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To: CaptainKrunch

Our Declaration stated in Lockean terms that the purpose of government was to secure our Natural Rights. It also asserted that government can have no powers except such as are compatible with the end for which it was established; and it cannot act arbitrarily, depart from its own laws.

Our Constitution went further. Government may not violate these Natural Rights, nor assume powers it was not granted, nor delegate the law making power to other hands. If government violates these structures, it ceases to be legitimate and can, under certain conditions, be legitimately overthrown.

These Lockean, Jeffersonian ideals stand opposite to socialism.

The problem with Socialism is not that it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work because it is an assault on our Nature. Imagine an engineering design based on F=MV. It won’t work no matter how deeply the engineer wishes it to. Likewise, socialism cannot be forced to work in the civil society under our Declaration and Constitution.


7 posted on 05/19/2012 12:20:30 PM PDT by Jacquerie (No court will save us from ourselves.)
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To: Jacquerie
I was typing my response #8, while you were posting #7, which makes similar points.

Anyway, cheers Here is a little squib, where Edgar Allan Poe offers his insight into the fallacy of the British Utilitarians, who postulated a view of societal purpose more akin to that of that (utilitarian), which is basically assumed by Socialists: Poe On Mill & Bentham. (While Capitalism is actually more utilitarian than Socialism, the argument you employ, based upon Natural Rights, is by far the better argument for our side.)

William Flax

9 posted on 05/19/2012 12:35:28 PM PDT by Ohioan
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