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Public Schools Aren't About Academics Anymore
www.setourchildrenfree.com ^ | 5/17/12 | Tony Caruso

Posted on 05/21/2012 5:27:03 AM PDT by Guido2012

If you want to know what really goes on in our public schools, go to a teacher-of-the-year banquet. Here you will see why schools aren't about academics anymore. Educators will never admit it openly, but an event like this reveals so much that outsiders never get to see.


TOPICS: Education; Government; Politics; Society
KEYWORDS: acacedemics; academics; education; homeschool; homeschooling; learning; publiceducation; publicschools; selfesteem; teacher; teaching
I went to a “Teacher of the Year” banquet recently for the school district in which I live. There were 23 schools in this district, so it took a long time to introduce all of the 23 teacher-of-the-year candidates from each school. During the introduction of each candidate, a lot of nice things were said about each of them, most of which were testimonials from their students. The testimonials predictably gushed about their teacher’s role in helping them in a personal way. Now, don’t get me wrong, I think this is commendable. I am not against teachers being good role models and mentoring students on how to cope with life. But isn’t the primary and essential purpose of a school to drill the kids on academics? And while the student testimonials were meant to be complimentary, I’ll bet that none of the educators in that room realized what an indictment it was of their school system. The most common theme heard was something like, “She makes us feel so special,” or “He makes class time fun,” or “We can tell that she loves each one of us.” Not once during the painfully long two hours did I hear what I would have expected to hear about a Teacher-of-the-Year, i.e. maybe something about student academic achievement! Things like, “His students scored way higher than the district average on standardized tests,” or “Her students’ grade averages improved dramatically over the previous year.” Not once did I hear anything remotely like that. Are you surprised that teachers consider a kid’s feelings more important than what they learn? Were you naïve enough to really think that imparting knowledge was the foremost goal of our school system? All the evidence says it isn’t. Given that, it follows that the primary goal of our educational system is not to impart factual information, but to give kids a big educational hug so that we can all just live happily ever after in the educators’ view of a utopian society. Have we gotten too touchy-feely with the current generation of students because schools put less emphasis on academics and more on personal development of the child’s character? A well-known mantra among educators is that students won’t remember what you taught them, but will always remember how you made them feel while you were teaching it. With the increasing emphasis on personal interaction, is it any wonder we’re seeing more student-teacher affairs? It was unheard of when I went to school. I clearly remember the most influential and inspiring teacher I ever had. We never had a close personal relationship, but he still inspired my thirst for knowledge – a thirst that remains to this day. I never looked to him to make me a better person, because that was my parents’ job, not his. Today, it seems the academics have taken a back seat to social engineering.

This is why an increasingly large part of each student’s day is being consumed by politically correct indoctrination, and not true academics. If schools were indeed devoted to rigorous academic training preparing students for careers, instead of providing a fantasy mini-society where they can engage in all sorts of juvenile behavior without consequences, there wouldn’t be time for kids to be brainwashed with feel-good programs, multiculturalism, sexual orientation training, or pseudoscience classes. Schools need to be devoted to academics, period. Employers will tell you that most of the current crop of high school graduates do not even have the minimum skills necessary to enter the work force, which is why many employers have taken it upon themselves to train them on their own. As further proof of the dwindling role of academics, just observe how often your child’s school has “field trips” loosely disguised as learning opportunities. Yes, I realize that they can learn about marine life at Sea World, but ask any teacher or student making that field trip if that’s the portion of the trip that they were honestly anticipating. An honest teacher or student will tell you that they’re happy that it’s a day off school. Now you know why we graduate students who feel good about themselves, but finish next to last on standardized tests among industrialized nations.

1 posted on 05/21/2012 5:27:23 AM PDT by Guido2012
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To: Guido2012

My three children received excellent academic educations in public school.

We live in Texas. Much less of the union crap than in other states.

Please remember that every situation is unique. There are good schools and bad schools, good teachers and bad teachers. It’s wrong to throw them all in the same pot.

Does our public education system need improvement? Of course. Always.

But our society needs it more. As a parent who watched first-hand while our children were there, public schools carry a terrible burden trying to teach kids who can’t learn and don’t really want to because they carry the hubris of our world.

And their parents don’t care.


2 posted on 05/21/2012 5:43:53 AM PDT by Jedidah ("In those days Israel had no king. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: Jedidah

Drink some more of that Kool-Aide YOU SAP!


3 posted on 05/21/2012 5:51:24 AM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: Jedidah
Some are good, but not enough. The problem is too many families are forced to endure garbage while supporters point to a small number of successes.

We homeschooled our sons and would never dream of sending a child to a public school.

Both are done now with one just graduated with an Economics degree, and the younger just entering college at 16. Neither ever swore, talked backed, or ever disbehaved. Yes, its because they were not 'socialized' like other children in public schools.
4 posted on 05/21/2012 5:51:44 AM PDT by jps098
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To: Jedidah
Some are good, but not enough. The problem is too many families are forced to endure garbage while supporters point to a small number of successes.

We homeschooled our sons and would never dream of sending a child to a public school.

Both are done now with one just graduated with an Economics degree, and the younger just entering college at 16. Neither ever swore, talked backed, or ever disbehaved. Yes, its because they were not 'socialized' like other children in public schools.
5 posted on 05/21/2012 5:52:00 AM PDT by jps098
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To: Jedidah
Some are good, but not enough. The problem is too many families are forced to endure garbage while supporters point to a small number of successes.

We homeschooled our sons and would never dream of sending a child to a public school.

Both are done now with one just graduated with an Economics degree, and the younger just entering college at 16. Neither ever swore, talked backed, or ever disbehaved. Yes, its because they were not 'socialized' like other children in public schools.
6 posted on 05/21/2012 5:53:02 AM PDT by jps098
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To: Guido2012

Hell, I still remember foaming at the TV when Clintons “Education” administrator/czar said that self-actualization of the teachers trumped educating the kids.


7 posted on 05/21/2012 5:55:22 AM PDT by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: US Navy Vet

You been out to sea too long, bubba. While you were away, I was rearing a family and daily involved with their schools. You stick to boat business, I’ll speak of what I know.

Hope you get some help with the anger issues.


8 posted on 05/21/2012 6:00:00 AM PDT by Jedidah ("In those days Israel had no king. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: Jedidah

Vouchers.


9 posted on 05/21/2012 6:00:29 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: Jedidah
As a parent who watched first-hand while our children were there, public schools carry a terrible burden trying to teach kids who can’t learn and don’t really want to because they carry the hubris of our world. And their parents don’t care.

Therein lies a powerful argument against public schools. Very few people will EVER care about the quality of a product that they do directly pay for. Because their parents do not care, the children do not either. As you point out, this is a huge burden on the few parents who do. (see Milton Friedman's four way to spend money)

Parents must pay directly for their children's education - public funding must end. Single payer doesn't work.

10 posted on 05/21/2012 6:05:50 AM PDT by ALPAPilot
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...

The problem here isn’t learning vs feel-good, it’s handing out awards instead of recognizing ability in most of the teachers while getting rid of those who don’t have it. Thanks Guido2012.


11 posted on 05/21/2012 6:14:39 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Jedidah

My children were in the public system in Texas as well — one of the exemplary districts. I spent summers filling in the gaps of their education — things like knowing states and capitals, as they were never made to memorize them. Both of my kids were bored to tears — but I know that many parents were perfectly happy in the system.

Beyond the absence of challenging curricula, I was also irritated by the lack of accountability for student behavior, lack of accountability for rotten teacher behavior, and over-emotional schtick in the classroom. I was taken aback to hear my child’s teacher tell the class how much she ‘loves’ them. No, you don’t. You care for your class, but when they walk out of there at the end of the year, they don’t hear from you again. That’s not love. It’s a lie to say that, and it’s ridiculous. In addition, kids were not allowed to say — no, I don’t want to play with you on the playground. Sorry, teachers, but there is still freedom of association in this country, and if my child does not want to play with the class paste-eater, that’s the way it is.

Yes, there are problems outside the schools — lots of parents demanding things that have zip to do with academia. Parents are expecting schools to raise their children rather than educate them. There are children who have zero support at home to help with homework and they drag the class down, because heaven forbid schools should ‘level’ students according to ability. Someone’s feelings might get hurt. And then there are the kids who barely speak English — how do you teach a child who has no idea what is being said?

In short: if your children received an excellent academic education in Texas public schools — I think that’s wonderful. But I also imagine that your definition of excellent and mine are wholly different. We pulled our kids from the public system; my 10 year old has almost completed pre-Algebra with 96%, and my 14 year old is wrapping up Algebra 2 (he is scoring in the upper 90%’s as well). It’s looking like he’ll be finished with high school at 16. If we were still in the system, they wouldn’t be excelling as they are — they’d have been held back and forced to a mold, and force-fed state emotional/societal crap like what to do if you get in a car with a drunk driver (this was a program my daughter was made to attend in 2nd grade), counseling propaganda about ‘bullying’ (while the school completely ignores actual bullying when presented evidence). Much happier out of that ‘exemplary’ system. Not sure what it was supposed to have been an example of — but to me, it was an example of all that’s wrong with American schools.


12 posted on 05/21/2012 6:15:14 AM PDT by HGSW0904
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To: Jedidah

I’m with you. There are a lot of terrible schools out there, places that no decent parent would send a child if they understood what was happening, but there are also a lot of great schools. My kids have gone to excellent public schools (and several are still in those good schools), where the focus is on academics, and the quality of the academics is exemplary. Those schools exist, and even in average schools, there are GT classes that provide a real academic education. Thanks for standing up for the truth.

I think of these discussions much like discussion of how safe it is to walk the streets in town. I agree with those in Baltimore, DC, the Bronx, Chicago, Detroit, and East LA who say the streets are dangerous, and I agree with those in smaller towns who say the streets are safe. The mistake is in generalizing from the streets/schools in my neighborhood, yours, or an anti-school/anti-ubran poster’s neighborhood to all the streets/schools. We are all at least mostly right for the streets/schools where we live.


13 posted on 05/21/2012 6:19:06 AM PDT by Pollster1 (“A boy becomes a man when a man is needed.” - John Steinbeck)
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To: Guido2012

If you really want an eye opener send your kid to school with a digital recorder for a week.


14 posted on 05/21/2012 6:35:59 AM PDT by albionin (A gawn fit's eye gettin.)
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To: Jedidah

“My three children received excellent academic educations in public school.”

I would be very surprised if it’s as good as you think. And I can almost guarantee you they are subjected to near non-stop subtle, and not so, far left, PC, multicultural, ideological indoctrination throughout the school day. Maybe that mirrors your own beliefs but if it doesn’t you need to be concerned.

I taught in a FL middle school for one year as part of a “change in career” program they had set up to lure teachers in from other careers. It was far worse than I had ever expected. Students at education departments around the country routinely score at the bottom on college level standardized tests and it shows in school break rooms. For the most part the teachers teaching your kids became teachers because it was the only college course of study they could complete. It’s no surprise they endorse all the garbage of the left, they’re not smart enough to see through it. My personal belief is sending a child to public school amounts to child abuse. You are, of course, entitled to your opinion.


15 posted on 05/21/2012 6:41:07 AM PDT by MtBaldy (If Obama is the answer, it must have been a really stupid question)
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To: Jedidah

http://www.salisburypost.com/News/051912-North-teacher-on-video-qcd

Read this then click on the video link at the bottom of the article.

The incompetency and ignorance of this teacher is unbelievable.


16 posted on 05/21/2012 6:42:14 AM PDT by Dudoight
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To: Guido2012
Mr Caruso now supports choice.I don't see this as a solution.

Vouchers,tax credits,charter schools,distance learning. All simply rearrange the deck chairs on the sinking ship of federally controlled government education.

Homeschool using a 'carefully ' chosen curriculum would seem to be the best option. Next best , a private school that takes no federal funding, if you can find one.

17 posted on 05/21/2012 6:51:01 AM PDT by codder too
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To: Jedidah

I see the St. Louis Public schools, a model for urban districts, run like a jobs program. Let’s face it, black kids go in eager to learn at 6 years old and face teachers who believe they cannot learn, cannot keep up and need special consideration. This lowered expectation is what they live up to until at 15 they decide they can learn more from the street or from their own baby, and they drop out. Since our child labor laws will not allow them to work with their hands they turn to the work available in their community. Know what that’s likely to be?


18 posted on 05/21/2012 6:54:16 AM PDT by steve8714 (Who didn't already know Obama was our first gay President?)
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To: Pollster1

Your schools may be good where you live but the ones here stink. Even the gifted program here is just average. I had to pull my kids out of public school. My son was falling behind even with 4-5 hour of help after school. My daughter was in the gifted program and was bored to death because she was forced to read books she had read 2 years earlier. The teacher was just plain mean to her. The other students didn’t like her because she was so far ahead of them.

I figured if I had to work with them for 4-5 hours on my own time we might as well teach them on our own. It burns me up that 75% of my property taxes go to these crappy schools and I can do nothing about it.

My son is now ahead of public school and catching his older sister. My daughter is struggling now because she was not challenged in public school and finds it harder to focus now. She is still ahead of public school by far but it takes more effort to learn then just to sit in a gifted class where you are not challenged. Even so she will get through calculus and organic chemistry by the time she graduates. Not sure what my son will get to yet he has not expressed his interest yet.

My kids would have been left behind and not achieved what they could have in our local public schools because they no longer care what they teach only how the kids feel. If you have good schools count yourself lucky. Our local schools are said to be good that is until you look at what they are teaching.


19 posted on 05/21/2012 6:55:58 AM PDT by jimpick
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To: codder too

“My children were in the public system in Texas as well — one of the exemplary districts. I spent summers filling in the gaps of their education — things like knowing states and capitals, as they were never made to memorize them. Both of my kids were bored to tears — but I know that many parents were perfectly happy in the system.”

Doesn’t sound very exemplary to me. I teach history and that’s one of the things that I teach... I draw a blank map and I get the kids to label each state with the name and the shorthand (WY, ND, etc).

We go over all the M’s and all the I’s.


20 posted on 05/21/2012 6:58:02 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge
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To: Guido2012

Public Schools focus is on liberal social engineering.

The basic skills necessary to prepare for a productive career, are absent.


21 posted on 05/21/2012 7:10:28 AM PDT by G Larry (Criminals thrive on the indulgence of society's understanding)
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To: MtBaldy

“For the most part the teachers teaching your kids became teachers because it was the only college course of study they could complete.”

I chose to teach. Not all of us. Of course, I refuse to join the teachers union, and that makes life substantially more difficult, but I do get to teach a decent curriculum at a wonderful school.


22 posted on 05/21/2012 7:19:47 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge
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To: Guido2012

I used to live in Montgomery County,MD,supposedly one of the “best” school systems in the nation. I was talking with a young man who I worked with who had grown up in the county, and asked him some questions like “When was the Civil War?,”
“who was president during that war?,” “When was WW II?,” name one amendment to the Constitution,” and he was clueless. I was astounded, since these were common knowledge for me since I was a boy. Some years ago, the county implemented a sex ed curriculum that included information on homosexuality and promoted it as a normal lifestyle. A group of parents took the school district to court for the right to allow their children to opt out and go to the library during that class. A judge ruled that the right of the state to educate children took precedence over the wishes of the parents. That is chilling!


23 posted on 05/21/2012 7:21:43 AM PDT by Freestate316
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To: Jedidah

Excellent educations in Texas? What schools were those, pray?

You should realize that this is a typical rationalization provided by government education welfare queens.


24 posted on 05/21/2012 7:29:46 AM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: Jedidah
And their parents don’t care.

There it is. It all boils down to parental involvement. If a school doesn't have parents staying on top of things, the kids are doomed.

25 posted on 05/21/2012 8:07:31 AM PDT by bgill
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To: Jedidah

This is what I think of your school system - defund it. Let the families of Texas pay for their own kids’ education. That is how you improve it - no money for teachers or infrastructure.


26 posted on 05/21/2012 8:08:54 AM PDT by impimp
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To: US Navy Vet

Ignorance is bliss.


27 posted on 05/21/2012 8:32:43 AM PDT by A Strict Constructionist (We're an Oligrachy...Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: impimp

“This is what I think of your school system - defund it. Let the families of Texas pay for their own kids’ education. That is how you improve it - no money for teachers or infrastructure.”

Exactly, that’s how we put man on the moon and won WWII.


28 posted on 05/21/2012 8:35:39 AM PDT by A Strict Constructionist (We're an Oligrachy...Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Guido2012

My Son is in a private, Christian school. He quit the basketball team (the coach was more concerned with advancing himself then teaching the kids) and the math teacher took it out on him. She was the basketball coach’s daughter. People are just bags of emotions walking around.


29 posted on 05/21/2012 8:47:33 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: bgill

“””There it is. It all boils down to parental involvement. If a school doesn’t have parents staying on top of things, the kids are doomed.””

This is not entirely true. We spent a lot of time trying to make the curriculum the public school had work. In the end we had to pull our kids out to get some decent curriculum to teach them with. Our involvement in our public school had no effect in getting our kids to learn. We talked to the teachers daily and still they were falling behind.

Parent involvement in public school is not the only thing that will ensure that your kid succeed or not. I will agree that it is very important to have parental involvement but it is not the only thing holding kids back.


30 posted on 05/21/2012 8:54:58 AM PDT by jimpick
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To: A Strict Constructionist

Are you saying that America was a horses a55 prior to the end of the 19th century when public school became widespread?

Public education promotes godlessness. I am not OK with that. Ask yourself what would happen without public education. I’ll tell you - religious education would fill the vacuum, as would homeschooling.


31 posted on 05/21/2012 9:34:30 AM PDT by impimp
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To: A Strict Constructionist

Are you saying that America was a horses a55 prior to the end of the 19th century when public school became widespread?

Public education promotes godlessness. I am not OK with that. Ask yourself what would happen without public education. I’ll tell you - religious education would fill the vacuum, as would homeschooling.


32 posted on 05/21/2012 9:35:02 AM PDT by impimp
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To: impimp

“Public education promotes godlessness.”

That’s just like saying a good Catholic education promotes child molestation, get real.

Did you happen to teach at Ganus in New Orleans? I remember my daughters teacher told her and a friend that they would end up pregnant if they left and went to Ben Franklin with the rest of the nerds. Funny but the no one in her class at BF ended up pregnant, in a much larger class. Several of her former classmates including one of the preachers kids who was the minister of the school founders family and of the above mentioned teacher ended up pregnant. Don’t come back with the abortion argument it would apply to both schools.

I’ve learned that you get what you pay for from a parochial education. Pay more get more and you don’t have to put up with any disruptions because they kick them out so that the public schools have to deal with them. Religious affiliation doesn’t matter you’re equally gone. It is amazing that religious principle’s don’t always apply when it comes to catering to the richer members of the community.


33 posted on 05/21/2012 9:55:25 AM PDT by A Strict Constructionist (We're an Oligrachy...Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: MtBaldy

Well, it was good enough to earn them all four-year academic scholarships to a Tier 1 research university, where they have excelled in engineering.

And they’re committed conservative voters, to boot.


34 posted on 05/21/2012 11:54:41 AM PDT by Jedidah ("In those days Israel had no king. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: achilles2000

Sweetie, this FReeper has, without being on the public dole, encouraged three kids through public school, seen them excel in college, and now become responsible taxpayers and voters.

Not bad for a “welfare queen,” huh?

It’s discouraging sometimes to realize how bombastic and ignorant some FReepers are. You simply don’t know what you’re talking about.


35 posted on 05/21/2012 11:58:23 AM PDT by Jedidah ("In those days Israel had no king. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: HGSW0904

No, sir, my definition of excellent is excellent. Like National Merit excellent, OK? Like top-of-the-class multiple scholarship excellent. Like nearing six figures upon college graduation excellent.

I could not have taught the tough curricula my kids took in high school, but they had excellent teachers who could and did, with my support all they way.

And I honor them for it.

There are terrible teachers and there are terrible schools, and there are terrible doctors and great ones, and terrible lawyers and great ones, etc. etc. It’s a mistake to use a broad brush to tar and feather the good with the bad, and that’s what many on this board want to do.


36 posted on 05/21/2012 12:06:24 PM PDT by Jedidah ("In those days Israel had no king. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: Jedidah

Government school welfare queen. One step away from EBT.


37 posted on 05/21/2012 12:17:37 PM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: Pollster1

My experience with GT was good in GA but poor in NC.


38 posted on 05/21/2012 12:46:55 PM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: Jedidah

Then it would seem your definition of excellent and mine are pretty similar. Good for you and for your kids! I’m glad to hear something positive coming from public education. My niece (also public school educated) informed me recently that when she took the ACT, about half of the students didn’t know how to sign their names in cursive. So to hear a success story is refreshing. I’m guessing there was good support at your home, which can make a great deal of difference. I think most parents are completely tuned out to what goes on at school, and the school issues are far more complicated than just bad teachers. Red tape, political correctness, overwhelmed faculty, absent parents, illegal immigrants straining the system, and, yes, radical teachers imposing an agenda all contribute to a system that needs some serious help.


39 posted on 05/21/2012 2:57:04 PM PDT by HGSW0904
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To: Jedidah

Well, then they escaped the indoctrination and you did good.


40 posted on 05/21/2012 4:18:53 PM PDT by MtBaldy (If Obama is the answer, it must have been a really stupid question)
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To: codder too

School choice does allow parents to choose a private school that doesn’t accept government funding as well as homeschooling. The point is that real school choice means giving us our tax money back so we can use it to choose.


41 posted on 05/21/2012 4:36:33 PM PDT by Guido2012
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To: Guido2012

The unfortunate thing is that as soon as you present those tax dollars to the private institution, you compromise their ‘private-independent’status. Tax dollars, no matter what they are called are toxic and controlling. The progressive agenda can be alluring and deceptive. Choose very carefully.


42 posted on 05/21/2012 6:01:28 PM PDT by codder too
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To: 1010RD

Leftist gubmint unionistas are afraid that given the choice, parents will send their kids to schools that instill
the values they have at home. (or at least not directly undermine them)

That might not include: Earth worship ,worshipping The State and gay “marriage”.


43 posted on 05/24/2012 8:08:36 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
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To: Guido2012

Anymore? Really?

American compulsory government schooling was imported from Bismark’s Germany. It’s always been about Statism.

Read the truth for free:
http://johntaylorgatto.com/underground/


44 posted on 05/24/2012 8:21:00 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
American compulsory government schooling was imported from Bismark’s Germany. It’s always been about Statism.

And to pile on, free government education is straight out of Marx's Communist Manifesto. I'm sure there are some good quality public schools and teachers, but I'll wager they are more the exception than the rule.

45 posted on 05/24/2012 8:29:45 AM PDT by Marathoner (If the election was Obama vs. Satan I'd have to flip a coin.)
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To: Jedidah
"Does our public education system need improvement? Of course. Always. But our society needs it more."

We will defend your right to put your children in tax-supported government schools.

We want to maintain our right (and have the same government be responsible to secure our right) to NOT have our in any government-run school.

Here in Indiana, one of the most conservative of the Midwest states, academics be they good or bad, we see with our own eyes what gets off the big yellow indoctrination center wagon (a school bus) every afternoon right on our corner, less than 75 feet from our front door.

No thanks. We will help "improve" our society by NOT making those places a daily source of influences for 6 to 8 hours for our children.

Home schooling now for 31 years now, we shall continue.

46 posted on 05/24/2012 8:39:08 AM PDT by John Leland 1789
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To: Guido2012

Your critique of government schooling is superficial.

This is what schools teach:
http://www.newciv.org/whole/schoolteacher.txt

Private schools are often as guilty.

To say that schooling should only focus on academics is... deplorable.

Why? Because the purpose of life itself is to know, love, and serve God in,this life, and to be happy forever with Him in the next.

Compulsory formal education, that occupies a child’s entire day, and which ignores this end, is abusive.

This natural right of children (the freedom to choose a form of education that serves this natural end) cannot be achieved under our current schooling system. Parents, as the natural primary educators of children, must be free to choose what they regard to be the best form of education for their children.

Vouchers, or the complete disestablishment of schooling, would be just systems for the furthering of formal education.


47 posted on 05/24/2012 8:42:00 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: codder too

Those “tax dollars” are our money. The government took it from us or they wouldn’t have any to give. They should let us keep it in the first place so we can choose how to spend it ourselves on whatever school we decide to send our kids.


48 posted on 05/24/2012 9:46:00 AM PDT by Guido2012
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