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To: Rocky
Interesting talk. I have spent many years hiking in the western US. In especially dry areas, trees and shrubs are spaced so far away that there is quite a bit of open ground in between. This soil is being held together by macrobiotic algae. It feels like a crust on top of the soil, with sand underneath.

The government tells us that this macrobiotic soil is a good thing, because it keeps down soil erosion. but this man is saying the opposite, that the macrobiotic soil causes too much runoff.

I believe there may also be another component missing, in that there needs to be more mycelium underneath and throughout the grass roots, which also help store water.

12 posted on 03/09/2013 2:30:44 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: Vince Ferrer

Animal population stops desertification by breaking up that top crust with their hoofs, so the water can get to the soil beneath instead of running off.

Freeper Carry_okie has a web book about this very thing. Ask him.


30 posted on 03/09/2013 5:50:13 PM PST by WVNan
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