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To: Wyatt's Torch
Indeed. Greatest cartoon ever and my all time favorite.

Don't be exclusive:
Pogo Possum,
Tumbleweeds,
Li'l Abner,
Opus/Bloom County,
Sherman's Lagoon,
Howard the Duck,
(current) Day by Day...

Cartoons can come closer to reality than most of the news.

PS: I omitted Malard Filmore because it is overtly political,
And I omitted Junkwaffle and Cheech Wizard because they fall totally outside polite society, talented and funny, but weird.

23 posted on 09/18/2012 8:45:49 PM PDT by norton
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To: norton
I omitted Malard Filmore because it is overtly political,

And "Day by Day" isn't.

Riiiiight....

42 posted on 09/18/2012 10:21:17 PM PDT by thulldud (Is it "alter or abolish" time yet?)
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To: norton
Wow. I'm the other surviving Cheech Wizard fan. Vaughn Bode was brilliant but his was a very silly and self-destructive end.

Calvin and Hobbes, however, was in a class of its own. And this is a very sweet tribute. 26 years. I'm feeling kind of old.

49 posted on 09/18/2012 10:46:24 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: norton; Wyatt's Torch
Don't be exclusive: Pogo Possum,
Tumbleweeds,
Li'l Abner,
Opus/Bloom County,
Sherman's Lagoon,
Howard the Duck,
(current) Day by Day...


I had never thought of the best comic strip ever, and I am an avid comic strip reader.

I think one reason I never thought of a favorite is because the better newer authors had such obvious influence from the older authors. Charles Schulz inspired Lynn Johnston (For Better or Worse), Berke Breathed (Bloom County, Outland, Otis), and Bill Watterson. Chic Young inspired a lot of guys who couldn't do it nearly as well (Dik Young, Mort Walker). Some of the very old strips that were truly madcap probably influenced some of the absurdist stuff from the '80s on (Krazy Cat, Smokey Stover, Thimble Theater). Watterson himself admitted being influenced by Little Nemo in Slumberland (some AMAZING art in that early 20th century comic strip).

So to me, it's like asking who was the better scientist, Einstein or Sir Isaac Newton or Aristotle?

Of the list above, Tumbleweeds fails because the art is pathetic, one step up from Eek and Meek, and Mamma. I know smaller panels means shorter characters, but guys like Schulz and Ernie Bushmiller (the now respectable "Nancy") found a way to make it work.

Pogo always struck me as the most overrated comic strip ever. L'il Abner was great in its own way, and moved wonderfully quickly for a serial strip (compare with the plodding "Gasoline Alley" or "Brenda Starr"), but its appeal was too narrow for greatest of all time. And Al Capp was a character, to be sure.

Bloom County strips, like some of the Peanuts strips, have not aged so well.

Sherman's Lagoon's author has some conservative sympathies, but I can't remember laughing out loud at a single one. The art is pedestrian.

Not counting the nearly dead adventure/action/drama strips (Rip Kirby, Terry and the Pirates, Little Orphan Annie), I do think that Calvin and Hobbes certainly wins its era (with Honorable Mention to "The Far Side" for its absurdist genre. C&H brushes with fantasy, but never devolves into absurdity, except the absurdity of a little boy's imagination.) Dilbert wins in the post-comic strips should be suitable for the whole family category, follow C&H, which got a little risque at times, but was generally suited for everybody.

For earlier decades, I would have to give it to Peanuts (50s, 60s), Blondie (30s, 40s), Bringing Up Father (20s) with an honorable mention to Mutt and Jeff.
76 posted on 06/07/2014 11:27:53 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (“If you’re litigating against nuns, you’ve probably done something wrong.”-Ted Cruz)
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