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Old Country Store
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Posted on 08/05/2012 12:56:58 PM PDT by djone

Bologna came in a stick, 5" diameter by 30" long, when someone asked for a half pound of bologna the grocer put it up on the saw, asked "thick or thin?" and sliced, put them on the scale and wrapped it up in white butcher paper. The bologna ends however went home cause people felt slighted if you sold them anything less than a full slice........


TOPICS: Food
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A friend of mine spent some of his youth behind the counter of an old country store. It was a small store in a tiny town in west-most Virginia. Across the road from a creek at the old iron bridge you could hear a car coming as its tires rumbled on the wooden surface. Inside of the store was about a 8 X8 area for customers to stand as the walls were full of merchandise. The Grocer worked the graveyard shift at the mine then came home and opened the store until 6pm. Don’t know how he did it for years but he would tell you that he was living the good life. Most bought on "account". You signed the book for the items then paid at the end of the month. A few never did, but one women paid her brother's bills after he died. From her own pocket too, She said she didn't want one black sheep to soil the her family’s name.. how about that ? People didn't know that the grocer's family had to eat whatever didn't sell or was about to go bad, like wrinkled potatoes or vegetables with spots or that last box of "Alpha Bits" that didn't sell. Well you just wolfed it down anyway. Bologna came in a stick, 5" diameter by 30" long, when someone asked for a half pound of bologna the grocer put it up on the saw, asked "thick or thin?" and sliced, put them on the scale and wrapped it up in white butcher paper. The bologna ends however went home cause people felt slighted if you sold them anything less than a full slice. HA, the joke was on them, that was the best part . The half round end had more of the spices and so tasted better. Make a cut from the center to on edge on the radius, pop it in a iron frying pan until it was almost crispy, (Come to think about it ended up looking like a pacman) place on toast with lots of mayonnaise...maybe a slice of tomato……….****Woo Boy That’s A Good “Samich“*****

...Looked kind of like this

1 posted on 08/05/2012 12:57:06 PM PDT by djone
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To: djone

I sometimes think we need to go back to this simple way of life. People wwere damned glad to GET THE BOLOGNA back then and... I wonder how many even eat it today. It was good, delicious fried or natueral on a sandwich with fresh gardenlettuce, tomato, onion slices with mayo. OR...it was equally delicious with mustard, cheese, onion slices on ANY kind of bread.


2 posted on 08/05/2012 1:07:25 PM PDT by cubreporter
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To: djone
My grandfather's idea of a Balogna sandwich, his favorite, was two thick slices of Bologna with mayo in between. No bread or anything else. God rest his soul.
3 posted on 08/05/2012 1:09:25 PM PDT by fish hawk (Religion: Man's attempt to gain salvation or the approbation of God by his own works)
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To: djone

Never liked bologna unless it was fried...or grilled. Had to be crisp and crunchy.

Years ago, some friends and I spent a weekend at a cottage along the Allegheny River up in the mountains not far from Tionesta, PA. On the way, we stopped in at a general store. It had the best meats, including different kinds of bacon — honey cured, maple cured, you name it. The store also sold Amish baked goods. We’re talking huge pies loaded with filling, tall loaves of bread... Jars of preserves, apple butter, even homemade peanut butter. This was a foodie paradise. Everything was homemade and all natural.

Alas, the cottage was sold, and some of the friends moved away. I miss the cottage and that cool store.


4 posted on 08/05/2012 1:13:27 PM PDT by fatnotlazy
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To: fish hawk

A loaf o’ bread an’ a roll o’ red.


5 posted on 08/05/2012 1:14:24 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: cubreporter

Back in those days, everything tasted better because there weren’t all the additives we have today.


6 posted on 08/05/2012 1:19:01 PM PDT by Randy Larsen (Damned if I do, Damned if I don't. Damn it, I will!)
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To: djone
The bologna ends however went home cause people felt slighted if you sold them anything less than a full slice.

Not at the counter that I worked. The ends went in the grinder with the odds and ends of other processed meats to make the Bologna Salad.

7 posted on 08/05/2012 1:21:30 PM PDT by Pontiac (The welfare state must fail because it is contrary to human nature and diminishes the human spirit.)
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To: djone

Back in the late 60’s I was in a store like Octave Fontenot’s in rural Louisiana. A little old man in a white shirt and striped pants assisted by his early teen aged grand daughter. It was like a page from yesterday and seeing the photo reminded me.


8 posted on 08/05/2012 1:24:19 PM PDT by OldEagle
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To: djone

A lot of WWII veterans can never stand the sight of bologna, as the lowest grade of it was used to feed the troops at the giant training camps.

Some soldiers were in the habit of after eating breakfast, to just stand around the main entrance of the mess hall, knowing that the bologna would make them vomit on schedule, and they wanted to send a message to the staff.

Eventually, the Army decided to replace the bologna with an even cheaper meat: boxcars full of aging salmon on ice. At the time it was thought of as a “junk” fish, and this was really low grade stuff. But that was too much, and the troops near rioted in protest.

Ironically, many southern soldiers abhorred most any food other than grits, so had to be forced to eat other food, if for no other reason than to prevent Pellagra.


9 posted on 08/05/2012 1:26:33 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

“A lot of WWII veterans can never stand the sight of bologna, as the lowest grade of it was used to feed the troops at the giant training camps.”

***

Dad served in WWII, but he loved bologna. Like I said though, had to be fried or grilled.


10 posted on 08/05/2012 1:36:29 PM PDT by fatnotlazy
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Well yefragetuwrabrumuy it didn’t end after the war cause in the late 60’s a sailor on any transport that didn’t serve lunch was given a pasteboard box with one baloney sandwich and a apple. How they managed every time to produce the dryest sandwich and the mushiest apple I dont know. Ahhhhh those were good times


11 posted on 08/05/2012 1:39:33 PM PDT by djone (“Two ways to enslave a country. One by the sword. The other is by debt")
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To: djone

Oh lawdy, now you done flung a cravin’ unta me!


12 posted on 08/05/2012 1:42:02 PM PDT by ruesrose (It's possible to be clueless without being blonde.)
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To: djone
the last real butcher shop round here closed in the 90's when he was in his 80's...

and just like cold cuts, you got your steak/ham/etc sliced as thick or thin as you wanted while you watch

13 posted on 08/05/2012 1:45:05 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: djone

My Dad called bologna “Tennessee Tenderloin”.


14 posted on 08/05/2012 1:57:56 PM PDT by dainbramaged (If you want a friend, get a dog.)
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To: Pontiac

I can take you back to the mid-forties, in a little corner grocery store in
San Anselmo, California. Mr. Olson ( or Olie as we called him) would save the Bologna ends for us kids to catch Crawdads in Sir Francis Drake Creek .
Tie a string on the bologna bottom and dangle it into the shallow water
once the crawdad got hold of the bologna he wouldn’t let go.
We caught Crayfish by the bucket full.

Where would we be without Memories.


15 posted on 08/05/2012 1:59:23 PM PDT by Pompah
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To: fatnotlazy

I’m good with fried bologna but you haven’t lived until you’ve had it smoked right along with the ribs and brisket. That is an experience to savor.

BTW, it is smoked as a large chunk/roll, not by the slice.


16 posted on 08/05/2012 2:25:56 PM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: djone

I thought that dry sandwich/mushiest apple in the box lunch was strictly an Air Force specialty. It took an especially interesting twist when leaving the NATO Missile Firing Installation in Crete, Greece to return to West Germany. The NATO contractor for food service was Olympic Airways, the Greek national airline. I guess overcooked goat in a dry pita is the cultural equivalent to bologna in dry white bread.


17 posted on 08/05/2012 2:35:23 PM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: Pompah; Pontiac
Mr. Olson ( or Olie as we called him) would save the Bologna ends for us kids to catch Crawdads in Sir Francis Drake Creek . Tie a string on the bologna bottom and dangle it into the shallow water once the crawdad got hold of the bologna he wouldn’t let go. We caught Crayfish by the bucket full.

Green Lake (little sag pond* in Montclair Park, Oakland, CA): kids would use hot dogs as a very effective crawfish bait.

*Right next to the Hayward Fault!

18 posted on 08/05/2012 2:42:56 PM PDT by thecodont
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To: T-Bird45
In the 40s-80s there was a local meat market (Wood's) that made their own smoked bologna (Wood's bologna in Phoenix, NY). People would travel many miles to buy it.

Their bologna recipe was lost when the children closed the store after the owner's death. It so happens my hubby has closely copied the recipe. He just finished stuffing the casing for it to be smoked tomorrow. Yum!

19 posted on 08/05/2012 2:51:41 PM PDT by lysie
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To: lysie

Sold insurance around Hopkinsville Kentucky. There was this country store about 30 miles outside of nowhere. walk in tell the old man you wanted a “bloney”/cheese sandwich, pay him a quarter go on back slice your own cheese and “bloney” put some yellow mustard on bread make the sandwich. Stop in the way to the porch get a RC cola.

Out on the porch the old boys were talking bout farm stuff. They would always ask, “what you eaten today, boy” I would answer “bloney n cheese” they would say oh yeah-Old Shep sammich.

One old guy who heard I had served in the army in Germany, this was 1974 timeframe, asked me, “are they still fighting over there, boy? I told him no, they had stopped about 1945.

That store had homemade porksausage, home cured hams (no sodilum nitrite), great place, never forget it.


20 posted on 08/05/2012 3:14:14 PM PDT by ScareyFast63
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To: ScareyFast63

Yes. Ham with no sodium nitrites.


21 posted on 08/05/2012 3:23:32 PM PDT by lysie
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To: T-Bird45

Hey T-Bird that ‘overcooked goat in a dry pita’ sounds awful. The thing that mabe the dry sandwich worse was you didn’t have anything to drink with it. If you were lucky there might be a water cooler but no cups, so it gnaw on it get up get a sip of water and go back at it..... Was in Crete .... Whew what a place dirt streets, stray chickens, it looked like the set of a Beau Jest movie.... was glad to leave..


22 posted on 08/05/2012 4:19:43 PM PDT by djone (“Two ways to enslave a country, by the sword. or by debt")
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