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Meet the Left’s Founding Fathers
Conservative Daily News ^ | May 03, 2012 | Kyle Becker

Posted on 05/12/2012 8:38:47 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch

Patriotic Americans are raised with a respect for our Founding Fathers: Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington being among the most famous. But there is a sizable segment of our population who have little respect for these intellectual and political titans; instead they admire a roster of radicals, revolutionaries, and reprobates.

Rather than regurgitate a stale description of these great thinkers’ ideas, which is available all over the Internet, we shall take an irreverent look at what makes these figures significant in the minds of leftists. A quick look at the “Dirty Thirty” will hopefully be on some counts informative and illuminating.

1. Plato

Proto-communist philosopher of ancient Greece. Non-coincidentally lived just prior to the fall of Athens. His Republic doesn’t so much resemble the self-titled system of government than a communist oligarchy ruled by philosopher-kings. Stratified by role, Plato’s ideal society is enforced by Guardians, a KGB-like police force that cracks down on the sheeple at the behest of the philosopher kings. Plato’s pre-Kantian notion of Forms would fuse with Christianity to dominate the aptly named Dark Ages. His advocacy of banishing private property was aptly rebuffed by Aristotle.

2. Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is revered for being a “saintly” figure in both Catholic and left-wing lore. His seminal novel Utopia, a Greek word meaning “Nowhere,” has stimulated countless flights into otherworldly fancy, and numerous quixotic and sometimes bloody attempts to superimpose fantasy on reality. In More’s novel, a world traveler regales the protaganist about a wonderful world where there is no private property, and everyone’s needs are provided for through compulsory labor. His book would inspire an entire genre of works categorized only as “utopian.”

3. Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Rousseau was a brilliant polemicist known to many as the “Father of the French Revolution.” His theorizing about the social contract is ample fodder for political science courses. Slightly less well-known is his counter to Hobbes’ description of a brutish state of nature in his savage noblesse, whose supposedly gentle nature implied civilization was a corrupter of man, rather than a life-edifying social arrangement, thus making him influential with the environmental left. His ideas can still be felt today in artificial constructs of society versus nature, particularly in regards to the industrial revolution. A bit of a sexual pervert, he enjoyed sado-masochism, like fellow leftist the Marquis de Sade.

4. Robespierre

The bloody French revolutionary known as Robespierre is perhaps the emblematic figure of The Enlightenment gone awry. His steely insistence on classically liberal concepts animated his deep desire to destroy the Ancien Regime and all it stood for. Unfortunately, the unethical means he advocated to accomplish his goals did not match his occasionally moral ends. His name would become synonymous with la Terreur; if Rousseau was the Father of the Revolution, Robespierre is the Father of Terrorism.

Keep reading...

 


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: left; leftism; rousseau
Take a stroll and view this gallery of histories most destructive characters.  Enemies of man and God.  Truly the devil's minions.

It culminates with the bio of Barack Hussein Obama.

 

1 posted on 05/12/2012 8:38:55 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch
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To: CaptainKrunch; potlatch; PhilDragoo; bitt

Great list of commie philosophers. A list of current worldwide operators would be welcome, too. Soros, of course. Gorbachev? Who else?


2 posted on 05/12/2012 8:56:57 AM PDT by ntnychik
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To: CaptainKrunch
Er... you are aware of the fact that St. Thomas More's "Utopia" was a satire, and not even remotely close to what he'd consider a serious "utopia", aren't you? Heavens, even the amorphous Wikipedia has that fact clear!
3 posted on 05/12/2012 9:08:28 AM PDT by paladinan (Rule #1: There is a God. Rule #2: It isn't you.)
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To: CaptainKrunch

Good list- thanks for posting.


4 posted on 05/12/2012 9:09:10 AM PDT by GenXteacher (You have chosen dishonor to avoid war; you shall have war also.)
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To: CaptainKrunch

As Arte Johnson used to say, “Verrrrry interesting.”


5 posted on 05/12/2012 9:12:58 AM PDT by Walrus (Can a president be impeached for stupidity?)
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To: ntnychik

Click on the link and check it out. The list progresses into the mordern era.


6 posted on 05/12/2012 9:15:01 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: CaptainKrunch

modern era.


7 posted on 05/12/2012 9:17:47 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: paladinan

Given More’s tendencies, that is debatable. But, whether or not More’s Utopia is a satire, there are a lot people who who believe otherwise. When I was taught about Utoptia in college, it was NOT taught as a satire. “Victor Suvorov,” a GRU defector who mentioned Utopia’s influence on Soviet policy, didn’t seem to think so either.


8 posted on 05/12/2012 9:22:17 AM PDT by Little Ray (FOR the best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
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To: paladinan
-His seminal novel Utopia, a Greek word meaning “Nowhere,” has stimulated countless flights into otherworldly fancy, and numerous quixotic and sometimes bloody attempts to superimpose fantasy on reality.-

I think what Becker is suggesting here is that More's Utopia has stimulated the totalitarian minded throughout history to act in the real world on the farsical concept of a utopian society.

 

9 posted on 05/12/2012 9:27:12 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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5. Immanuel Kant

Ayn Rand considered Immanuel Kant to be the arch-enemy of reason, mind, truth, and happiness. Through such works as the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant divorced reality from man’s ability to perceive it, and posed that reason was prostrate to directly know anything. Instead, he argued that men were imprisoned by their senses and doomed to grope in the dark for as long as they existed. His influence is widespread and ephemeral; Kant’s dark impress can be felt in the Zeitgeist since his day, expressed in extreme skepticism and pessimism. His works have done much to demoralize and infantalize man.

6. G.W.F. Hegel

One of the pre-eminent left-wing thinkers of modern times, he is known as an Uber-statist and the mentor of Karl Marx. One of the most significant contributions to the radical cause is his conceptualization of historical inevitability. He is widely acknowledged as among the first philosophers to imbue teleology into his thinking, and influence one sees in Marx’s pronouncement of the eventual triumph of socialism. Writing with an esoteric and borderline incomprehensible style, he is the archetype of the indecipherable intellectual. Rightfully called the Father of Totalitarianism.

7. Arthur Schopenhauer

A Gremlinesque figure whose scrawlings are extremely pessimistic and grim. His main argument is that all phenomena and universal life-force can be reduced to the Will. The universe wills itself to exist, like human beings will themselves to survive. His borderline nihilistic synopsis of the quintessence of life and existence presages Heidegger, and his emphasis on Will marks a transition point to Nietzsche’s Will to Power, so popular later with the National Socialists. His thoughts and works can be grouped with Kant’s and Hegel’s as reflective of German Idealism, staples of early (European) Continental Philosophy.

8. Ludwig Feuerbach

An often overlooked philosopher on the right, his views on religion are among the purest expressions of secular humanism one can find. Feuerbach was an atheist who believed that God is a projection of human beings’ self-alienated desires. God’s eternal nature is man’s wish for immortality; His Holiness is man’s wish to become sinless and pure; Heaven is a manifestation of man’s desire for a perfect world; and the Trinity is symbolic of desiring to become part of something while retaining identity. Feuerbach’s influence can also be seen in existentialist, atheist, and psychoanalytical circles.

The list continues...

 

10 posted on 05/12/2012 9:42:07 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: CaptainKrunch

Useless list.


11 posted on 05/12/2012 9:49:28 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: CaptainKrunch

That Plato was an enemy of man and God is only true in Ripley’s Believe It or Not.


12 posted on 05/12/2012 9:54:04 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: CaptainKrunch
The author omitted Malthus and Darwin.
13 posted on 05/12/2012 9:57:35 AM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: CaptainKrunch
Plato was Aristotle's teacher. Sure, they disagreed about a lot of things. But they'd probably come together to crush Kyle Becker like the annoying little bug he is.

If you want to do philosophy, you have to deal with people like Plato, Kant, and Hegel. Throw them out and you lose an important part of our Western heritage.

Growing up means coming to terms with the fact that that heritage is more than one political idea or the property of one political movement. It means entering into discussion with thinkers of different points of view.

Lumping Plato or Kant in with totalitarian politicians like Lenin and Trotsky, with clowns and near-clowns like Zizek and Derrida, and with whatever Obama is, is moronic and childish.

PS: 1) Has any informed adult seriously ever seriously suggested that Adorno and Horkheimer were lovers? 2) They have a photo of the wrong Gyorgy Lukacs on the webpage.

14 posted on 05/12/2012 10:04:21 AM PDT by x
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To: cornelis

That remark eminates from the mind of a mental midget.


15 posted on 05/12/2012 10:07:13 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: CaptainKrunch
Perhaps.

Here's a riddle. Why are the moderns taught in schools, but teaching Plato's Apology is under some sort of communist prohibition?

16 posted on 05/12/2012 10:16:58 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: CaptainKrunch

Interesting Article. Thanks for the post.


17 posted on 05/12/2012 10:17:22 AM PDT by khelus
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To: x
"Growing up means coming to terms with the fact that that heritage is more than one political idea or the property of one political movement. It means entering into discussion with thinkers of different points of view."

I'm not a suscriber to moral relativism, which is probably a basis for many who enter into discussions with those of a reprehensible point of view.

 

18 posted on 05/12/2012 10:26:57 AM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: CaptainKrunch
I'm not a suscriber to moral relativism, which is probably a basis for many who enter into discussions with those of a reprehensible point of view.

Are you sure about that? What Plato (or his version of Socrates) said was that you couldn't simply rely on what you already thought or believed or what authorities told you, but had to examine your ideas and beliefs and try to find some grounding for them. If I'm not mistaken, Kant said something similar. That search for truth might be futile but it's a long way from relativism.

19 posted on 05/12/2012 11:02:38 AM PDT by x
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To: CaptainKrunch

Most excellent post. Thanks.


20 posted on 05/12/2012 11:15:08 AM PDT by Jacquerie (No court will save us from ourselves.)
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To: CaptainKrunch

That was a good read.


21 posted on 05/12/2012 11:43:56 AM PDT by Yardstick
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To: ntnychik; potlatch; bitt; dixiechick2000

BARACCUS WHOSEANUS His melding of Marx's "from each until it bleeds, to me to meet my needs" with Mansonism's subjugation of all to the whims of a homicidal misogynist were sharpened by the crack pipe and supercharged by the billions of Soros and the legions of carping harpies and shrieking fairies of Gomorrah media. His reign crashed and burned as forecast by the Mayans and is largely ignored in the record.

22 posted on 05/12/2012 12:45:17 PM PDT by PhilDragoo (Hussein: Islamo-Commie from Kenya)
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To: x
The search for truth brought me to the truth of Jesus Christ.  And that's where the search ended, at the very source of truth itself.  Search over, truth found. 

The search for truth is from futile, but once you find the truth, then the philosophical assertions of corrupt, atheistic and sinful men become easy to discern when measured against the ulimate measuring stick, the words of Christ.  The point of view of the highest authority.

 



Mat 15:14  

Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.

 


23 posted on 05/12/2012 3:16:36 PM PDT by CaptainKrunch (Freedom is what's fair.)
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To: Little Ray
Sorry for the delay; work overwhelms!

Little Ray wrote:

Given More’s tendencies, [the idea that "Utopia" is a satire] is debatable.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by "tendencies"; as a faithful (and heroic) Catholic, his only ideal of utopia was Heaven; surely you knew that? And anyone who read his other writings couldn't possibly be fooled into thinking that he put much stock in "making a Heaven on earth" in any shape or form!

But, whether or not More’s Utopia is a satire, there are a lot people who who believe otherwise.<

I'm not sure about "a lot"... but even so, that would then translate into "a lot of people BELIEVE that ST. Thomas More was a 'founding father of the left'"... i.e. not reality.

When I was taught about Utoptia in college, it was NOT taught as a satire.

(*wry look*) I don't exactly have your confidence in the accuracy of my professors' political opinions, FRiend...

“Victor Suvorov,” a GRU defector who mentioned Utopia’s influence on Soviet policy, didn’t seem to think so either.

All right; but this shows only that nut-cases can take a work, misunderstand it, and run in any direction they please with it. By that standard, Jesus Christ was the quintessential "Founding Father of the Left", since He spoke repeatedly about caring for the poor, etc.!
24 posted on 05/17/2012 6:01:49 AM PDT by paladinan (Rule #1: There is a God. Rule #2: It isn't you.)
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To: CaptainKrunch
CptainKrunch wrote:

I think what Becker is suggesting here is that More's Utopia has stimulated the totalitarian minded throughout history to act in the real world on the farsical concept of a utopian society.

No arguments, so far as that goes. I suppose my only concern would be an actual inclusion of St. Thomas in a list of the "Founding Fathers of the Left"; it would be a rude slap in his face if he were "put there" by delusional souls in the past (and present) who misunderstood him completely, and who hailed him as a "champion" of things which he would almost certainly have despised!
25 posted on 05/17/2012 6:09:47 AM PDT by paladinan (Rule #1: There is a God. Rule #2: It isn't you.)
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To: paladinan

The political leanings of ALL professors should be regarded with skepticism. I certainly had my issues with them, even though I went to Furman (which, when I attended, was probably pretty conservative for an institute of “higher indoctrination”). The worst was a English teacher who thought the world had only gotten worse since the days of Charles Dickens. I used to think of it as the “Good ol’ Daze.” But that is pretty mild compared to most universities today.

The way people use “Utopia” or “Utopian” should be an indication as to how many people don’t seem realize that it is a satire. Most of the time, they’re not making fun of something when they use it, but praising it.

My personal recall is sparse, but the way I learned it, More was a very pious Catholic. So pious, in fact, that he longed to be a monk, but his duties prevented him from joining an Order.

We were taught that Utopia reflected his desire to be monk; he created a fictional nation that under a sort of monastic style rule and wrote of how it affected their economy, their lives, their relations with other nations, their military, etc. At least that is the “Utopia is not a satire” interpretation.

I like the “Utopia is a satire” interpretation much better. I actually a shudder a bit every time I hear a place or idea described as “Utopian.”


26 posted on 05/17/2012 8:02:05 AM PDT by Little Ray (FOR the best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
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