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To: Pharmboy; SeekAndFind

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach

Thanks SeekAndFind.
We know from English literature that the United States represented a fresh start for insolvents from the lower and upper classes, which makes sense when we learn that both Dickens' father went to debtor's prison and Trollope's father fled England to avoid it... as many as two-thirds of Europeans arriving in the Colonies were debtors, paying their way as indentured servants. The colonial governments of Virginia and North Carolina for their part, eager for laborers, passed incentives by promising 5 years' worth of debt protection. The founder of Georgia, James Oglethorpe, specifically started the colony as a debtor's refuge in 1732, as an alternative to English debtors' prison... Founding Fathers Jefferson and Washington were so up to their necks in debt to London bankers that the Declaration of Independence from England not only served democratic Enlightenment ideals but also their own balance sheets... the English tradition of locking up debtors in prison jumped the Atlantic and came to the American colonies and the young United States. Debtors through colonial times and the first 40 years of the Republic routinely got locked up in brutal prisons -- often for very small amounts. There the debtor would stay, half-starved and dependent upon alms from passers-by, until someone -- usually a relative -- paid the debt. New York became the first state in the nation to outlaw debtors' prisons in 1831, paving the way for other states to follow suit. Debtors' prisons largely predated proper bankruptcy law, which makes sense as bankruptcy would always be preferable to prison.
Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


6 posted on 02/03/2013 10:22:23 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Until fairly recently Colorado had a “body execution” law on the books - i.e. you could lock your judgment debtor up. It was assumed, however, that if anyone actually tried to use it, the law would be declared unconstitutional.


7 posted on 02/05/2013 5:24:08 PM PST by colorado tanker
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