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This Boston mom was ready for the worst
The Survival Mom ^ | 4/23/13

Posted on 04/26/2013 12:53:29 PM PDT by Kartographer

I wanted to reach out to you because I found your website last fall when I was bracing for a hurricane and had a 3 week old. I had not thought before he arrived about what to do in an emergency. But since finding you I have slowly begun to change some things for long term storage and safety for my family.

(Excerpt) Read more at thesurvivalmom.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: prepparedness; preppers
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From our own ChocChipCookie's Site.
1 posted on 04/26/2013 12:53:29 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!

Please consider this our Weekly Preppers’Thread to post progress, good buys, DIY, ideas amd questions.


2 posted on 04/26/2013 12:54:53 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
We have friends and neighbors who were caught off guard on Friday, with empty cabinets, a sense of helplessness, and they were worried about being stuck in their homes for days.

Not even 9 meals away.
3 posted on 04/26/2013 1:07:31 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: PA Engineer

Precisely, now imagine all those people who panic and rush the stores just hours ahead of a huricane or a blizzard and then something completely unexpected comes up with no warning at all a complete blindside what happens then?


4 posted on 04/26/2013 1:13:33 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: PA Engineer
That is sad. I can't imagine having to go to the grocery store every couple of weeks, much less, every few days.

/johnny

5 posted on 04/26/2013 1:30:34 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Kartographer
Precisely, now imagine all those people who panic and rush the stores just hours ahead of a huricane or a blizzard and then something completely unexpected comes up with no warning at all a complete blindside what happens then?

Not sure what other people will be doing, but my moat bridge will be in the upright and stowed position. ;-)
6 posted on 04/26/2013 1:30:53 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: Kartographer
I have long tried to think of a simple way to explain the necessity for prepping for an emergency.

I have boiled it down to this: If you depend on other people and man made machines to provide you with the necessities of life, you must prepare to provide yourself with whatever that is.

You see, other people and man made machines don't always work for whatever reason.

In the case of the “Shelter in Place” in Boston/Watertown, ordered by the Governor of Mass., the behavior of PEOPLE created that emergency. If you needed milk, better have some packages of instant milk. Took your last pill of “x” medicine the day before and hadn't already ordered and picked up a refill? Out of diapers and none put back for an emergency? No toilet paper and none put back for an emergency?

Remember, dependence on others and man made machines is a formula for an emergency. A hurricane will take out electricity machines and may take out water machines. An ice storm will take out electricity machines and maybe water machines. Car machines would be dangerous on an icy road.

Don't trust other people and man made machines - trust yourself to provide those services - water, food, security, roof over your head, light, way to cook, way to stay warm, way to stay cool, way to treat wounds and illness, way to communicate.

TRUST YOURSELF TO PROVIDE WHAT YOU NEED TO LIVE.

7 posted on 04/26/2013 1:52:43 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: JRandomFreeper
That is sad. I can't imagine having to go to the grocery store every couple of weeks, much less, every few days.

Yeah. I think the reliance on "normalcy" is just another form of idol worship, or a belief in a false god. Heck, I was kicking myself for running low on soft cat treats and having to go to the store (elderly cat with bad teeth). I fear greatly for our country.
8 posted on 04/26/2013 2:22:09 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: JRandomFreeper; Kartographer
Let's take a look at Britain:

I watched my son and his wife in England go up the economic ladder there. Most people stay where my son and wife started out. In most kitchens, there is a kitchen sink and it has a hot handle a cold handle - the waters are not mixed. There is no automatic dishwasher as only the more wealthy have one. There are very few microwaves as those are very expensive - almost no one has one. There is a very small refrigerator with no freezer section. The kitchen stove is usually gas.

If you consider the above which is what the greater number of people have, you will understand why they go to the grocery at least every other day. Fresh meat will only last a few days in the fridge and there is no freezer. Veggies will last maybe four days in the fridge, however since they don't eat much meat since it is so expensive, their meal is usually veggies and pasta and hopefully some chicken or fish. Chicken and fish is their meat and eaten shortly after buying.

I guarantee you, if trucks stopped delivering food, they would start starving in no more than three days. They might have a couple of bottles of water and that's it, if they even have that.

My son and daughter were given the money for a clothes washer by her mother. The next time I went there, I took cash for them to change to pounds to buy a dryer. Most people do not have a dryer - they hang their clothes outside on a clothes line - yes, in US history, people used to do that here. Actually, in my younger days, I can remember going out in the cold to gather diapers off the line and they were frozen. When I got a dryer, I thought it was the most wonderful machine ever made.

My point is, the people of Britain would die by the millions if trucks or water stopped for any reason for several months or longer. When we think our average people would have trouble existing in an extended emergency, it is nothing compared to the British.

9 posted on 04/26/2013 2:38:25 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Kartographer

People in my highly liberal area used to argue with me about the need for preparedness. Now I just remind them of the Snowmaggeddon three years ago or the derecho storm two years ago. No power, no food to buy, and no way to buy gas so one could get away and go find resources. People in this prosperous area were hungry and scared. Now some of hem don’t think I’m quite so crazy.


10 posted on 04/26/2013 2:41:23 PM PDT by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare--now a Marine Mom)
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To: Marcella
Running hot water? Dishwasher? Microwave? Washer/Dryer? Nyet, babushka. I do not have and do not need. ;)

I don't pick up many chicks, but I'm happy with my 1870s lifestyle. With a clothesline strung up in the kitchen for when it rains.

/johnny

11 posted on 04/26/2013 2:45:37 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

How do you wash your clothes?


12 posted on 04/26/2013 3:04:13 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: Bigg Red
I either barter for getting them washed, or heat water on the stove and wash them in the sink, like I did on deployment year after year.

/johnny

13 posted on 04/26/2013 3:08:29 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
“Running hot water? Dishwasher? Microwave? Washer/Dryer? Nyet, babushka. I do not have and do not need. ;)”

Although you use the name, “babushka”, as an endearing term for me, everyone here should know that means, “OLD WOMAN”, or “GRANDMOTHER”. You silly young man.

You cannot be compared to people living in a civilized country. You choose, instead, a bare existence with one exception - you will always have food and security for as long as you live. In an absolute worst scenario of scorched earth, I would rather live near you than any person I know or have read about in fiction or nonfiction. James Wesley, Rawles? He is a playboy compared to you.

14 posted on 04/26/2013 3:14:06 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Bigg Red

“How do you wash your clothes?”

First, he doesn’t wear many clothes, especially in the summer.

You should have asked, “How do you take a bath?”


15 posted on 04/26/2013 3:20:00 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Marcella
Good food. I'm not eating some freeze dried crap just because the world as we know it ended.

/johnny

16 posted on 04/26/2013 3:26:04 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

“Good food. I’m not eating some freeze dried crap just because the world as we know it ended.”

I know, that’s why I’d prefer to be somewhere near you when my other stored food ran out. You could teach me how to procure your kind of food plus you grow good food.


17 posted on 04/26/2013 3:32:20 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Marcella
You could teach me how to procure

There's a bordello and piano joke in there somewhere.....

I play piano.

/johnny

18 posted on 04/26/2013 3:35:37 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: PA Engineer

“Not even 9 meals away”

Remember the pics of the cop delivering MILK to some family during the lockdown?

Good grief. Who has kiddies and allows themselves to run out of milk?


19 posted on 04/26/2013 3:53:18 PM PDT by LadyBuck (....and we're off to the rodeo......)
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To: Marcella

Well, I could take a bath if I had a way of heating my water. Years ago, when I had small children, a yearly fall vacation was spent in a rustic cabin that had electricity but now plumbing. We had a big old galvanized tub, and that is what we used to bathe the children and to bathe ourselves. So I could do that, but I can’t imagine living without a washing machine.


20 posted on 04/26/2013 4:12:27 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Okay, you are very self-sufficient.


21 posted on 04/26/2013 4:14:08 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: Bigg Red
Cheap barstid is the phrase you are looking for. ;)

/johnny

22 posted on 04/26/2013 4:19:26 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: LadyBuck
I use dry milk almost exclusively, because I don't drink it. I just cook with it. But I buy it in 5 gallon buckets because I've got grandkids, and they might need it one day. And if they don't, I'll use it in my normal lifestyle.

It's a sorry parent/grandparent that doesn't provide for their children/grandchildren.

/johnny

23 posted on 04/26/2013 4:22:12 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: LadyBuck

“Good grief. Who has kiddies and allows themselves to run out of milk?”

==

Well I never ran out of milk for my children,but if I did they would have survived very nicely drinking water.

The person who had the police officer get the milk is an ass and the officer should have refused. It was only for a few hours,for heaven’s sake,not months.

.


24 posted on 04/26/2013 4:22:59 PM PDT by Mears
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To: Bigg Red; JRandomFreeper
How do you wash your clothes?

He doesn't. When his clothes get dirty he just jumps in the ocean, picks a fight with a polar bear, and lets the ensuing agitation get them clean ;o).

25 posted on 04/26/2013 4:37:04 PM PDT by papertyger (Blessed are the flexible for they shall not be broken....)
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To: Marcella; JRandomFreeper; All

Ha Ha. I get a kick out of you two yapping back and forth. When I was just a kid, we went into town for wash day with Granny. There was a big building with a whole bunch of wringer washers and tubs.

Outdoors was a huge yard of lots and lots of clothes lines for the customers to use. That was the laundromat of old. Of course some things were washed in between and hung out on the line at home.

Showers were outdoors too. Used a tin sprinkler can. Heated a little water on the stove and mixed with cold water hauled by the bucket fulls from the well. Wet your hands and soap up all over. Then Granny held the sprinkler over you and rinsed all the soap off.

In the winter, there was a big galvanized tub brought indoors and blankets/sheets hung from the ceiling in the kitchen to provide some privacy.

When I first got married, we couldn’t afford to go to the laundromat, so I put all the whites in a big waterbath canner with detergent and when it boiled for a while, then I dumped it into the kitchen sink. Used a designated plunger to agitate the load.

Once it was cooled down enough I worked the clothes by hand as needed. Then wring them out by hand and put in the other sink for rinsing, and hung them outside on the line.
In the winter, I had a foldable gizmo that I could set up in the bath tub to hang stuff from. Hung shirts on hangers on the shower rod.

I washed a load every day hung it to dry in the am, folded and put away in the pm.

Then my aunt loaned me a portable washer. It was a little larger than the water bath canner. Had a motor in the lid that fit over an agitator. Once you had the lid on and twisted to seal it, you just plugged it in for agitation. Then rinse and wring out the stuff and hang it up wherever.

Eventually, we had more stuff to make life easier, but one time our hot water heater went out and we didn’t have the money to fix it for about 6 months. So we went back to the old shower can and used it in the bathtub. It wasn’t a big deal.LOL


26 posted on 04/26/2013 4:45:11 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: papertyger
I am much too frail to handle a polar bear these days. But I do have recipes...

/johnny

27 posted on 04/26/2013 4:51:19 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

A relative of mine has a ranch about 50 minutes drive from a large town. She commented that she goes into town every 2-3 months. Her husband made the trip once a year. (The small town a few miles away had a small school, and perhaps a small store - but I didn’t see it).

At the time I thought that was a bit too much isolation. Now I don’t!


28 posted on 04/26/2013 4:52:21 PM PDT by 21twelve ("We've got the guns, and we got the numbers" adapted and revised from Jim M.)
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To: greeneyes
For a tiny little house I have a VERY large kitchen. In earlier days, there was a #2 tub for Saturday nights that got brought into the kitchen.

/johnny

29 posted on 04/26/2013 4:53:45 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I can't imagine having to go to the grocery store every couple of weeks, much less, every few days.

I only go about once a month though broke that rule this week when hubby decided he needed to low carb again. Though I have to admit the first thing when I saw the bombings I thought of (ok, second after "it's muzzy terrorists, again") was what was short on the preps. I can't understand how people don't naturally have a least a month on hand. Fifteen hours without a can of soup or a box of crackers in the cabinet is ridiculous.

30 posted on 04/26/2013 5:09:41 PM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill
Personally, I wouldn't have stayed inside. I'm ok with getting arrested. I don't cower well.

/johnny

31 posted on 04/26/2013 5:14:22 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Marcella

No way could I make it on an every day basis in a European kitchen. We’d have to have an extra bedroom for the pantry and storage and I’d be putting every dime toward an American sized fridge and a freezer. Next on the must have list would be a washer and dryer. The first thing we bought when we got married was a washer and dryer and we were both tickled pink. I haven’t had a dishwasher in 15 years. Sure, I could survive without those machines in an emergency, I wouldn’t want to on a daily basis.

Next time you visit them, take them a pressure cooker (will TSA let you?). At least they’d have canned meats and such. The name of the game there should be canned goods and dehydrated foods.


32 posted on 04/26/2013 5:27:07 PM PDT by bgill
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To: Bigg Red

Out at the family farm, we would heat wash buckets of water on the stove to have hot water to wash the dishes and to add to the cold bath water. Clothes washing was done by hand. There was a ringer washer out in the shed but it was too snake-y out there so I’d work the clothes harder in the kitchen sink. Hung them out to dry on the line but I hate stiff line dried clothes. They wrinkle so then more work ironing them. I’m also partial to machine dried fluffy towels. At the river house, we bathed in the river.


33 posted on 04/26/2013 5:39:18 PM PDT by bgill
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To: Mears
The person who had the police officer get the milk is an ass and the officer should have refused

That's the libtard mindset. They took that "public servant" title too far. Mine would be having water, juice, koolaid, tea, coke or frozen milk. The cop should be fired or on parking meter duty for the next year.

34 posted on 04/26/2013 5:46:46 PM PDT by bgill
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To: JRandomFreeper
Personally, I wouldn't have stayed inside

I'd stay inside not because I of orders but because I don't want to be target practice by the bad guys (either side). I have enough to keep myself occupied inside so it wouldn't have mattered - FR, tv, checking preps, clean the house, family time or a nap would be mighty fine. I don't HAVE to go anywhere.

35 posted on 04/26/2013 6:00:16 PM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill; Marcella
This morning a cop slowed down in front of the house, so I went out front and observed. He slowed to almost a stop at the neighbor's place south of me, pulled forward a little and lost his situational awareness in the little computer thingy they have.

When he noticed me. Ahem... He asked what I was doing. I told him a car was cruising slowly down my street (his car) and I was going to find out what in the heck was going on.

I also informed him that the neighbor who was assigned to a wounded warrior battalion after a deployment is now back, and that was the neighbor's car in the neighbor's driveway. (PD Intel had that info, just hadn't briefed it)

His comment was that he should have figured I would have called if something was amiss.

Don't nobody watch my neighborhood like I watch my neighborhood. I even catch the cops with their SA down.

/johnny

36 posted on 04/26/2013 6:08:38 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Last time a cop was out here, he was more interested in the contents of my mailbox than taking my complaint. Excuse me?


37 posted on 04/26/2013 6:34:59 PM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill
The local constabulary know me. Other than my time away in service, and some other time away, being married or avoiding marriage, I've lived here within a few meters of where I was born. The cops that were brats that I threw out of the skating rink when I worked there as a teen have retired now... but they know me.

I probably know this ground better than anyone living.

To paraphrase Gabby Johnson; I was born here. I was raised here. And dad-gum it, I'm gonna die here. an no sidewindin' bushwackin', hornswagglin' cracker croaker is gonna rouin me bishen cutter.

They pretty much leave me alone.

/johnny

38 posted on 04/26/2013 6:46:43 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Mears

I saw an interview with the lady the officer got milk for, she said the officer had been stationed outside her house for hours and I guess they had chatted some. He was told to take an LEO vehicle to get refueled and he asked her if she needed anything at the store since he was going. She had noticed they were down to their last gallon of milk so she asked him to get milk.

I agree she should have had more milk with kids in the house but it wasn’t quite as it seemed. The officer did not make a special trip to get her milk, he was going to the store anyway.


39 posted on 04/26/2013 6:46:58 PM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: Bigg Red; greeneyes; JRandomFreeper; Kartographer; All
“but I can’t imagine living without a washing machine.”

I don't think we have talked about washing clothes in a SHTF situation. My method is this:

To have hot water to wash clothes, put a couple of filled camp showers in the sun to heat up. Once that water is hot, continue:

1. Use dishwashing liquid for the soap. A very small bit makes a huge around of suds. Don't use much ‘cause you have to get the suds out.

2. Use 1/2 of the sink and have a clean plunger for that purpose. Get one now and put it away. Use the plunger to get the soap through the clothes. When you get tired plunging, wring out the clothes and put them in the other half of the sink with water in it.

3. Get the soap off the plunger, and use it to get soap out of the clothes. When you get tired plunging, wring them out and take outside.

4. There are two ways to hang clothes. Buy clothes line and pins at Walmart. String the line between two objects and pin the clothes on there.

4A. I bought a metal extending clothes dryer Christmas tree looking thing. Right now it's folded inside a not big box in the outside storage room. The metal bar in the center fits in the hole in the center of the iron table on the deck where the folding umbrella is right now. Once the bar is in the hole, extend the limbs of the clothes hanger and pin the clothes on all the extending bars. It's a steady and firm way to pin up clothes and they aren't going anywhere on those metal spokes.

That is the end of Clothes Washing 101.

40 posted on 04/26/2013 6:56:47 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Marcella
That ain't the way granny taught me to boil laundry in lye soap. Besides, you forgot to mention that Monday is the traditional laundry day. ;)

/johnny

41 posted on 04/26/2013 7:05:28 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Marcella

A Sustainable Laundry Washer

http://birminghampoint.co/blog/2012/08/09/sustainability/a-high-performance-washer-for-sustainable-laundering/


42 posted on 04/26/2013 7:11:45 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Tammy8

Thanks for that info-—I was not aware of those details.

.


43 posted on 04/26/2013 7:14:08 PM PDT by Mears
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To: JRandomFreeper

So do you now have a regular tub and bathroom or what?


44 posted on 04/26/2013 7:16:31 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
I do have a tub, and there isn't a transmission in it or anything. And a flush toilet. And running water. Cold only. If I want hot water, I heat it. Have for years, now. But not having to carry water in buckets is a GoodThing(tm).

But in the peak of the summer.... after the sun goes down.... there is that 55 gallon drum right outside the back door, and that, after the junebugs are skimmed off, is as good a place for a bath as anywhere. ;)

It recycles the dirt back to the garden.

Besides, the porch steps make a handy place to put the soap and shampoo.

/johnny

45 posted on 04/26/2013 7:24:45 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Kartographer; All
“A Sustainable Laundry Washer”

That is a bigger set up than I would want. Plus, if any of that meant I had to bend over, I'd junk it. I'll use the two kitchen sinks so I don't bend over.

However, the clothes plunger in that picture is a good one to get. It's $14.95 at Amazon. Put “Mobile Washer” or “Rapid Washer” in search at Amazon.

46 posted on 04/26/2013 7:33:29 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Marcella

I’ve used that method too.LOL


47 posted on 04/26/2013 7:35:50 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I would expect no less.LOL


48 posted on 04/26/2013 7:37:16 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
COP: "Are you aware there are a pair of pants on the roof?"

ME: "Yep. They are drying.

COP: "Why?"

ME: "You don't want to know the details. And my lawyer wouldn't want me to say".

/johnny

49 posted on 04/26/2013 7:52:17 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Ha Ha. Gotta remember that response, and practice it till it just comes out automatically.LOL


50 posted on 04/26/2013 7:53:46 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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