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The Student Loan Debt Bubble Is Creating Millions Of Modern Day Serfs
TEC ^ | 09/14/2012 | Michael Snyder

Posted on 09/14/2012 9:28:07 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

Every single year, millions of young adults head off to colleges and universities all over America full of hopes and dreams. But what most of those fresh-faced youngsters do not realize is that by taking on student loan debt they are signing up for a life of debt slavery. Student loan debt has become a trillion dollar bubble which has shattered the financial lives of tens of millions of young college graduates. When you are just starting out and you are not making a lot of money, having to make payments on tens of thousands of dollars of student loan debt can be absolutely crippling. The total amount of student loan debt in the United States has now surpassed the total amount of credit card debt, and student loan debt is much harder to get rid of. Many young people view college as a "five year party", but when the party is over millions of those young people basically end up as modern day serfs as they struggle to pay off all of the debt that they have accumulated during their party years. Bankruptcy laws have been changed to make it incredibly difficult to get rid of student loan debt, so once you have it you are basically faced with two choices: either you are going to pay it or you are going to die with it.

But we don't warn kids about this before they go to school. We just endlessly preach to them that they need a college degree in order to get a "good job", and that after they graduate they will easily be able to pay off their student loans with the "good job" that they will certainly be able to find.

Sadly, tens of millions of young Americans have left college in recent years only to find out that they were lied to all along.

As I have written about previously, college has become a giant money making scam and the victims of the scam are our young people.

Back in 1952, a full year of tuition at Harvard was only $600.

Today, it is over $35,000.

Why does college have to cost so much?

At every turn our young people are being ripped off.

For example, the cost of college textbooks has tripled over the past decade.

Has it suddenly become a lot more expensive to print books?

Of course not.

The truth is that an entire industry saw an opportunity to gouge students and they went for it.

The amount of money being spent on higher education in this country is absolutely outrageous. One father down in Texas says that he will end up spending about 1.5 million dollars on college expenses for his five daughters before it is all said and done.

Unfortunately, most young adults in America don't have wealthy fathers so they have to take out large student loans to pay for their educations.

Average student loan debt at graduation is estimated to be about $28,720 right now.

That is a crazy figure and it has absolutely soared in recent years. In fact, student loan debt in America has grown by 511 percent since 1999.

And student loan debt will follow you wherever you go.

If you do not pay your loans when you graduate, you could end up having your wages, your tax refunds and even your Social Security benefits garnished.

In addition, your account could be turned over to the debt collectors and they can be absolutely brutal.

The student loan debt bubble is the best thing to happen to debt collectors in ages. The following is what one professional who works in the industry said in a recent article that he wrote for a debt collection industry publication....

As I wandered around the crowd of NYU students at their rally protesting student debt at the end of February, I couldn’t believe the accumulated wealth they represented – for our industry.

It was lip-smacking.

At my right, to graphically display how she was debt-burdened, was a girl wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the fine sum of $90,000, another with $65,000, a third with $20,000 and over there a really attractive $120,000 was printed on another shirt. Guys were shouldering their share, with t-shirts of $20,000, $15,000, $27,000, $33,000 and $75,000.

There is no way that our young people can afford to take on those kinds of debt loads, and that is one reason why student loan delinquency rates continue to surge.

In fact, the student loan default rate in the United States has nearly doubled since 2005.

Today, one out of every six Americans that owes money on a student loan is in default.

One out of every six.

And it is going to get a whole lot worse.

At this point there are about 5.9 million Americans that are at least 12 months behind on their student loan payments.

So could the bursting of the student loan bubble do tremendous damage to our financial system?

Don't worry - Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is promising that the student loan debt bubble won't cause a crisis.

And you can trust him, right?

For those living with the burden of unpaid student loan debt, life can be really tough. Some try to avoid the debt collectors, but it is easier said than done. The following is from a recent article in the New York Times....

Hiding from the government is not easy.

“I keep changing my phone number,” said Amanda Cordeiro, 29, from Clermont, Fla., who dropped out of college in 2010 and has fielded as many as seven calls a day from debt collectors trying to recover her $55,000 in overdue loans. “In a year, this is probably my fourth phone number.”

Unlike private lenders, the federal government has extraordinary tools for collection that it has extended to the collection firms. Ms. Cordeiro has already had two tax refunds seized, and other debtors have had their paychecks or Social Security payments garnisheed.

The biggest problem, of course, is that there are not nearly enough jobs for the hordes of college graduates that our system produces each year.

During 2011, 53 percent of all Americans with a bachelor's degree under the age of 25 were either unemployed or underemployed.

So without a good job, how are those young people supposed to service their student loans?

Once upon a time, a college degree was a guaranteed ticket to the middle class.

Sadly, those days are long gone. Today, millions upon millions of college graduates have taken jobs that do not even require a college education. The following is from a recent CNBC article....

In the last year, they were more likely to be employed as waiters, waitresses, bartenders and food-service helpers than as engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians combined (100,000 versus 90,000). There were more working in office-related jobs such as receptionist or payroll clerk than in all computer professional jobs (163,000 versus 100,000). More also were employed as cashiers, retail clerks and customer representatives than engineers (125,000 versus 80,000).

You probably know young people who have experienced the "wake up call" that comes as a result of entering the "real world" in this horrible economic environment.

It is not easy out there.

And this can be extremely disappointing for parents as well. How would you feel if your daughter got very high grades all of the way through college and ended up working as a waitress because she couldn't find anything else?

Even those that pursue advanced degrees are having an extremely challenging time finding work in this economy.

For example, a Business Insider article from a while back profiled a law school graduate named Erin that is actually on food stamps....

She remains on food stamps so her social life suffers. She can't afford a car, so she has to rely on the bus to get around Austin, Texas, where she lives. And currently unable to pay back her growing pile of law school debt, Gilmer says she wonders if she will ever be able to pay it back.

"That has been really hard for me," she says. "I have absolutely no credit anymore. I haven't been able to pay loans. It's scary, and it's a hard thing to think you’re a lawyer but you’re impoverished. People don’t understand that most lawyers actually aren’t making the big money."

And the really sad thing is that the quality of the education that our young people are receiving is very poor. I spent eight years attending U.S. universities, and most parents would be absolutely shocked at how little our college students are actually learning.

Going to college really has become a ticket to party for four or five or six years with a little bit of "education" thrown in.

But our society has put a very high value on those little pieces of paper called "diplomas" so we all continue to play along with the charade.

Some college students are finding other "creative" ways to pay for their educations other than going into tremendous amounts of debt. For example, an increasing number of young women are seeking out "sugar daddies" who will "sponsor" their educations. The following is from a Huffington Post article about this disturbing trend....

On a Sunday morning in late May, Taylor left her Harlem apartment and boarded a train for Greenwich, Conn. She planned on spending the day with a man she had met online, but not in person.

Taylor, a 22-year-old student at Hunter College, had confided in her roommate about the trip and they agreed to swap text messages during the day to make sure she was safe.

Once in Greenwich, a man who appeared significantly older than his advertised age of 42 greeted Taylor at the train station and then drove her to the largest house she had ever seen. He changed into his swimming trunks, she put on a skimpy bathing suit, and then, by the side of his pool, she rubbed sunscreen into the folds of his sagging back -- bracing herself to endure an afternoon of sex with someone she suspected was actually about 30 years her senior.

Of course that young woman will probably deeply regret doing that later on in her life.

Once graduation comes, millions upon millions of our young people are discovering that it is really hard to be financially independent if you are drowning in student loan debt and you can't find a good job.

So what are they doing?

They are moving back in with Mom and Dad.

One poll discovered that 29 percent of all Americans in the 25 to 34 year old age bracket are still living with their parents.

Ouch.



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Education; Society
KEYWORDS: bubble; tuition

1 posted on 09/14/2012 9:28:10 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

So what. The Federal debt has enslaved us all.


2 posted on 09/14/2012 9:32:12 AM PDT by Psycho_Bunny ("Insulting" Islam is as impossible as casting aspersions on a pile of dog crap.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Umberto Calvini:
"The government bankers want to control the debt,
And whoever controls the debt, controls everything.
This is the essence of the banking industry,
to make us all slaves to debt."

3 posted on 09/14/2012 9:33:37 AM PDT by Diogenesis (Vi veri veniversum vivus vici)
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To: Psycho_Bunny

4 posted on 09/14/2012 9:41:30 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
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To: SeekAndFind

Good. Let them move back in with Mom and Dad so they can afford to pay off their debt.


5 posted on 09/14/2012 9:41:52 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Diogenesis

6 posted on 09/14/2012 9:42:30 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
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To: 9YearLurker

I agree.


7 posted on 09/14/2012 9:50:50 AM PDT by Signalman
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To: SeekAndFind

I have to wonder how many of these students worked, while going to school and doubling up on the jobs during the summer?

I doubt the ones, with really high debts, did much to minimize their debt situation.


8 posted on 09/14/2012 9:56:23 AM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: SeekAndFind

the MSM continues to prepare the ground for Obama to announce a Student Loan Forgiveness scheme before the election


9 posted on 09/14/2012 9:59:23 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: 9YearLurker
Good. Let them move back in with Mom and Dad so they can afford to pay off their debt.

Borrowers and lenders sometimes make mistakes. When other sorts of debt are taken on, a borrower risks default and a loss of credit and the lender risks losing money. Both are unhappy with a default but at least they can move on.

But with student loans, a mistaken decision to take on debt by the borrower in youth means the borrower becomes an indentured servant to the lender. There is no way to move past the mistake. The government will hound the borrower for the rest of his life until the debt is paid. There is no bankruptcy. A criminal stealing $25,000 and blowing it on booze and hookers is more likely to escape the obligation to pay back the $25,000 than is a student that made the mistake of borrowing the same.

Students shouldn't be financially punished to the same extent criminals are punished. It doesn't make sense.

10 posted on 09/14/2012 10:02:05 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: SeekAndFind

“Many young people view college as a “five year party”

For American kids, college is all part of the prolonged incubation period they go through. They don’t want to grow up. Their parents sponsor the idiocy but want the rest of us to pay for the party.

It’s a reall dumb process and I am sure they’d be better off if they grew up after HS. They need to take some responsiblilty for themselves much sooner.

Some of them NEVER DO!


11 posted on 09/14/2012 10:06:48 AM PDT by SMARTY ("The man who has no inner-life is a slave to his surroundings. "Henri Frederic Amiel)
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To: conservative sympathizer

Without those repayment terms nobody would have voluntarily made those loans to what were bad risks.

To after the fact take away those terms would be a criminal redistribution of wealth to those who by all means ought to be able to repay—if only they’d make the work and lifestyle choices to do so. Often, their parents could have paid anyway, but chose not to because of the loans—which were made at very low rates anyway.

Obama already has a program by which students can ditch their debt by keeping a low-paying job and paying pennies on what they owe. That is already grossly unfair and distortive of the market.


12 posted on 09/14/2012 10:07:16 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Jonty30
I have to wonder how many of these students worked, while going to school and doubling up on the jobs during the summer?

I worked while in school and I still needed a loan.

Here's the trouble: when some students borrow money for school, that increases demand for education services. The institutions see the increased demand and raise prices. This price increase prices non-borrowers out of the market for an education. Those student then must get their own loans so that they can purchase the educations services they lost to other borrowers.

The "winners" of an education, then, are those that borrow the most money.

It's insidious. Of course those in the education industry love it. The students borrow that money and those in the education industry get to spend it.

13 posted on 09/14/2012 10:10:46 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: SeekAndFind
Didn't these mush brains understand that they were responsible for paying it back? If not, then how did someone so dumb get accepted and graduate from college??

The important question is, was the 4 years of beer and sex worth it?

14 posted on 09/14/2012 10:11:35 AM PDT by varon (I remember when America was American.)
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To: 9YearLurker

15 posted on 09/14/2012 10:16:45 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
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To: SeekAndFind
Somebody should tell the students that the reason they are going into such debt is to fund the increasingly lavish lifestyles of the liberal tenured university professors who are indoctrinating them.

Just ask Ward Churchill, Bill Ayers, Skip Gates, and Elizabeth Warren. Throw in Obama's cabinet secretaries and unconstitutional "czars" as well.

-PJ

16 posted on 09/14/2012 10:16:48 AM PDT by Political Junkie Too ( It doesn't I naturally when you're not natural born.)
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To: 9YearLurker
Without those repayment terms nobody would have voluntarily made those loans to what were bad risks.

Absolutely! And that would have been a good thing! Those repayment terms have created a perverse situation.

To after the fact take away those terms would be a criminal redistribution of wealth

And what form does that wealth take? It's the borrowers themselves that are the wealth. The government has promised the future product of these borrowers to the lenders and these borrowers have no escape. Borrowers have essentially sold themselves into slavery. If there is any redistribution of wealth, it takes the form of the borrower being given back his own body.

17 posted on 09/14/2012 10:21:03 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: varon

They knew they were going to have to pay it back, they just didn’t know the timing of their income. Going 20 or 30 grand in debt to be on a career path with a median income of 70 or 80 a year sounds like OK math, until you get out into the job market and learn you don’t get to median income until you have 10 years of experience at least, which is about the time your loan is scheduled to be paid off, meanwhile they’re lucky to pull down 30 and suddenly they get a $500 a month student loan bill. We’d do the students a favor if in the booklet about majors we’d stop listing median income and swap it for entry, it would also help to put in the booklet what percentage with that major actually get work in that field. 18 year olds have enough of a tendency to make bad decisions already, giving them bad information doesn’t help them any.


18 posted on 09/14/2012 10:24:43 AM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: SeekAndFind

When you apply for financial aid, they first ask you every possible question about your finances. Then they calculate what your annual family contribution should be. They subtract that from the total cost of the first year.

Then they tell you how much you will get in aid, and how much you will have to borrow.

I don’t know when they started doing this. They in effect make it a given that you will have to borrow. Most people don’t stop to think about it.


19 posted on 09/14/2012 10:25:14 AM PDT by firebrand
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To: varon
Didn't these mush brains understand that they were responsible for paying it back? If not, then how did someone so dumb get accepted and graduate from college??

They're not dumb. They're just inexperienced. How can you have lived so long and not understand the difference between intelligence and wisdom?

20 posted on 09/14/2012 10:26:27 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: conservative sympathizer

The education industry doesn’t really like it. Because all these loans come with a huge overhead for them. The financial aid department is often the largest department in a college, and they have to do the most recurring training. They don’t spike the price because of all the loan money coming in, the spike the price because their costs have gone up because they have to add more people with more training to an already huge department.


21 posted on 09/14/2012 10:30:22 AM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Ha ha!


22 posted on 09/14/2012 10:31:14 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: conservative sympathizer

What rightfully should be returned to the lenders—whether taxpayers or private—would be kept by loads of middle-class families who sent their kids on four or more years of Disneyland on someone else’s dime.

I bet you there’s nobody out there who couldn’t keep current on their stupid loans by working another 20 hours a week, and the vast majority of them could do it with just 5 more hours a week.

That’s what they should do to pay it off and if they do, maybe they actually will have learned something from their borrowed educations after all!


23 posted on 09/14/2012 10:35:11 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: discostu
The education industry doesn’t really like it. Because all these loans come with a huge overhead for them.

What a load of crap.

The education industry is under no obligation to accept anyone that can't pay.

If the overhead was such a burden, they'd simply refuse to participate -- but they don't refuse. They don't refuse because they make plenty of money from borrowers.

The education industry has turned into General Motors. They don't make money selling educations. They make money by facilitating the financing of educations.

24 posted on 09/14/2012 10:39:53 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: conservative sympathizer

It’s not a load of crap at all. It’s a fact. And yes actually if they want to be accredited they are under obligation to accept financial aid payments, it’s part of being “equal opportunity” which is a requirement for all the federal accreditations.

Financial aid is the only department at a college that sees over 75% of students (generally they see almost all students). Federal regulations change every single year causing retraining to have to happen every single year.

You got it half right, they don’t make money selling education. But the rest you got wrong, they make money on big time sports, or research grants, or not at all. Financial aid is a trap for them, it’s a money bleed.


25 posted on 09/14/2012 10:52:33 AM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: SeekAndFind
These students paid big time for an education.

They got one, just not the one they thought they were getting.

They had better get busy and make their fortune quickly, while they still know everything and their parents are still stupid, 'cause when their parents get smart, they won't even have a place to live.

26 posted on 09/14/2012 10:52:59 AM PDT by Navy Patriot
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To: 9YearLurker
I bet you there’s nobody out there who couldn’t keep current on their stupid loans by working another 20 hours a week, and the vast majority of them could do it with just 5 more hours a week.

That assumes jobs are available.

The current regulatory/tax/tort environment makes it risky to employ young, inexperienced workers. It often just isn't worth it.

Student loans have been masking this problem for years. The employment rate for 18-24 year olds is just 54%. Nearly 40% of that age group are in college. WIthout loans, the unemployment rate would make a nice jump -- and the government doesn't want that. It might make them look bad.

27 posted on 09/14/2012 10:54:03 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: discostu
Financial aid is the only department at a college that sees over 75% of students (generally they see almost all students). Federal regulations change every single year causing retraining to have to happen every single year.

Nice try.

It took me about 5 minutes of searching on the internet to discover that financial aid processing for a typical state system (Florida Universities) consumes a mere $50.5 million out of a $2.76 billion budget.

28 posted on 09/14/2012 11:08:48 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: conservative sympathizer

So what are you arguing—that we should continue to dish out humongous student loans to marginal students like crazy AND not make them pay them off?

If you’re a college grad, which is when you’ve got to start paying back your loans, you sure ought to be able to get a job at something. Many of those hanging at home are just waiting for their dream jobs, or choosing to take unpaid internships on the hope of advancing into a dream job. They really are about the last demographic taxpayers should be subsidizing.


29 posted on 09/14/2012 11:15:55 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: SeekAndFind

Don’t go to college unless you can afford it outright. Instead take low level jobs or unpaid internships where you would ultimately like to work (and stay home with mom and ad til you can afford your own place).


30 posted on 09/14/2012 11:21:00 AM PDT by Yaelle
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To: discostu

How long have you been around American colleges and universities? They’ve spiked the price like crazy because that’s what the market will bear since we’ve flooded them with cheap, subsidized loans and grants.

Meanwhile, they put a good chunk of that money into creating a deluxe, spa-like campus and lifestyle for the students they require less and less and less of, academically, all the time. Because the students, with their parents, are making the purchase decision but often not having to bother with the price tag.

Further, the colleges collude to make sure they don’t end up bidding against each other for the students they want.

It’s a corrupt and wasteful system that should be smashed back down to earth.


31 posted on 09/14/2012 11:27:05 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker
So what are you arguing—that we should continue to dish out humongous student loans to marginal students like crazy AND not make them pay them off?

Nope.

I would treat student loan debt like any other debt.

The only thing I might add is default insurance. A student might be asked to pay a premium each year while in school to cover the possibility of a default later on.

With default insurance, groups that tend to exploit bankruptcy law (like lawyers), or groups in financially marginal degree programs would be asked to pay a larger premium to cover the increased possibility of default.

Of course lenders might also charge higher rates to such groups so perhaps default insurance isn't necessary.

32 posted on 09/14/2012 11:33:50 AM PDT by conservative sympathizer
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To: conservative sympathizer

They’d only take out bigger loans to pay what would be inadequate default insurance to cover such easily weaseled-out-of loans.

I’d be with you if you said we should start writing loans that don’t have any extraordinary debt protection AND we should get the federal government out of student loans completely. But what’s already out there’s gotta be paid for. It’s a population that’s fully capable of paying for it if they’ll only work to.


33 posted on 09/14/2012 11:44:23 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Jonty30

My daughter has worked 30 hours a week, the entire time she has been in college. She has payed all of her own expenses, still lives at home and will graduate at the end of this semester debt free.


34 posted on 09/14/2012 12:08:06 PM PDT by yuleeyahoo (Liberty is not collective, it is personal. All liberty is individual liberty. - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: conservative sympathizer

And other parts of the budget?


35 posted on 09/14/2012 12:13:47 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: 9YearLurker

22 years. Long enough to see the FA staff at the college my wife works at triple.

Colleges big against each other for students all the time. Most of the time the only way a student ever actually pays for himself is when they join the alumni association.

It is a corrupt and wasteful system. But it’s NOT the corrupt and wasteful system you’re saying it is. It really all centers around the government. They push students to a financial aid system the colleges have to accept, the acceptance of which pushes up the costs for the college, which isn’t made up by government financing, so they pass the costs to the students, which drives more students to financial aid. The financial aid system does need to be broken apart, just understand who made the system as stupid as it is.


36 posted on 09/14/2012 12:21:47 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: discostu

I vehemently disagree with you that the cost of administering financial aid exceeds the increase in money that the colleges are able to rake in overall. College costs have been rising at multiples of the inflation rate for years because and only because government subsidies make it possible for their customers to agree to payments they otherwise couldn’t afford.

I agree with you that government is at the root of it, but higher ed has been making out like bandits from the system and spending lots of money wastefully to lure customers who are not cost conscious because they now have third-party payers, lenders and subsidizers.

And you’re right, the Ivies at least used to coordinate their aid offers, but the Dept of Justice made them stop. Early admission policies are a funky way to keep students from shopping in the marketplace, however.


37 posted on 09/14/2012 1:16:57 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

Well you can disagree, but all the colleges I know the finances on lose money on students until state and federal funding shows up, and with recent cuts in state funding they still lose money on students. Financial aid certainly isn’t the only cost driver, but it’s good to keep in mind that most if not all that increased money they’re “raking in” leaves. Running a college is expensive, tons of government regulation on everything you do, most of your employees are unionized, anytime you want to build or expand something everybody assumes you have deep pockets and your prices sky rocket. It’s an bad way to try to make money. Unless you’re a diploma mill, then a whole bunch of your problems evaporate.


38 posted on 09/14/2012 1:24:34 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: SeekAndFind

How dumb things happen at smart universities. The public’s UC Berkeley harvests family savings, Alumni donations, supporter’s money and taxes. Cal. ranked #1 public university total academic cost (resident) as a result of the Provost’s, Chancellor’s ‘charge residents higher tuition’. UCB tuition is rising faster than other universities.

Cal ranked # 2 in faculty earning potential. Spending on salaries increased 29% in last six years. Believe it: Harvard College less costly.

University of California negates the promise of equality of opportunity: access, affordability. Self-absorbed Provost Breslauer Chancellor Birgeneau are outspoken on ‘charging residents much higher’ tuition.

Birgeneau ($450,000) Breslauer ($306,000) like to blame the politicians, since they stopped giving them their entitled funding. The ‘charge instate students higher tuition’ skyrocketed fees by an average 14% per year from 2006 to 2011 academic years. If they had allowed fees to rise at the same rate of inflation over past 10 years they would still be in reach of middle income students. Breslauer Birgeneau increase disparities in higher education, defeat the promise of equality of opportunity, and create a less-educated work force.

Additional state tax funding must sunset. The sluggish economy, 10% unemployment devastates family savings. Simply asking for more taxes (Prop 30, 38) to spend on self-absorbed Cal. leadership, inefficient higher education practices, over-the-top salaries, bonuses, is not the answer.

UCB is to maximize access to the widest number of residence at a reasonable cost. Birgeneau Breslauer’s ‘charge Californians higher tuition’ denies middle income families the transformative value of Cal.

The California dream: keep it alive and well. Fire hapless Provost George W Breslauer. Clueless Chancellor Birgeneau resigned. Cal. leadership must accept responsibility for failing Californians.

Opinions? UC Board of Regents marsha.kelman@ucop.edu Calif. State Senators, Assembly members.


39 posted on 09/17/2012 9:56:57 PM PDT by Moravecglobal (UCB Chancellor Birgeneau Yudof UC budget crisis funding UCB excesses)
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