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The first law of nature is NOT negotiable
Tom Hoefling ^ | January 11, 2013

Posted on 01/11/2013 7:38:40 AM PST by EternalVigilance

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The sight of the representatives of various national gun groups sitting down to negotiate with the Vice-President of the United States over more firearms restrictions was infuriating.

What were they even doing there? What is there to negotiate? The terms of surrender?


Why do these people always think they need a "seat at the table"?

Don't they realize that there are some tables you should never sit at?


Sorry, but what Sam Adams called the first law of nature is not negotiable. We either maintain our God-given, unalienable, natural right to self-defense or America has ceased to be.
 

America's Founders on the Right to Keep and Bear Arms:

“Among the natural rights of the Colonists are these: First, a right to life; Secondly, to liberty; Thirdly, to property; together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can. These are evident branches of, rather than deductions from, the duty of self-preservation, commonly called the first law of nature. … it is the greatest absurdity to suppose it in the power of one, or any number of men, at entering into society, to renounce their essential natural rights, or the means of preserving those rights; when the grand end of civil government, from the very nature of its institution, is for the support, protection, and defense of those very rights; the principal of which, as is before observed, are Life, Liberty, and Property. If men, through fear, fraud, or mistake, should in terms renounce or give up any essential natural right, the eternal law of reason and the grand end of society would absolutely vacate such renunciation. The right to freedom being the gift of God Almighty, it is not in the power of man to alienate this gift and voluntarily become a slave.”

– Samuel Adams, The Rights of the Colonists, The Report of the Committee of Correspondence to the Boston Town Meeting, Nov. 20, 1772

“The said Constitution [shall] be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms; or to raise standing armies, unless necessary for the defense of the United States, or of some one or more of them.”

– Samuel Adams, Debates & Proceedings in the Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (February 6, 1788)

“... whereas, to preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them...” – Samuel Adams, Constitutional Debates of the Massachusetts Convention of 1788 (also attributed to A Federal Farmer, the anti-federalist)

“To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace. A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.”

– George Washington, First Annual Message to Congress; Federal Hall, New York City (January 8, 1790)

“The laws that forbid the carrying of arms...disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. Can it be supposed that those who have the courage to violate the most sacred laws of humanity...will respect the less important and arbitrary ones... Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants, they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.”

– Thomas Jefferson, quoted from Enlightenment philosopher Cesare Beccaria’s On Crimes and Punishment, 1764; translated by Jefferson and copied into his Commonplace Book of great quotations.

“No freeman shall be debarred the use of arms ...”

– Thomas Jefferson, Draft Constitution for Virginia; June 13, 1776

“The supposed quietude of a good man allures the ruffian; while on the other hand, arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and the plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property. The same balance would be preserved were all the world destitute of arms, for all would be alike; but since some will not, others dare not lay them aside … Horrid mischief would ensue were one half the world deprived of the use of them …”.

– Thomas Paine, Thoughts On Defensive War, 1775

“...in this country, every man is a militia-man...”.

– Thomas Paine, The American Crisis series, # 9, dated June 9, 1780

“...who are the militia, if they be not the people of this country...? I ask, who are the militia? They consist now of the whole people, except a few public officers.” “No free government was ever founded or ever preserved its liberty, without uniting the characters of the citizen and soldier in those destined for the defense of the state.... Such are a well regulated militia, composed of the freeholders, citizen and husbandman, who take up arms to preserve their property, as individuals, and their rights as freemen.” “The great object is that every man be armed. Everyone who is able may have a gun.”

– Patrick Henry, from debates during the Constitutional convention (later quoted with approval by George Washington), as quoted in Elliot’s Debates, 1836

“Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are ruined.”

-- Patrick Henry (in the Virginia ratifying convention)

“Let a regular army, fully equal to the resources of the country, be formed; and let it be entirely at the devotion of the federal government; still it would not be going too far to say, that the State governments, with the people on their side, would be able to repel the danger. The highest number to which, according to the best computation, a standing army can be carried in any country, does not exceed one hundredth part of the whole number of souls; or one twenty-fifth part of the number able to bear arms. This proportion would not yield, in the United States, an army of more than twenty-five or thirty thousand men. To these would be opposed a militia amounting to near half a million of citizens with arms in their hands, officered by men chosen from among themselves, fighting for their common liberties, and united and conducted by governments possessing their affections and confidence. It may well be doubted, whether a militia thus circumstanced could ever be conquered by such a proportion of regular troops. Those who are best acquainted with the last successful resistance of this country against the British arms, will be most inclined to deny the possibility of it. Besides the advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation, the existence of subordinate governments, to which the people are attached, and by which the militia officers are appointed, forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition, more insurmountable than any which a simple government of any form can admit of. Notwithstanding the military establishments in the several kingdoms of Europe, which are carried as far as the public resources will bear, the governments are afraid to trust the people with arms. And it is not certain, that with this aid alone they would not be able to shake off their yokes. But were the people to possess the additional advantages of local governments chosen by themselves, who could collect the national will and direct the national force, and of officers appointed out of the militia, by these governments, and attached both to them and to the militia, it may be affirmed with the greatest assurance, that the throne of every tyranny in Europe would be speedily overturned in spite of the legions which surround it. Let us not insult the free and gallant citizens of America with the suspicion, that they would be less able to defend the rights of which they would be in actual possession, than the debased subjects of arbitrary power would be to rescue theirs from the hands of their oppressors.”

– James Madison, the Father of the U.S. Constitution, Federalist # 46

“[A] government resting on a minority is an aristocracy, not a Republic, and could not be safe with a numerical and physical force against it, without a standing army, an enslaved press, and a disarmed populace.”

-- James Madison, the Father of the U.S. Constitution

“...the loyalists in the beginning of the late war, who objected to associating, arming and fighting, in defense of our liberties, because these measures were not constitutional. A free people should always be left... with every possible power to promote their own happiness.”

- James Monroe, President of the United States

“If the representatives of the people betray their constituents, there is then no recourse left but in the exertion of that original right of self defense which is paramount to all positive forms of government.”

– Alexander Hamilton, Federalist # 28

“Little more can reasonably be aimed at with respect to the people at large than to have them properly armed and equipped...” “...an excellent body of well trained militia ready to take the field whenever the defense of the State shall require it. This will not only lessen the call for military establishments, but if circumstances should at any time oblige the government to form an army of any magnitude, that army can never be formidable to the liberties of the people while there is a large body of citizens, little if at all inferior to them in discipline and the use of arms who stand ready to defend their own rights and those of their fellow citizens.”

– Alexander Hamilton, Federalist # 29

“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.”

-- Benjamin Franklin

“[W]hen the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised by an artful man, who was governor of Pennsylvania, to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually, by totally disusing and neglecting the militia.” “I ask, who are the militia? They consist now of the whole people, except a few public officers. But I cannot say who will be the militia of the future day. If that paper on the table gets no alteration, the militia of the future day may not consist of all classes, high and low, and rich and poor; but they may be confined to the lower and middle classes of the people, granting exclusion to the higher classes of the people. If we should ever see that day, the most ignominious punishments and heavy fines may be expected. Under the present government, all ranks of people are subject to militia duty. Under such a full and equal representation as ours, there can be no ignominious punishment inflicted. But under this national, or rather consolidated government, the case will be different. The representation being so small and inadequate, they will have no fellow-feeling for the people.”

– George Mason, from debates during the Virginia state ratifying convention

“Are we at last brought to such an humiliating and debasing degradation that we cannot be trusted with arms for our own defense? Where is the difference between having our arms under our own possession and under our own direction, and having them under the management of Congress? If our defense be the real object of having those arms, in whose hands can they be trusted with more propriety, or equal safety to us, as in our own hands?”

-- George Mason

“Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed, as they are in almost every kingdom in Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretense, raised in the United States. A military force, at the command of Congress, can execute no laws, but such as the people perceive to be just and constitutional; for they will possess the power, and jealousy will instantly inspire the inclination, to resist the execution of a law which appears to the unjust and oppressive.”

– Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution (October 17, 1787)

“A militia when properly formed are in fact the people themselves...and include all men capable of bearing arms. The Constitution ought to secure a genuine militia and guard against a select militia, by providing that the militia shall always be kept well organized, armed, and disciplined, and include...all men capable of bearing arms. The mind that aims at a select militia, must be influenced by a truly anti-republican principle.” “To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them.” “... of the liberty of conscience in matters of religious faith, of speech and of the press; of the trial by jury of the vicinage in civil and criminal cases; of the benefit of the writ of habeas corpus; of the right to keep and bear arms.... If these rights are well defined, and secured against encroachment, it is impossible that government should ever degenerate into tyranny.”

– Richard Henry Lee, Letters From The Federal Farmer (1788)

“That the people have a right to keep and bear arms; that a well-regulated militia, composed of the body of the people trained to arms, is the proper, natural and safe defense of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, are dangerous to liberty, and therefore ought to be avoided, as far as the circumstances and protection of the community will admit.”

– Richard Henry Lee, proposed by the Virginia delegation to the Constitutional Convention (defining the phrase “well-regulated militia” which was used exactly in the final draft of the Second Amendment); and suggested in their state ratification debates, June 1788, to clarify the right.

“The rights of conscience, of bearing arms, of changing the government, are declared to be inherent in the people.”

– Fisher Ames, letter to F.R. Minoe (June 12, 1789)

“That the people have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and their own state, or the United States, or for the purpose of killing game; and no law shall be passed for disarming the people or any of them, unless for crimes committed, or real danger of public injury from individuals...”.

– Samuel Bryan, during debates on ratification of the Constitution in the Pennsylvania assembly

“The power of the sword is in the hands of Congress? My friends and countrymen, it is not so; for the powers of the sword are in the hands of the yeomanry of America from sixteen to sixty. The Militia of these free commonwealths, entitled and accustomed to their arms, when compared with any possible army, must be tremendous and irresistible. Who are the Militia? They are not ourselves as politicians and lawmakers. They are those who have elected us into our positions and entrusted us with the power of preserving and carrying out their wishes. Congress has no power to disarm the Militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American. The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the Federal or State governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.”

– Tenche Coxe, letter to James Madison during adoption of the Bill of Rights in the United States Congress (1789)


"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men..."

-- The Declaration of Independence


TOPICS: Government
KEYWORDS: banglist; donttreadonme; firearms; founders; guncontrol; nocompromise; rkba; secondamendment; youwillnotdisarmus

1 posted on 01/11/2013 7:38:47 AM PST by EternalVigilance
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To: EternalVigilance

Bump for later.


2 posted on 01/11/2013 7:45:44 AM PST by SandyInSeattle (2 Corinthians 4:8)
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To: SandyInSeattle

The quotes are from here:

http://www.minutemanrkba.com/americas-founders-on-rkba.html


3 posted on 01/11/2013 7:51:55 AM PST by EternalVigilance (Silence is a form of consent.)
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To: SandyInSeattle

http://www.minutemanrkba.com/why-rkba.html

The State Constitutions:

ALABAMA:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights

Section 26: Right to bear arms:

That every citizen has a right to bear arms in defense of himself and the state.

ALASKA:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 19: Right to Bear Arms:

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. The individual right to keep and bear arms shall not be denied or infringed by the State or a political subdivision of the State.

ARIZONA:

Article II: Declaration of Rights:

Section 26: Bearing arms:

The right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself or the state shall not be impaired, but nothing in this section shall be construed as authorizing individuals or corporations to organize, maintain, or employ an armed body of men.

ARKANSAS:

Article II: Declaration of Rights:

Section 5: The citizens of this state shall have the right to keep and bear arms for their common defense.

CALIFORNIA:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 1: All people are by nature free and independent and have inalienable rights. Among these are enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining safety, happiness, and privacy.

COLORADO:

Article 2: Bill of Rights:

Section 13. Right to Bear Arms:

The right of no person to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person and property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto legally summoned, shall be called in question; but nothing herein contained shall be construed to justify the practice of carrying concealed weapons.

CONNECTICUT:

Article First: Declaration of Rights: That the great and essential principles of liberty and free government may be recognized and established, WE DECLARE:

Section 15: Every citizen has a right to bear arms in defense of himself and the state.

DELAWARE:

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 20: A person has the right to keep and bear arms for the defense of self, family, home and state, and for hunting and recreational use.

FLORIDA:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights

Section 8: Right to Bear Arms:

(a) The right of the people to keep and bear arms in defense of themselves and of the lawful authority of the state shall not be infringed, except that the manner of bearing arms may be regulated by law.

(b) There shall be a mandatory period of three days, excluding weekends and legal holidays, between the purchase and delivery at retail of any handgun. For the purposes of this section, “purchase” means the transfer of money or other valuable consideration to the retailer, and “handgun” means a firearm capable of being carried and used by one hand, such as a pistol or revolver. Holders of a concealed weapon permit as prescribed in Florida law shall not be subject to the provisions of this paragraph.

(c) The legislature shall enact legislation implementing subsection (b) of this section, effective no later than December 31, 1991, which shall provide that anyone violating the provisions of subsection (b) shall be guilty of a felony.

(d) This restriction shall not apply to a trade in of another handgun.

GEORGIA:

Article I: Bill of Rights:

Section I: Rights of Persons:

Paragraph VIII: Arms, right to keep and bear:

The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, but the General Assembly shall have power to prescribe the manner in which arms may be borne.

HAWAII:

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 17: Right To Bear Arms:

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

IDAHO:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 1: Inalienable Rights Of Man:

All men are by nature free and equal, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property; pursuing happiness and securing safety.

Section 11: Right To Keep And Bear Arms:

The people have the right to keep and bear arms, which right shall not be abridged; but this provision shall not prevent the passage of laws to govern the carrying of weapons concealed on the person nor prevent passage of legislation providing minimum sentences for crimes committed while in possession of a firearm, nor prevent the passage of legislation providing penalties for the possession of firearms by a convicted felon, nor prevent the passage of any legislation punishing the use of a firearm. No law shall impose licensure, registration or special taxation on the ownership or possession of firearms or ammunition. Nor shall any law permit the confiscation of firearms, except those actually used in the commission of a felony.

ILLINOIS:

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 22: Right to Arms:

Subject only to the police power, the right of the individual citizen to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

INDIANA:

Article I: Bill of Rights:

Section 32: Bearing Arms:

The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State.

IOWA:

Article I: Bill of Rights:

Section 1:Rights of persons: All men are, by nature, free and equal, and have certain inalienable rights - among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.

Article 6: Militia:

Section 1: Composition — training:

The militia of this state shall be composed of all able-bodied male citizens, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, except such as are or may hereafter be exempt by the laws of the United States, or of this state, and shall be armed, equipped, and trained, as the general assembly may provide by law.

KANSAS:

Kansas Bill of Rights:

Section 4: Bear arms; armies.

The people have the right to bear arms for their defense and security; but standing armies, in time of peace, are dangerous to liberty, and shall not be tolerated, and the military shall be in strict subordination to the civil power.

Article 8: Militia

Section 1: Composition; exemption. The militia shall be composed of all able-bodied male citizens between the ages of twenty-one and forty-five years, except such as are exempted by the laws of the United States or of this state; but all citizens of any religious denomination whatever who from scruples of conscience may be adverse to bearing arms shall be exempted therefrom, upon such conditions as may be prescribed by law.

KENTUCKY:

Bill of Rights:

All men are, by nature, free and equal, and have certain inherent and inalienable rights, among which may be reckoned:

First: The right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties.

Fifth: The right of acquiring and protecting property.

Seventh: The right to bear arms in defense of themselves and of the State, subject to the power of the General Assembly to enact laws to prevent persons from carrying concealed weapons.

LOUISIANA:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 11: Right to Keep and Bear Arms:

The right of each citizen to keep and bear arms shall not be abridged, but this provision shall not prevent the passage of laws to prohibit the carrying of weapons concealed on the person.

MAINE:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 1: Natural rights:

All people are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.

Section 16: To keep and bear arms:

Every citizen has a right to keep and bear arms and this right shall never be questioned.

MARYLAND:

Declaration of Rights

Article 2:

The Constitution of the United States, and the Laws made, or which shall be made, in pursuance thereof, and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, are, and shall be the Supreme Law of the State; and the Judges of this State, and all the People of this

State, are, and shall be bound thereby; anything in the Constitution or Law of this State to the contrary notwithstanding.

Article 28:

That a well regulated Militia is the proper and natural defense of a free Government.

MASSACHUSETTS:

1780
Part the First: A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts:

Article I:

All people are born free and equal and have certain natural, essential and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.

Annulled and replaced:

Article CVI. Article I of Part the First of the Constitution is hereby annulled and the following is adopted:-

All people are born free and equal and have certain natural, essential and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness. Equality under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of sex, race, color, creed or national origin.

Article XVII:

The people have a right to keep and to bear arms for the common defense. And as, in time of peace, armies are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be maintained without the consent of the legislature; and the military power shall always be held in an exact subordination to the civil authority, and be governed by it.

NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS (1780):

decided that the general Massachusetts declaration did not state the right with sufficient clarity and openness, and passed the following resolve: “The people have a right to keep and bear arms as well for their own as the common defense.”

WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS (1780):

decided that the general Massachusetts declaration was not sufficiently strong, and voted to include their own resolve: “That the people have a right to keep and bear Arms for their own and the Common defense.” Further voting on the reason: “...we esteem it an essential privilege to keep Arms in our houses for our own defense and while we continue honest and lawful subjects of government we ought never to be deprived of them.” The town deemed it necessary to explicitly protect the right in order to prevent the possibility: “That the legislature in some future period may confine all the firearms to some public magazine and thereby deprive the people of the use of them.”

MICHIGAN:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 6: Bearing of arms:

Every person has a right to keep and bear arms for the defense of himself and the state.

MINNESOTA:

No reference in the present Constitution.

MISSISSIPPI:

Article III: Bill of Rights:

Section 12: The right of every citizen to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person, or property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto legally summoned, shall not be called in question, but the legislature may regulate or forbid carrying concealed weapons.

MISSOURI:

Article I: Bill of Rights:

Section 23: Right to keep and bear arms — exception:

That the right of every citizen to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person and property, or when lawfully summoned in aid of the civil power, shall not be questioned; but this shall not justify the wearing of concealed weapons.

MONTANA:

Article 2: Declaration of Rights:

Section 3. Inalienable rights:

All persons are born free and have certain inalienable rights. They include the right to a clean and healthful environment and the rights of pursuing life’s basic necessities, enjoying and defending their lives and liberties, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and seeking their safety, health and happiness in all lawful ways. In enjoying these rights, all persons recognize corresponding responsibilities.

Article 2: Declaration of Rights:

Section 12: Right to bear arms:

The right of any person to keep or bear arms in defense of his own home, person, and property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto legally summoned, shall not be called in question, but nothing herein contained shall be held to permit the carrying of concealed weapons.

NEBRASKA:

Article I: Statement of rights:

CI-1 All persons are by nature free and independent, and have certain inherent and inalienable rights; among these are life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness, and the right to keep and bear arms for security or defense of self, family, home, and others, and for lawful common defense, hunting, recreational use, and all other lawful purposes, and such rights shall not be denied or infringed by the state or any subdivision thereof. To secure these rights, and the protection of property, governments are instituted among people, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.

NEVADA:

Article 1:

Section 1: All men are by Nature free and equal and have certain inalienable rights among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; Acquiring, Possessing and Protecting property and pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.

Section 11: Right to keep and bear arms; civil power supreme:

1. Every citizen has the right to keep and bear arms for security and defense, for lawful hunting and recreational use and for other lawful purposes.

2. The military shall be subordinate to the civil power; No standing army shall be maintained by this State in time of peace, and in time of War, no appropriation for a standing army shall be for a longer time than two years.

NEW HAMPSHIRE:

In ratifying the new U.S. Constitution, proposed adding a Bill of Rights which would include the following clause: “Congress shall never disarm any citizen unless such as are or have been in actual rebellion.”

Part First: Bill of Rights:

Article 2-a: The Bearing of Arms:

All persons have the right to keep and bear arms in defense of themselves, their families, their property and the state.

NEW JERSEY:

Article I: Rights and Privileges:

Section 1: All persons are by nature free and independent, and have certain natural and unalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.

NEW MEXICO:

Article II: Bill of Rights:

Section 6: Right to bear arms:

No law shall abridge the right of the citizen to keep and bear arms for security and defense, for lawful hunting and recreational use and for other lawful purposes, but nothing herein shall be held to permit the carrying of concealed weapons. No municipality or county shall regulate, in any way, an incident of the right to keep and bear arms.

NEW YORK:

Conditioned its ratification of the new U.S. Constitution on adoption of the following: “That the people have a right to keep and bear arms; that a well regulated militia, including the body of the people capable of bearing arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state.”

The New York Constitution of 1777 contained no Bill of Rights, but its framers insisted that the federal Constitution include such provisions. In addition, the members of the constitutional convention in New York “were obliged to go armed, so as to protect themselves from stray marauding parties ....”.

No reference in the present Constitution.

NORTH CAROLINA:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 30: Militia and the right to bear arms:

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; and, as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty. they shall not be maintained, and the military shall be kept under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power. Nothing herein shall justify the practice of carrying concealed weapons, or prevent the General Assembly from enacting penal statutes against that practice.

NORTH DAKOTA:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 1: All men are by nature equally free and independent and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property and reputation; and pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness; and to keep and bear arms for the defense of their person, family, property, and the state, and for lawful hunting, recreational, and other lawful purposes, which shall not be infringed.

Article 11: General Provisions:

Section 16. The militia of this state shall consist of all able-bodied male persons residing in the state, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, except such as may be exempted by the laws of the United States or of this state. Persons whose religious tenets or conscientious scruples forbid them to bear arms shall not be compelled to do so in times of peace, but shall pay an equivalent for a personal service.

OHIO:

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 1.04: Bearing arms; standing armies; military powers:

The people have the right to bear arms for their defense and security; but standing armies, in time of peace, are dangerous to liberty, and shall not be kept up; and the military shall be in strict subordination to the civil power.

OKLAHOMA:

Article 2: Bill of Rights:

Section 26: Bearing arms — Carrying weapons:

The right of a citizen to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person, or property, or in aid of the civil power, when thereunto legally summoned, shall never be prohibited; but nothing herein contained shall prevent the Legislature from regulating the carrying of weapons.

OREGON:

Article I: Bill of Rights:

Section 27: Right to bear arms; military subordinate to civil power.

The people shall have the right to bear arms for the defense of themselves, and the State, but the Military shall be kept in strict subordination to the civil power.

PENNSYLVANIA:

1776

“That the people have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the state; and as standing armies in the time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be kept up...”

1790

“That the right of the citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the state shall not be questioned.”

Present Constitution

Article 1: Declaration Of Rights:

Section 1: Inherent Rights of Mankind:

All men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent and indefeasible rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring, possessing and protecting property and reputation, and of pursuing their own happiness.

Section 21: Right to Bear Arms:

The right of the citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the State shall not be questioned.

RHODE ISLAND:

Article 1: Declaration Of Certain Constitutional Rights And Principles:

Section 22: Right to bear arms:

The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

SOUTH CAROLINA:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 20: Right to keep and bear arms; armies; military power subordinate to civil authority; how soldiers quartered:

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. As, in times of peace, armies are dangerous to liberty, they shall not be maintained without the consent of the General Assembly. The military power of the State shall always be held in subordination to the civil authority and be governed by it. No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner nor in time of war but in the manner prescribed by law.

SOUTH DAKOTA:

Article 6: Bill of Rights:

Section 24: Right to bear arms:

The right of citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the state shall not be denied.

TENNESSEE:

Article 1: Declaration of Rights:

Section 24: That the sure and certain defense of a free people, is a well regulated militia; and, as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to freedom, they ought to be avoided as far as the circumstances and safety of the community will admit; and that in all cases the military shall be kept in strict subordination to the civil authority.

TEXAS:

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 23: Right to Keep and Bear Arms:

Every citizen shall have the right to keep and bear arms in the lawful defense of himself or the State; but the Legislature shall have power, by law, to regulate the wearing of arms, with a view to prevent crime.

UTAH:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 6: Right to bear arms:

The individual right of the people to keep and bear arms for security and defense of self, family, others, property, or the state, as well as for other lawful purposes shall not be infringed; but nothing herein shall prevent the legislature from defining the lawful use of arms.

VERMONT:

1777

Article 1:

That all persons are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent, and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety; therefore no person born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person as a servant, slave or apprentice, after arriving to the age of twenty-one years, unless bound by the person’s own consent, after arriving to such age, or bound by law for the payment of debts, damages, fines, costs, or the like.

Present Constitution

Chapter I. A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the State of Vermont

Article 16th: Right to bear arms; standing armies; military power subordinate to civil:

That the people have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the State — and as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be kept up; and that the military should be kept under strict subordination to and governed by the civil power.

VIRGINIA:

1776

Article 1, Section 13. Militia; standing armies; military subordinate to civil power.

That a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state, therefore, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.

Present Constitution

Article 1: Bill of Rights:

Section 13. Militia; standing armies; military subordinate to civil power:

That a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state, therefore, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.

WASHINGTON:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section 24: Right to Bear Arms:

The right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself, or the state, shall not be impaired, but nothing in this section shall be construed as authorizing individuals or corporations to organize, maintain or employ an armed body of men.

WEST VIRGINIA:

Article 3: Bill of Rights:

Section Con.3-22: Right to Keep and Bear Arms:

A person has the right to keep and bear arms for the defense of self, family, home and state, and for lawful hunting and recreational use.

WISCONSIN:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section25: Right to Keep and Bear Arms:

The people have the right to keep and bear arms for security, defense, hunting, recreation or any other lawful purpose.

WYOMING:

Article I: Declaration of Rights:

Section:97-1-024: The right of citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and of the state shall not be denied.


4 posted on 01/11/2013 7:54:03 AM PST by EternalVigilance (Silence is a form of consent.)
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To: EternalVigilance
What is there to negotiate? The terms of surrender?

That's what 0bamugabe has in mind. That's how he negotiated 0bama Care. That's how he negotiated the auto industry bailouts. That's how he negotiated handing over documents on F&F and Holder testifying on F&F. That's how he negotiated the 'fiscal cliff.'

5 posted on 01/11/2013 8:03:08 AM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: TigersEye
‎"Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws. On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place."

-— Frédéric Bastiat


6 posted on 01/11/2013 8:06:26 AM PST by EternalVigilance (Silence is a form of consent.)
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To: EternalVigilance

BTTT!


7 posted on 01/11/2013 8:22:29 AM PST by The Mayor ("If you can't make them see the light, let them feel the heat" — Ronald Reagan)
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To: EternalVigilance
What is there to negotiate? The terms of surrender?

As long as it's their surrender and not ours.

8 posted on 01/11/2013 8:31:34 AM PST by KrisKrinkle (Blessed be those who know the depth and breadth of their ignorance. Cursed be those who don't.)
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To: EternalVigilance

If those filthy legislators don’t regard God’s word as sacrosanct, what makes you think the Constitution and Bill of Rights is inviolate? They don’t give a damn about our natural inherent human rights as described in those documents.


9 posted on 01/11/2013 9:32:01 AM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: NewJerseyJoe

P4L


10 posted on 01/11/2013 9:44:03 AM PST by NewJerseyJoe (Rat mantra: "Facts are meaningless! You can use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!")
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To: EternalVigilance

Excellent quote.


11 posted on 01/11/2013 1:24:04 PM PST by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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