of cyber schooling but it needs to be from home and lazy students with lazy parents will still fail.

I wish he had online schooling back in the olden days of the early 80s.


6 posted on 05/04/2012 12:34:59 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: ari-freedom
And the online video taking the place of the teacher.

Next step after online video is online video game. Have the students compete in their league from home for rewards points. Instead of the state spending $9,000/year per student on schools, make it so the average student can win $6,000/year in prizes and awards, and have the taxpayers pocket the difference. That's a lot of iPads, iPods, and other toys. Everyone can have a charmed childhood, trendy clothes, smart phones, etc, in want of nothing. And no union workers filling their heads with mush!

7 posted on 05/04/2012 12:41:22 PM PDT by Reeses
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To: rarestia

Public school teachers could be out of the picture.

I believe that K12.com wants an adult to be present when the student is on-line, and that could be anyone the parent wants it to be.

I can see brick and mortar schools going the way of the dinosaur. Public school personnel should be shaking in their shoes. Taxpayers will realize they don’t need “flipped classrooms.” Get rid of the middleman.


8 posted on 05/04/2012 12:42:08 PM PDT by goldi
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To: cripplecreek

I did my Master’s thesis on teleworking and the lack of adoption by US firms despite more and more global corporations embracing it. One article I used discussed the increasing use of teleducation in secondary schools as a supplement to classroom teaching.

I proposed that with increased adoption of teleworking in America, the increase in teleducation will be notable since more parents will be homebound and capable of monitoring their children.

IF this comes to pass, it would make sense to cut back the number of days students are required to be in a physical classroom with the goal being one or two days a week where the students can go to a classroom to ask questions, receive personal mentoring, and take exams while the majority of coursework would be done at home.

This would eliminate problems such as bullying, social stigmatization, social awkwardness, loafing, and a whole host of other issues. Just like homeschooling, there would be baselines and goals that would need to be met, but provided exams are passed and regular coursework is graded as satisfactory, I don’t see this as being problematic.

In addition, the at-home working parent could supplement the classroom teaching through religious education, for instance, or practical skills such as cooking or maintenance of the home.


9 posted on 05/04/2012 12:47:28 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Reeses

Don’t knock video gaming as practical. There are myriad companies working on interactive educational games that make learning enjoyable and rewarding for kids. It’s not the same as a Call of Duty or World of Warcraft video game experience, but there are plenty of studies going on right now as to the utility of this sort of learning.

I have two colleagues from graduate school who turned their theses on video gaming for education into full-blown careers in start-up IT ventures working on this very thing.


10 posted on 05/04/2012 12:50:23 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: goldi

I knew over a decade ago that this would be a better system- much like the old, one room school house with kids at different levels. The kids get online instruction and the teacher oversees that they’re working and helps out where needed. Seemed like a no brainer to me. I’m surprised it’s taken so long.


11 posted on 05/04/2012 12:50:47 PM PDT by pops88 (Standing with Breitbart for truth.)
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To: goldi
Public school teachers could be out of the picture.

That's one side effect, yes. See my post #9 for more on the subject.

This is something of intense interest to me. I don't personally believe you'll see the extinction of the public school teacher, but you are correct about the deprecation of brick-and-mortar schools. They'll be replaced with smaller facilities for multipurpose use.

There will ALWAYS be a need for effective educators, but that's the key word: effective. The ineffectual ninny riding out their tenure will go the way of the dodo in favor of educators who are smart, quick, and very competent in online education.

12 posted on 05/04/2012 12:56:16 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: cuban leaf

Khan’s GOT to be the way of the future, whether or not it’s able to continue without direct billings. What Michigan’s talking about is another teacher bail-out. Less work, more pay; more pap and what rhymes with pap.


13 posted on 05/04/2012 12:56:51 PM PDT by Mach9
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To: rarestia

“Don’t knock video gaming as practical.”

I worked with a renowned neurosurgeon that pioneered trans-nasal brain surgery. He credited his success to the huge amount of time he spent playing Nintendo as a kid. My daughter learned an impressive amount of world history by playing Age of Empires. She started on the computer at 18 months with Jump Start Toddler, and advanced to Reader Rabbit and a multitude of other educational games. She entered our local university at 13. Kids learn best when it’s fun.


14 posted on 05/04/2012 12:57:22 PM PDT by pops88 (Standing with Breitbart for truth.)
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To: MichCapCon

My wife is a teacher and her Texas district is going to a flipped classroom next year. Basically the kids are to learn at home and come to school to do homework. The parents are to supervise learning and the teachers supervise homework.

Great scam. Lets the district get rid of experienced teachers (who need them, the kids LEARN at home) and kids that fail are the parent’s fault — until they wait a few years to ask for extra money to reverse the process.


15 posted on 05/04/2012 12:58:22 PM PDT by pikachu (After Monday and Tuesday, even the calender goes W T F !)
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To: cripplecreek

I’ve read of people using the Khan Academy to do things similar to this. You get a top notch lecturer giving the lectures, and one-on-one help from the teachers for any rough spots. Seems like a win-win to me.

http://www.khanacademy.org/


16 posted on 05/04/2012 1:00:33 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: MichCapCon

This sounds like the teachers’ union version of homeschooling.


17 posted on 05/04/2012 1:02:26 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Do I really need a sarcasm tag? Seriously? You're that dense?)
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To: pops88
I knew over a decade ago that this would be a better system- much like the old, one room school house with kids at different levels.

It worked for my great grandmother and she graduated from the 9th grade with a better education than a good many modern college grads.
18 posted on 05/04/2012 1:03:15 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: MichCapCon

It turns out that most kids can learn arithmetic and reading better from a computer than from 1/30th of a teacher. Modern adaptive software understands what the kid already knows and uses that to select the next learning experience. Kids who get it can move as quickly as their capability allows. Teachers have more time to spend with kids who need help.


19 posted on 05/04/2012 1:03:24 PM PDT by AZLiberty (No tag today)
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To: MichCapCon

Excellent idea. Just drop the school part.


20 posted on 05/04/2012 1:05:19 PM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: rarestia

“IF this comes to pass, it would make sense to cut back the number of days students are required to be in a physical classroom with the goal being one or two days a week where the students can go to a classroom to ask questions, receive personal mentoring, and take exams while the majority of coursework would be done at home.”

Why ANY days at school? Proctored tests (and preferably entirely different tests) could be administered/taken in any local Elks lodge! Either find another use for the school buildings or raze them. Questions are as easily answered onscreen as inhouse. Once the teacher’s obsolete (and that happened a long time ago), all the federal/state/county education adjuncts are equally obsolete.


21 posted on 05/04/2012 1:06:50 PM PDT by Mach9
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To: Mach9
What Michigan’s talking about is another teacher bail-out. Less work, more pay; more pap and what rhymes with pap.

Michigan is also expanding the private online schooling. I suspect this is about public schools seeing their impending death and trying to get in on some of that action.
22 posted on 05/04/2012 1:07:14 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: cripplecreek

My observation...from the 1970’s atmosphere.

Around fifteen percent of all kids really don’t need a teacher more than three hours a week. You can hand workbooks out, give out five hours of homework per day, toss in History Channel-like DVDs to watch, and this group of fifteen percent will easily graduate by age 16 from any high school achievement test.

Around sixty percent of all kids need two full days of teacher instruction per week...with various homework projects inbetween, video-teleconferening when they run into problems, and they could all wrap up school by age 18.

The final group? The twenty-five percent group? They need massive coaching....day-in...day-out. Forget anything less than full class attendance and massive coaching.

The true answer is that we aren’t using our teaching manpower in the right fashion. Teachers hate my analysis of this because the gifted students really don’t want or need that much help. So teachers get stuck with the smaller group of screwed-up kids and putting in man-hours to bring them along. The positive side is that you could operate a classroom with twelve of these kids, and they might advance faster.


23 posted on 05/04/2012 1:16:07 PM PDT by pepsionice
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To: pops88; stylecouncilor

That’s very interesting.


24 posted on 05/04/2012 1:28:28 PM PDT by windcliff
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To: cripplecreek

The public schools know their factory designed model of education is not working anymore.

They know kids can learn without them with computer programs with only guidance from an adult who understands the material if they reach a block. Alot of computer program classrooms come with a human to help the child if they get stuck in a lesson. But the computer lessons are a million times more proficient than today’s teachers and zooy classrooms.

So they are trying to give the public school teachers and system a new role as “mentor” for the students with individual attention. Computer classrooms are going to be the way of the future for most education through college and the unions are trying to hang on to their gig through the transformation.


25 posted on 05/04/2012 1:32:14 PM PDT by SaraJohnson
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To: SaraJohnson
Computer classrooms are going to be the way of the future for most education through college and the unions are trying to hang on to their gig through the transformation.

Cheaper and far more efficient. The dinosaurs are looking up and beginning to notice that star in the heavens is growing bigger and brighter. Their walnut sized brains are beginning to realize that there may be danger approaching.
26 posted on 05/04/2012 1:38:35 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: pikachu

And parents are going to go along with this? They’ll go to their jobs during the day and at night they’ll do what the teacher should be doing during the day?

Good luck with that. Parents are going to figure out pretty quickly that if they are the ones who are going to do the heavy lifting at home, they certainly aren’t going to pay taxes to support teachers who are going to “supervise homework.”

They might as well pull their kids out and homeschool them.


27 posted on 05/04/2012 1:49:15 PM PDT by goldi
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To: rarestia

This sounds to me like the educational continuum is moving in the direction of homeschooling. Many of the parents you describe in your scenario will end up homeschooling altogether, as it’s not much of stretch. They will realize they can educate their kids as well or better without the “school.”


28 posted on 05/04/2012 1:53:10 PM PDT by Disambiguator
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To: goldi

Exactly.

It took John Dewey and his Socialist apostles 80 years to brainwash parents to think of “teachers” as being other than parents. The best teachers and most important teachers of children should be the parents. Brilliant people who were based in individualism were homeschooled-—not conditioned and brainwashed (and humiliated) in the Prussian system designed for mass conformity —to conform to the Marxist ideology where you are only allowed to think one way (sodomy is good, there is no God, Right and Wrong are relative, The Bible is myth, Evolution is true, Atheism is intellectually superior, etc.) All to destroy Virtue and Goodness in the child and confuse them, so they can never think logically, with reason and intellect. They are taught emotional responses—to let the emotions rule their world—and ditch intellectual pursuit (maturity). All past true knowledge of the Ancient Greeks, Locke, Adam Smith, Founders, Thomas Reid are eliminated, so there is no understanding or critical discussions of ideology. Children are told what to think by the Al Gore’s brainwashing/conditioning movies which twist facts and reality and glorify evil.

There is emotional and character development—crucial to the development of a “Virtuous” society essential for Freedom—only instilled by loving, concerned parents or family, which was destroyed by the curricula of moral relativism and socialism that Dewey injected into the curricula to get strangers to “mold” the “plastic minds” of the child. They intentionally destroyed curricula—destroyed phonics to deliberately create American children who were considered “dyslexic”—something deliberately created in the 30’s to cover up the deliberate destruction of logic and reason in schools and blame it on the genetics of family—or the home. Prior to the manipulation of curricula by Dewey, the Black family had a literacy rate of 90%. We are talking about a time of Jim Crow. The poor were the ones to first be destroyed by the forced public school educational system.

Parents need to take control over the education of their children and not “trust” strangers or just those “certified” by the Marxist government. They need to burn all the “approved” public school curricula which is destroying the worldview of our children and making them into “useful idiots”. It is intentional—by the Department of “Education”. It is documented by many people—including BK EAkman and John Taylor Gatto and thousands of books in the 1980’s-—Why Johnny Can’t Read—was based on facts.


29 posted on 05/04/2012 2:02:52 PM PDT by savagesusie (Right Reason According to Nature = Just Law)
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To: cripplecreek

“Cheaper and far more efficient.”

That’s what I expected, then discovered my daughter’s distance education (online) university classes cost more than if she’d taken them on campus. I was aghast that they were hundreds of dollars more with a slew of fees tacked on, including fees for services only used by on campus students. She watched videos online and did her exams online. It should have been a fraction of the cost.


30 posted on 05/04/2012 2:09:04 PM PDT by pops88 (Standing with Breitbart for truth.)
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To: MichCapCon

The liberals want to take better care of illegals, criminals and such than the tax paying general public.


31 posted on 05/04/2012 2:09:08 PM PDT by mountainlion (I am voting for Sarah after getting screwed again by the DC Thugs.)
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To: pops88
That’s what I expected, then discovered my daughter’s distance education (online) university classes cost more than if she’d taken them on campus.

That's what choices are for.
32 posted on 05/04/2012 2:11:41 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: rarestia
make learning enjoyable and rewarding for kids.

Healthy competition among peers is a powerful motivator for learning. Without that element, online learning can fall flat. Kids are naturally competitive and they like to win and impress their parents. The reason many kids drop out of school is they always lose, all because they are in the wrong league. With the internet, everyone can find their league and everyone can be a winner, at least some of the time if they try. We can maximize learning that way.

About Call of Duty type 3D games, there are some superhuman memory methods that rely on storing knowledge in a 3D map visualized in the mind. Humans are good at 3D memory from our hunter/gatherer days. A learning video game that has the student walk around in a 3D virtual world may reinforce knowledge retention. They can think back and walk through their memory. The days of union hirelings serving up a crappy socialist education are coming to an end!

33 posted on 05/04/2012 2:22:03 PM PDT by Reeses
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