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Vanishing Americans (St. Louis Chapter)
The Thinking Housewife ^ | May 25, 2012 | Laura Wood

Posted on 05/28/2012 8:29:54 AM PDT by Pelham

ALAN writes:

"On a recent Sunday afternoon, I had the most incredible experience: I sat in a roomful of 50 men and women who had lunch, talked, reminisced, and enjoyed themselves for four hours. The incredible part was that they did all that without cell phones, without liquor, without vulgar language, without loud “music,” without blaring TV screens, and without wrecking the place. All of them are white. All of them are decent and disciplined. They are, therefore, atypical 21st-century Americans. They grew up in the 1930s, ‘40s, and ‘50s. They are Old School. They are not “cool” or trendy; if they were, I would have known I had walked into the wrong room.

The occasion was a reunion of people who attended schools in the neighborhood in south St. Louis where my father lived as a boy. He organized the first such reunion in 1988. One man was so grateful for the reunions that he sent my father a four-page handwritten letter describing his memories of schoolmates in the 1920s.

This year’s event, the 25th annual reunion was the last – because the people who do the most work are tired and beset with health concerns, and because younger people have no interest in such reunions.

All of those people grew up in two old, adjacent, working-class neighborhoods that were largely self-sufficient: Grocery stores, bakeries, meat markets, confectionaries, drug stores, a farmer’s market, clothing stores, hat shops, jewelry stores, medical and dental offices, barber shops, beauty shops, hardware stores, corner taverns, city parks, a swimming pool, a library, churches, schools, movie theatres, and places of employment all stood within those neighborhoods. Virtually everything they needed could be found within walking distance from where they lived. Everyone walked everywhere.

It was an area of cold-water flats and breadboxes in front of corner markets; of railroad tracks and factories near the Mississippi River; where shop-owners lived above their shops; where saloon-keepers bounced customers who used vulgar language; and where families went window-shopping on Saturday nights along a street lined with stores. Many of them did not own an automobile or a telephone.

In contrast, many modern Americans are awash in excess and have little moral fiber. The people at the reunion did it the other way around: Excess was never a part of their lives, but they had moral fiber in abundance. None of them lived on Easy Street. Many of them were poor in material comforts. But they were not poor in things that matter: Imagination, self-discipline, common sense, self-reliance, loyalty to their families, schools, churches, and neighborhood, and a determination to pull their own weight. “It was customary not to ask for help. You stood or fell on your own,” wrote Betty Pavlige in her book Growing Up In Soulard (1980, pp. 24-25). She grew up there in the 1920s-‘30s and then operated a beauty shop there for 49 years.

There was no moral relativism in their lives. Because many of them were poor, medical care was often beyond their reach, and injuries and death were no strangers to them. “The stern facts of life had strong influence on our moral standards and the code of ethics that we lived by – or violated with terrible feelings of risk,” she wrote. “Dependability was a high virtue, and we regarded a lie, even a little white lie, as one of the serious offenses. …The lie even became a kind of allegory of death, because it submerged truth, covered it over and contaminated it. This was taught in our homes, and it was reinforced by consensus among the children wherever we gathered to play – the schoolyard, the streets, the river.” (p. 89)

They learned early in life to appreciate simple pleasures: “We believed that one step below heaven on a hot summer day was to have the 5 cents to put in the Coca-Cola machine and bring out that small frosty bottle…” (p. 93)

For heat in the winter, they burned coal. For air-conditioning in the summer, they opened the windows.

For entertainment on weekends, they walked a few blocks to watch boat and barge traffic on the river, or played softball or baseball on vacant corner lots, or walked to any of three unpretentious movie houses to enjoy the B-Westerns of Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, or Hopalong Cassidy, or listened every Saturday evening to radio’s “Your Hit Parade”.

They were not perfect, but they had enough sense to uphold form, proportion, perspective, balance, and hierarchy in their lives – which is considerably more sense than many Americans have today.

My Aunt Helen attended a public school there a hundred years ago. Her 8th-grade graduation photo from 1915 shows her in a white dress with a serrated hem well below the knee, a string of pearls, white dress shoes, and a white ribbon in her hair. In one hand she holds a “Certificate of Scholarship.” Try to imagine that degree of refinement in any public school ceremony today. In that picture, she projects more dignity at age 14 than many women do today at age 30 or 40. In the 1920s, she worked as an elevator operator in a handsome office building in the heart of downtown St. Louis that has now stood abandoned and deteriorating for two decades.

I spoke with a lady at the reunion who graduated from a parochial school in 1949. She has wonderful memories of that parish and its beautiful, German Gothic church. But she told me it has been thoroughly modernized: All the pews were taken out and replaced with seating “in the round”, and services are now in English, not Latin, and include hand-clapping. She did not think favorably of those changes. I could only agree.

Attachment to a particular place is something many modern Americans will never feel or understand. But these people understood it well, half a century after they moved away when large portions of that neighborhood were demolished. My father understood it: Never lured by the modern rat race, he was content to live for 73 years within five blocks from where his boyhood home had stood. Photos from that old neighborhood were displayed at the reunion, along with class graduation pictures from the 1950s. The dress and demeanor of boys and girls in those pictures are a moral universe removed from – and better than – what is seen in schools today.

It was a bittersweet afternoon for me. I knew I was in a roomful of the best kind of men and women: Hard-working, reliable, down-to-earth, plain-spoken, straight-shooting men and women who never expected or asked for any special favors from anyone, and who never imagined that anyone owed them anything. And I knew that their code of moral standards and self-discipline are fast disappearing from the American landscape. Such people are a glorious contrast to the pampered, overeducated, miseducated, and ill-mannered people we see so often today. The difference is that they were teenagers once but got over it and grew up – whereas modern Americans prefer to remain teenagers.

In 1997, the Reunion Committee gave my father a certificate of appreciation to express gratitude to him for his work in organizing the early school reunions.

In 2012, I gave each member of that Committee a certificate of appreciation to express my gratitude to them for their labor of love in continuing those annual reunions for a quarter-century.

I knew that this last reunion marked the end of an era for those good people. It was an honor to sit among them.


TOPICS: History; Society
KEYWORDS: laurawood; socialcons; stlouis; thethinkinghousewife; traditionalism; vanishedamerica

1 posted on 05/28/2012 8:29:59 AM PDT by Pelham
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To: Kenny Bunk; wardaddy

See if you remember Americans like this.


2 posted on 05/28/2012 8:31:51 AM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: Pelham

Thank you. I went to my 50 year high school reunion in
1983. That was the last one , not enough of us left now.
Today I plan to go up on top of the hill where the Memorial Service will be held at the cemetary in this small town.
There are lots of very fine young people in this town and I feel confident that they will carry on just fine when our generattion is gone.


3 posted on 05/28/2012 8:58:15 AM PDT by tommix2 (,)
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To: Pelham

I am 64 yrs old. America was like this prior to the 60’s ‘counter culture.’ It was a different world from today.


4 posted on 05/28/2012 9:23:03 AM PDT by Conservative4Ever (Waiting for the new tagline to download)
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To: Conservative4Ever

I miss my country.


5 posted on 05/28/2012 9:25:57 AM PDT by satan (Plumbing new depths of worthlessness on a daily basis.)
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To: satan
That statement brought tears to my eyes. Must be because of this holiday, I'm feeling sentimental. I miss it too.
6 posted on 05/28/2012 9:29:17 AM PDT by Conservative4Ever (Waiting for the new tagline to download)
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To: tommix2
Wow tommix! You must be one of the oldest FReepers.

Now I know why you chose your name. Very cool BTW.

7 posted on 05/28/2012 9:55:06 AM PDT by boop (I hate hippies and dopeheads. Just hate them. ...Ernest Borgnine)
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To: Pelham; EternalVigilance
This reminiscence is of an America which has always been and always will be an enemy of Obama and Romney, neither of whom begin to understand that America nor wish to understand it. The people described were a Catholic subset of a generation inspired by the Greatest Generation who were their parents.

Wars were WON UNCONDITIONALLY rather than abandoned, drawn out or negotiated. You knew your neighbors and cared about them and their kids. Families were large. Divorce and adultery were shameful. Labor unions were generally private sector and patriotic. Same sex anything was unheard of and rightfully so. Criminal misbehavior was regarded as disgraceful. Eve FDR called welfare a strictly temporary expedient and NOT a way of life.

It was a truly golden era in our nation's history and it ought to be restored.

8 posted on 05/28/2012 10:45:19 AM PDT by BlackElk (Viva Cristo Rey! Tom Hoefling for POTUS! Viva Cristo Rey!)
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To: boop
one of the oldest FReepersYour post reminded me to take a second look at what I wrote. Should be 1993 not 1983 So sorry. I'm only 85
9 posted on 05/28/2012 11:12:50 AM PDT by tommix2 (,)
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To: tommix2

There really was a greater infusion of moral values into young minds then than now, and the resultant early maturity showed in youthful faces. I found my MIL’s high school graduation portrait, class of 1942. She was a lovely young woman of eighteen, nothing girlish or immature about her at all, already an adult ready for real life. She went on to teach school at high school then college level for more than six decades.

In fact, more mature at that age than today’s thirtysomethings.


10 posted on 05/28/2012 11:38:07 AM PDT by elcid1970 (Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: Conservative4Ever
I am 64 yrs old. America was like this prior to the 60’s ‘counter culture.’ It was a different world from today.

Counter culture had nothing to do with it, forced integration did.

Communities, and neighborhoods were instantly destroyed.

Suddenly crime and the resulting security concerns erased the casual days of permanently unlocked doors, big open windows, and keys almost never leaving the ignition of the unlocked cars.

A flood of third world immigration created by JFK/Ted/Johnson and the Democrat party fed that destruction and finished us off.

11 posted on 05/28/2012 12:52:11 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors,,, where the GOP goes for it's "conservative" Presidential candidates.)
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To: BlackElk
Unfortunately that generation you praise, is what destroyed us.

The 1965 Immigration Act was the end of America, it cannot be undone, this is not just an historical cycle that can eventually be undone, this is permanent and is going to get worse.

By the way, when you used Catholic, you didn't mean Catholic voters did you?

12 posted on 05/28/2012 12:59:07 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's conservative Presidential candidates.)
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To: ansel12; BlackElk

“Unfortunately that generation you praise, is what destroyed us”

I don’t think I’d agree with that. Members of that generation that I knew, and still know in their 90s for that matter, didn’t support those changes. But they didn’t have the ability to control social and political changes any more than we do now. Politicians betrayed their constituents just like they do today.

The ones who did the damage were a small subculture that harbors a grudge against traditional America. A lot of them worked for Ted Kennedy and wrote the bills that that fool put his name on.


13 posted on 05/28/2012 1:14:05 PM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: Pelham

They knew what they were doing, the Warren Court, the radical Congress and Senate, JFK and LBJ, the 1964 election was a 61% to 38% statement on that generation.

“However, if there is one man who can take the most credit for the 1965 act, it is John F. Kennedy. Kennedy seems to have inherited the resentment his father Joseph felt as an outsider in Boston’s WASP aristocracy. He voted against the McCarran-Walter Act of 1952, and supported various refugee acts throughout the 1950s. In 1958 he wrote a book, A Nation of Immigrants, which attacked the quota system as illogical and without purpose, and the book served as Kennedy’s blueprint for immigration reform after he became president in 1960. In the summer of 1963, Kennedy sent Congress a proposal calling for the elimination of the national origins quota system. He wanted immigrants admitted on the basis of family reunification and needed skills, without regard to national origin. After his assassination in November, his brother Robert took up the cause of immigration reform, calling it JFK’s legacy. In the forward to a revised edition of A Nation of Immigrants, issued in 1964 to gain support for the new law, he wrote, “I know of no cause which President Kennedy championed more warmly than the improvement of our immigration policies.” Sold as a memorial to JFK, there was very little opposition to what became known as the Immigration Act of 1965.”


14 posted on 05/28/2012 1:29:43 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's conservative Presidential candidates.)
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To: BlackElk
Wars were WON UNCONDITIONALLY rather than abandoned, drawn out or negotiated.

Until the young military aged WWII generation returned and started running the wars and the government for the next 40 years.

They were a disaster as leaders.

15 posted on 05/28/2012 1:37:00 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's conservative Presidential candidates.)
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To: ansel12

“They knew what they were doing, the Warren Court,”

Eisenhower said that the two biggest mistakes he made as President were nominating Earl Warren and William Brennan to the Supreme Court. Not exactly a ringing endorsement for the theory that the Warren Court was intended by Ike’s generation. Calls for Warren’s impeachment were common and weren’t restricted to fringe groups.

“the radical Congress and Senate,”

From 1936 to 1963 the conservative coalition of southern Democrats and conservative Republicans dominated the House and Senate. Only Lyndon Johnson with his inside knowledge of Congress was able to defeat them.

“the 1964 election was a 61% to 38% statement on that generation.”

That was hardly an endorsement of anything. The 1964 election was, as Goldwater predicted it would be, a sympathy vote for the dead JFK, assassinated one year earlier.

““However, if there is one man who can take the most credit for the 1965 act, it is John F. Kennedy.”

The destructive 1965 Immigration bill was passed in 1965; JFK was dead in November 1963.

“After his assassination in November, his brother Robert took up the cause of immigration reform, calling it JFK’s legacy”

Robert Kennedy became Senator from New York in 1965 and supported the immigration bill; but the bill was pushed mainly by Ted Kennedy who had occupied JFK’s old Senate seat from Massachusetts since 1962.


16 posted on 05/28/2012 2:33:43 PM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: ansel12; BlackElk

The first post-WWII non-victory war was Korea. It started during Truman’s administration, and that administration was a generation older than the WWII vets.


17 posted on 05/28/2012 2:45:08 PM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: Pelham

I wasn’t measuring it by who was President and the oldest of the political leadership, by the way WWII could be called the greatest stalemate of all, it was the resulting unfinished war with the German/Soviet alliance that led to decades of stalemate and defeats under weak leadership.

The fighters of WWII were already covering a wide range of ages by the early fifties, roughly age 23 to 45 let’s say, they were already having a heavy influence on leadership and politics. Vietnam and 1960s/1970s America was all theirs to run, and they ran it into the ground.


18 posted on 05/28/2012 3:01:53 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's Presidential candidates.)
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To: Pelham

I don’t want to have to explain every little detail, this is tedious.

The Warren court was not just Earl Warren and Brennan.

If you don’t think that Congress was radical from 1936 to 1963 then you are ignorant of what happened during those most deadly leftist years to America.

Calling the massive democratic vote of 1964 sympathy is naive, the left rolled the people by convincing them that liberalism was the wave of the future, it was fair and enlightened and the people ate it up, I remember that election.

We all know the difference between JFK dying in 1963, and the legislation passed in his name, fulfilling his dream in 1965,if Nixon had won, Kennedy’s dream to replace Americans with democrat voting foreigners would never had happened.


19 posted on 05/28/2012 3:14:54 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's Presidential candidates.)
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To: ansel12

“Vietnam and 1960s/1970s America was all theirs to run, and they ran it into the ground.”

Our Vietnam involvement began under Eisenhower in the early 50s, but Ike was opposed to getting into a ground war in Asia. Unfortunately his successors were too arrogant to heed the old General and they set disaster into motion. Kennedy managed to get the President of South Vietnam assassinated and Johnson inherited a mess that he made worse.

I often think that LBJ is the worst President of my lifetime. He set in motion domestic policies whose poison still afflicts the country. And he was aided in this by liberal Republicans, who helped him pass all the noble sounding civil rights bills that have had so many evil consequences for average Americans.

Nixon was no better. He had no interest in domestic policies and essentially continued those of Johnson, adding to them in fact. I’m sure many Republicans would be surprised to learn some of the agencies and laws that were created under Nixon, particularly in environmental law.


20 posted on 05/28/2012 3:29:46 PM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: Pelham

Vietnam happened because of JFK, not Eisenhower.

There was never a problem with having a few hundred advisers there, the Army had been involved in Southeast Asia since the 1940s.

It was the sudden build up to over 16,000 troops that got us in.

The election of JFK is what ended America. No JFK meant no Vietnam, no radical 1960s, no immigration, no multiculturalism and language chaos, not most of what we think of from the 1960s and 1970s.

JFK and LBJ are just two parts of the same monster.


21 posted on 05/28/2012 3:42:41 PM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's Presidential candidates.)
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To: ansel12

It’s certainly a waste of my time to attempt a discussion with someone convinced that he knows it all.

Good luck with your illusions.


22 posted on 05/28/2012 7:10:06 PM PDT by Pelham (Marco Rubio, so that we can be the capital of Latin America)
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To: ansel12
By "Catholic," I meant the specific people who were the subject of the article: alumni/alumnae of a Roman Catholic parochial school in St. Louis, Missouri who graduated more than fifty years ago. Conceding that they may well have had grandchildren who may stray to Evangelical Christianity from their Catholic roots (it's a free country), the likelihood of any in the generation in question so migrating is slim.

Note that what had been a very traditional parish had later become anything but. They now do novus ordo Masses in a church totally gutted from the beauty of yesteryear. The parish has become a Kumbaya pariah. That is what effectively destroyed them. Pews in a circle or semi-circle and hand clapping galore. Sensitivity abounds and discipline has faded badly.

You know, I suspect that you have never been Catholic. I do not doubt that you are reasonably disappointed in many of my co-religionists, maybe even in me, and that you are firm in your own faith whatever it may be. I am not comfortable worshiping in reformed churches and am firm in the Roman Catholic Faith. I know I am not going to change and you and many here are not likely to change either. For good or for ill, we are stuck with each other. Don't be such a pessimist. We really are not as bad as you imagine.

When I was growing up in the 1950s, virtually every member of my quite large extended family was a militant New Deal Democrat. The two exceptions were a millionaire great uncle and a first cousin who had served about 12 years active duty in the Marine Corps in the Korean War and then long enough to be on a troop ship heading for Cuba to back up the Bay of Pigs invasion (but his ship turned around and went back to Baltimore). Today, few if any of my relatives are other than determined Reagan style Republicans. Abortion and "gay" everything and pacifism and gun grabbing and other issues have converted my verrrry New Deal Democrat family to Reagan Republicans and they VOTE.

If you want to be upset with Catholics, be upset that our birth rate has declined as we have assimilated into America. I had a cousin in Boston (born in about 1860) whom I met at her 95th birthday party. She cooked corned beef and cabbage for the entire mob of 23 surviving children, their spouses, their kids, grandkids and me (who happened to be in town at about age ten) totaling about 250 people. An Irish family as God intended. My mother's Scottish-German sister had 10 kids by her Irish husband. I married late and had three kids. My relatives have not been as inclined to large families as their ancestors.

It was not just Catholics either. Nearly two weeks ago, a very holy priest died in a nursing facility in Traverse City, Michigan. He had been afflicted with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. He had been brought up in a Finnish Lutheran family and he was the sixteenth of eighteen children,the first ten having died in childbirth or infancy. He married an Irish Catholic woman whom he met in junior high school. She died in his presence in an automobile collision shortly after his military retirement. He had converted to Catholicism during a lengthy and distinguished military career. He became a "late vocation" priest against substantial odds. He was a client of mine and the bravest and most determined priest and pro-lifer I will ever know. You may remember him as the elderly priest arrested on the Notre Dame campus for carrying a cross in protest of Obozo speaking there at graduation. His name was Fr. Norman Weslin. If you knew him, you would have loved him as I did. He would have respected you for who you are and would not have let religious differences separate brethren in Christ.

The 1965 Immigration Act is undoubtedly flawed but is not the disaster you describe. Racial and nationality quotas are a national embarrassment. What we need to do is recruit among the new Americans. The culture here is going to change. It is not going to calcify in place. The good that was that parish in St. Louis is not harmed by immigration. The polo club or Junior League is more the enemy of Americans and their prosperous future than is Julio's Bar and Grill or a Vietnamese restaurant or a Korean small business.

Welcome Catholics to the ranks of conservatives. We are coming whether welcome or not and there are a lot of us. We disagree on about 5% of faith issues. Protestant conservatives are not going to win the culture wars without us and we are not going to win without Protestant consevatives. John Cardinal O'Connor could work it out with the Rev. Mr. Charles Colson and so can you and I.

Was Mother Teresa so bad? John Paul II? Is Timothy Cardinal Dolan a problem? Or 2 million Knights of Columbus? Let me just focus on John Paul II. How well do you know the story of his life? His participation in youth in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders of his country? His resistance to the soviet stooges running his country when he was Archbishop of Krakow? His role in bringing down the Iron Curtain in cooperation with Reagan and Thatcher. The attempted assassinations including that by Mehmet Ali Agca in Vatican Square, paid for by the KGB? You may not agree with Catholic theology in all respects but it should be hard not to have regard for John Paul II and his efforts in this world of yours and mine.

God bless you and yours!

23 posted on 05/29/2012 12:43:48 AM PDT by BlackElk (Viva Cristo Rey! Tom Hoefling for POTUS! Viva Cristo Rey!)
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To: BlackElk

Weird post to make in reply to post 12, unless you were thinking of some other poster, because little of your lengthy post was relevant to me.

You say that Catholics are going to be joining conservatives, and then you defend the 1965 Immigration Act, which ended America forever, it doomed us. That is a true contradiction claiming to want to win elections, but fighting to make sure that we never win, that we do not even preserve our culture and national identity with Western Civilization.

You should know that Catholics are not going to become conservatives, we may get another election or three where they may swing slightly, but they are headed back to the left permanently in the near future.

Why you want to pretend differently puzzles me. I don’t understand why even supposedly conservative Catholics refuse to look at the liberalism of the Catholic voter, and want more and more left wing empowering immigration, all the while insisting that they are conservatives.


24 posted on 05/29/2012 1:22:03 AM PDT by ansel12 (Massachusetts Governors, where the GOP now goes for it's Presidential candidates.)
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To: tommix2

I salute you.

I’m 30 years your junior and even i recall a much better world here in many ways once.

Medical advances are the major plus about the modern era...and if you’re where I am (Dixie)...Air Conditioning


25 posted on 05/29/2012 10:12:41 AM PDT by wardaddy (the GOP are cowards)
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To: ansel12

Even so, God bless you and yours anyway!


26 posted on 05/29/2012 3:03:19 PM PDT by BlackElk (Viva Cristo Rey! Tom Hoefling for POTUS! Viva Cristo Rey!)
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