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"Alas, Brave New Babylon" new fiction by Matt Bracken
Western Rifle Shooters Association ^ | August 26, 2013 | Matthew Bracken

Posted on 08/26/2013 6:20:36 AM PDT by Travis McGee

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To: Tijeras_Slim

My goal is just to open a door in the imagination of the reader, there are ten questions left hanging and very few are answered. I even left open the “Japanese holdout on Guam” option. This story could go in dozens of directions, but it’s only meant to flash a light on one possible outcome, and give me an excuse to philosophize. The first 2 sections are just dragging the reader up into the broken tower in what I hope is a plausible and entertaining way.


151 posted on 08/26/2013 1:22:24 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Travis McGee

Around 20-25 years ago I was working at a religious retreat in Western North Carolina. I was working with a group called Centrifuge which the kids just love.

The preacher and another leader were maybe 20 years old. They both were in great physical condition, had charismatic personalities etc. One had just come back from Africa where his parents were missionaries and the other from a farm in Indiana.

One day they decided to take a trip to Catawba Falls. It was maybe a ten mile trip. I had been there many times and gave them written directions of which trails to stay on, which turns to make etc. This was in the Pisgah National Forest.

The next day they came in really scratched up, and I mean beat to heck. It turned out they had made it to the falls OK but climbed to the top then coming back got lost. They had a good compass and knew they just had to basically walk straight North. They made it but boy that is rough walking.


152 posted on 08/26/2013 1:24:35 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Travis McGee

bttt


153 posted on 08/26/2013 1:26:55 PM PDT by bmwcyle (People who do not study history are destine to believe really ignorant statements.)
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To: Travis McGee

Thanks for the ping. I enjoyed it immensely.


154 posted on 08/26/2013 1:36:53 PM PDT by Vor Lady
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To: Travis McGee

I just sent it to an email list that has a lot of people, mostly choir members! but they can send it to others as well.

Sadly most non-choire members I’ve sent things to seem to not read them...

They prefer sleeping in dreamland. Maybe I’ll try again with this one - it’s a bucket of cold water on the head.


155 posted on 08/26/2013 2:06:45 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Travis McGee

By the way, good story. Well written and you make several very good points about human nature.

In my earlier note I alluded to an experience I had. The country (Ecuador) actually went through an economic collapse in the late nineties. Their currency failed and they had to shut down the banking system while they figured out what to do. The banks were down a couple of weeks but it was about a month before people started getting paid again.

Accounts were instantly frozen and not returned for a year and a half and then at a fraction of the original value.

So people had to get by with what money they had in their pockets and what food they had in their pantry for about a month. So I usually use that as my mental benchmark for what a banking collapse looks like.

The thing is, people did make it through; neighbors and family pulled together. I remember guys disappearing off the job for a few days to take what money they had home to their wives. It was spooky but people there are used to hard times and it all held together. There wasn’t much more than the usual civil unrest.

Tourists probably didn’t notice. The homesteaders out in the boondocks didn’t notice.

Katrina is my other benchmark. It took about a month for things to get rolling again. Where neighbors pulled together, things seem to have gone passably well. Where they didn’t, it was hell on earth. The police were part of the problem, out of control.

When I think of economic collapse, I usually envision a third world situation after it stabilizes. Different, harder, but livable. The problem is the transition, where people do not yet know how to live, they don’t yet have the familial relations you have to have to survive, they don’t have the practical skills you have to have, and they haven’t yet formed the power hierarchy that fits the new reality. Until that happens, some people go bananas and the rest have to defend themselves from open banditry. Its that in-between between the old system and the new that is most dangerous.

But its remarkable to me the difference between Katrina, where people went crazy, and Ecuador’s complete economic meltdown that didn’t even hardly make the papers here, where people just pulled together and got on with things.


156 posted on 08/26/2013 2:09:46 PM PDT by marron
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To: Travis McGee

The story references the Nantahala Forest; didn’t Eric Rudolph spend several years holed-up there?


157 posted on 08/26/2013 2:13:12 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: yarddog

Very, very rough cross country off of trails. I had to keep it short, so I hinted at trails vs bushwhacking, but city folks really do not understand what it means to walk a mile on a road, a marked trail, and a compass course across constant deadfall. It’s like those civil war wooden barricades, I can’t remember the name, but they bored holes and drove sharpened timber through long planks in a series of X’s. That’s what it’s like, hiking through thick deadfall in a forest. Throw in cliffs, ravines, crevices, rapids, it’s pretty challenging country on foot! “Miles per day” is optimistic in some places. But a slow and careful woodsman can not only cross it (very slowly) but remain unseen at all times. Folks ask me what to do to get ready, I usually say, Find a hunter who wants to teach you how to hunt. Good hunters know what I’m talking about.


158 posted on 08/26/2013 2:13:21 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Travis McGee

Thanks,,,,Food for thought may not be that far off,,,,


159 posted on 08/26/2013 2:14:19 PM PDT by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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To: reformedliberal

I was given Jerusalem artichokes by someone, planted some, tried to cook a batch of them just once.

I had to throw them away, after a few bites. I found them really loathesome. I suppose if I was starving I’d like them, if there was nothing else to eat.


160 posted on 08/26/2013 2:17:49 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Travis McGee
"they don’t yet have the familial relations you have to have to survive, they don’t have the practical skills you have to have, and they haven’t yet formed the power hierarchy that fits the new reality"

Of course, in a collapse as complete as the one you describe, the transition isn't a month, its a generation.

161 posted on 08/26/2013 2:18:27 PM PDT by marron
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To: Travis McGee
In the end, we smote ourselves with our hubris, believing that we were replacing God’s wisdom with our own.

Sheer brilliance.

162 posted on 08/26/2013 2:28:41 PM PDT by wbill
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To: Travis McGee

Wife has kin up in that area of Highlands,horse Cove, They have plans in place for the coming collapse or CWII. Them mountain folks are prepared ,no coming or going from that location.


163 posted on 08/26/2013 2:39:13 PM PDT by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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To: Travis McGee
Bravo Zulu! passed onto my list
164 posted on 08/26/2013 2:47:30 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: marron

Or generations, to get back to some new baseline.


165 posted on 08/26/2013 2:48:00 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Travis McGee; MestaMachine

Thank you, Mr. McGee. {:^)

And, thank you, Mesta Machine


166 posted on 08/26/2013 2:49:22 PM PDT by frog in a pot ("To each according to his need..." -from a guy who never had a real job and couldn't feed his family)
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To: Travis McGee

Enjoyed it very much. Thanks and good job!


167 posted on 08/26/2013 3:04:27 PM PDT by Sirius Lee (All that is required for evil to advance is for government to do "something")
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To: DuncanWaring
The info. below is why potatoes are not grown with these potato seed pods of which you speak. Only occasionally, do these seed pods form on a potato plant and they are poisonous - maybe you won't eat them but someone else could. Also, as you will read, the potato does not breed true using these seeds. Also, to process the seed, it take fuel and time to go through that process. I wouldn't depend on such a hap hazard way to maybe grow a potato. And, if there were other people around, including children, I wouldn't have poisonous seed pods anywhere.

I guarantee you, in a SHTF situation with no food, you will find people digging up those Sunspot sunflower tubers and eating them as they ARE food and called Jerusalem artichokes. They do taste like water chestnuts and that's not a bad taste or people wouldn't eat water chestnuts. It is a nutritious food - since you know where they are, maybe you can make a business of selling them when people are starving.

As far as saving some regular potatoes for the next season, that is easier to do in states that have a genuine cold season to keep the potatoes alive/dormant. It's difficult to keep them until the next season in the south as it is warmer in the south. I grew up in real east Texas and Father could keep some under the house during the winter. Farther south makes it more difficult.

Info. on potato seed from Iowa State University:

"FROM: Iowa State University Horticulture & Home Pest News"

"OCCASIONALLY gardeners are surprised to find small, round, green, tomato-like fruit on their potato plants. These fruit are not the result of cross-pollination with tomatoes. They are the true fruit of the potato plant. The edible tubers are actually enlarged, underground stems. Normally, most potato flowers dry up and fall off the plants without setting fruit. A few flowers do produce fruit. The variety ‘Yukon Gold’ produces fruit more heavily than most varieties.

The potato fruit are of no value to the gardener. Potato fruit, as well as the plant itself, contain relatively large amounts of solanine. Solanine is a poisonous alkaloid. The small fruit should not be eaten. Since potatoes don't come true from seed, no effort should be made to save the seed."

If you ever grow a potato from these seeds you have to process, let me know how that turns out.

168 posted on 08/26/2013 3:09:11 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Travis McGee
Cheval De Frise

An anti-cavalry obstacle made obsolete by barbed wire.

169 posted on 08/26/2013 3:23:21 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: Tijeras_Slim

What you said. That’s pretty much what you encounter bushwhacking cross country in a lot of mountains I’ve been in. It ain’t a walk in the park, following a compass, that is for sure.


170 posted on 08/26/2013 3:25:54 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Tijeras_Slim

What you said. That’s pretty much what you encounter bushwhacking cross country in a lot of mountains I’ve been in. It ain’t a walk in the park, following a compass, that is for sure.


171 posted on 08/26/2013 3:25:54 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: little jeremiah

Exactly what I’ve heard. I sliced off a bit of one tuber and tried it. As I said, sorta like a dirty water chestnut, only drier. IIRC, the Extension even handed out recipes, but only one guy I used to know ever tried them. He said he’d boiled some and sliced and fried some others. He didn’t rave. I heard that farmers who tried to feed them to the cows weren’t successful, either. Supposedly, you could grind and dry them and use them as *flour*.

We have lots of commercial potato and other vegetable farms around here. Also a lot of Amish (who buy their seeds locally at the store). I suspect we would have access to their excess if SHTF. We have lots of seed savers, too. I save some, myself, mostly tomato and red pepper.One tomato and one red pepper provide enough seeds of that variety to plant a home garden. Everyone gardens to some extent.

My favorite SHTF gardening meme is a line in “Jericho”. They are trying to keep a school together and one of the teen boys opts out because:”I have to go home and help my mother plant beets in the bath tub.” As a container gardener, it stuck with me.


172 posted on 08/26/2013 3:43:40 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: DuncanWaring

That is the potato seed pod.


173 posted on 08/26/2013 3:50:16 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Travis McGee

“Foxfire Books” and similar printed literature would be essential to rediscover the timeless old ways to make soap, candles, butter etc.


Current folks do all that, still. There is an entire artisanal subculture, some are just hobbyists, others make a living at it. We have a long-established school out here where folks teach various such crafts and trades.

http://www.driftlessfolkschool.org/

Teachers/students of all ages. My husband was encouraged to present some classes, but the timing has never worked out for him to do so.


174 posted on 08/26/2013 3:59:36 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: yarddog

You aren’t alone, yarddog.

We had a similar incident here during a power outage last winter. Genny doesn’t like the cold, battery starter low on charge, all the other chargers and batteries were low.

My husband brought the generator inside to sit by the woodstove and I can’t recall what he did with the other infrastructure. Perhaps he used one of the vehicles. He had everything up and running within a few hours, though.

We try to stay on top of things, but it is easy to forget and become lax.


175 posted on 08/26/2013 4:08:06 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Marcella

Here’s a simple method:

“Potato

While usually propagated vegetatively, the potato can be grown from seeds which occasionally form on the plants. Let the seed balls mature, then squeeze the seeds into a bowl. Add water and pour off the floating debris, saving the seeds which sink to the bottom. Grow the same as tomato seedlings.

Some of the smaller nightshades, such as cherry and currant tomatoes, tomatillos, ground cherries etc., can be processed in a blender and treated the same as potato seeds. “
http://www.naturallifemagazine.com/9504/seeds.htm

In a SHTF scenario, it probably doesn’t matter if a saved seed breeds true or not. I have saved and planted hybrid tomato seeds and they sprout and bear. Some of the plants breed true, some don’t and bear true to the progenitors, instead.

I suspect the University/Extension article was speaking to commercial farmers. That’s a whole lot different from personal gardening. For example, I have gotten busy and just placed fresh tomato seeds on a paper towel, no fermentation, no washing. They stuck together, so I pried a few off and planted them, indoors, with bottom heat, in the late winter. They sprouted, they grew, they survived transplanting and they bloomed and set fruit. Back in the 1990s, when our local climate was warmer, I had one variety of cherry tomatoes survive a mild winter and volunteer right where I had planted them the previous year. I think the name was Tiny Millions or something like that.

The original wild fruits were managed and planted and eaten by generations of primitive people. It obviously was done in the past and can still be done, today.


176 posted on 08/26/2013 4:30:27 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Travis McGee

Your character and I think alike; don’t rush into the crowd ever, but especially when times are abnormal. Carry optics. Use head before movement.

I think I’ve stayed in that same motel- only the one I was in was in southern VA. I bought an enormous Brit motorcycle in Knoxville and rode toward home in the DC southern suburbs until the need for meds, fatigue and thunderstorm were too much. The fatigue-selected motel was a one-off place run by Indian folks. Half the lights in the room didn’t work, no coffee for the morning, but I was in out of the rain and had a place to switch off for a few hours. Washed the meds down with a Bud and I was out.

I miss the west. Easier to disappear into the mountains and get by there.


177 posted on 08/26/2013 4:38:33 PM PDT by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: Travis McGee
It’s like those civil war wooden barricades, I can’t remember the name, but they bored holes and drove sharpened timber through long planks in a series of X’s.

An Abatis?

-Old blackboot Jarhead sapper history geek

178 posted on 08/26/2013 4:46:44 PM PDT by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: reformedliberal

Yes, becoming complacent is the easiest thing in the world.


179 posted on 08/26/2013 4:47:34 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Travis McGee
Like binary code: one or zero. All or nothing.

Pick your poison. Entertain yourself to death.

Consumer, consume thyself.

pure gold...

180 posted on 08/26/2013 5:00:27 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: reformedliberal
It says: “While usually propagated vegetatively, the potato can be grown from seeds which OCCASIONALLY (my emphasis) form on the plants.”

The problem is “occasionally” and my parents planted potatoes from regular seed potatoes all their adult life and I never saw any plant that developed seed pods.

I'll be growing the White Fuseau Sunflower russet potato like tubers that spread on their own and I'll never be without food and can give others the tubers so they can have a plot of food of their own that never goes away.

I'm also planting Egypt Walking Onions that propagate/spread on their own and I'll never be without onions and can give those away for people to start their own. Potatoes and onions cooked together is a good meal when there is no other food.

The White Fuseau is a special food in England and has been for many years. A start of 4-5 tubers is $6.95 and means food forever after.

Egypt Walking Onions is 10 topsets for $7.00 and is onions forever after.

If anyone wants to know where to get these never ending foods, send me a Freepmail.

181 posted on 08/26/2013 5:18:49 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Travis McGee

I watched “The Road” again a couple of days ago. Those people had nothing and that’s the way it will be after several days here if they haven’t prepare at all, which most haven’t.


182 posted on 08/26/2013 5:29:23 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: little jeremiah

“I had to throw them away, after a few bites.”

The bumpy tubers have little taste on their own. They pick up the seasoning you use and that’s where the taste comes from. You normally butter a potato and it’s the same with these tubers. These tubers give you, for one thing, carbohydrates for energy but it’s carbohydrate that turns into sugar at a low rate which keeps you going and is good for diabetic people.

The smooth tubers, as opposed to the bumpy ones, are more favorable on their own but still need seasoning. They are easier to prepare since they don’t have the bumps on them where dirt could hide. Anyone preparing the bumpy kind needs to take care to clean them well due to the bumps.

In a SHTF situation, if something is food, it is valuable for you and others.


183 posted on 08/26/2013 5:41:59 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Marcella

Mine were the bumpy kind. I’m not normally fussy about vegetables; there was just some kind of unpleasant quality about them, but I’m certainly will to try the smooth kind. It wasn’t the lack of flavor, it was sort of a watery sliminess? An emptiness of flavor?

But as my old mother used to say “Hunger is the best sauce!”


184 posted on 08/26/2013 5:44:22 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Travis McGee

A McGee BTT for a thread that is not, actually, about potatoes.


185 posted on 08/26/2013 5:45:37 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: Marcella

I have spoken to some gardeners who have planted the walking onions. Supposed to be like scallions, but they get hotter tasting. All parts are edible, but the bulbil part stays small. Most people prefer the stalks and leaves, like scallions. They need *direction* or they will take over and even climb into planters, up walls, etc. They can spread 16’/year. They should be thinned and staked so when the top-heaviness causes them to fall to the ground to root, you have some control as to where. They will grow into thick tangles along with the local weeds and the older bulbils get tough and chewy, so should be picked immediately. They have both the top-set bulbils and underground bulbs, which are also small. If they are like other alliums, you will have no trouble finding them because they are strong scented. Actually, they sound a lot like ramps, which is an acquired taste, IMO.

Since we already are overrun w/the Sunchokes, I will rest easy knowing they are there.


186 posted on 08/26/2013 5:46:08 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Riley

I love your description of the generic highway motel! Washin’ the meds down with a Bud...


187 posted on 08/26/2013 5:51:01 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Riley

There is a picture at #169. I won’t try to spell it from memory.


188 posted on 08/26/2013 5:52:52 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Chode

Thanks, I worked on this story for a long time.


189 posted on 08/26/2013 5:53:32 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Marcella

I think that 90% of people will stay at home and wait for the government rescuers to save them.


190 posted on 08/26/2013 5:54:32 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Travis McGee

I’ve on at least one occasion taken a hike through old pine forest that had been neither burned nor logged for at least a half-century, probably more.

It had a lot of trees that were dead and in varying stages of “falling down”; some down and rotted, some level and not on the ground, but too low to easily crawl under, others at an angle such that you had to either duck to get under them, or go out of your way to get around them.

I had a GPS receiver with a waypoint marking where I was going, and it provided a distance and bearing to get there.

However, unless I was moving at least 2 mph, it wouldn’t provide an arrow indicating which direction that bearing was. In that forest, there was nearly impossible to do 2 mph on a consistent basis. I knew generally which way North was, so I could make an educated guess at which direction that bearing was, and I was somewhat familiar with the area so the GPS was really just a backup and I could find my way using landmarks.

(To the assembled multitude:)

EVEN IF YOU HAVE A WORKING GPS RECEIVER AND THE SATELLITES ARE WORKING, YOU NEED TO HAVE A COMPASS, TOO!


191 posted on 08/26/2013 6:04:32 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Billthedrill

I’ll take any kind of a bump I can get, even the potato kind.


192 posted on 08/26/2013 6:11:16 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Travis McGee
and it shows...
193 posted on 08/26/2013 6:16:31 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: reformedliberal; Travis McGee

The Egypt Walking Onions, taste different at different stages. The hotter ones are the ones that have been there longer - near the top. Their name is what they do - they walk. Mine should be here any day and they go in a planter and when they put out the part that falls over to make another onion, I’ll make sure it stays in the planter.

If they are planted in the ground and not in a planter, one would have to limit them and the best way to do that is to put them in a spot made just for them, not in a regular garden for them to take that over and the same is true for the white tubers.

People in McGee’s story have no food. The sunflower tubers/Egypt Walking Onions could keep these people alive, including our hero. If these were growing naturally where he was, he would have meals right there. He may be a macho man but he still has to eat. Six months of MRE type meals in his car won’t help him when he heads into the woods. He can hunt for game but he also has Zombies in the woods to watch for when he hunts.

I need to send McGee the link to the white tubers and Egypt Walking Onions. And, need to send him some Zombie targets (which I have) for him to practice his aim. Actually, we have talked about practicing aim and we both use the same “weapon” to practice.


194 posted on 08/26/2013 6:27:42 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: reformedliberal

I know what it else it was about the chokes I didn’t like - a sort of strange astringency.

But I might try those white smooth ones.


195 posted on 08/26/2013 6:41:47 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: Travis McGee

“I think that 90% of people will stay at home and wait for the government rescuers to save them.”

I believe that is right especially if they have children. Unless they are heading out to grandmother’s house, they will stay home - and die - and if they hesitate to go to grandmother’s house, they will never get there.

I wish I could speak to every person not prepared in this country. It weighs on me more with every passing day. If they all read the articles I wrote, they could save themselves but they don’t know those are there and if they are sure nothing is going to happen, they wouldn’t read them anyway. I saw/read several days ago that 3% of the population had anything stored.

If you recall an article posted in the last few days, the US government is going to have a training day in November to simulate what will happen if an enemy explodes a nuclear device in the air and brings down the entire country grid. Companies and police across the country will participate. The article said they would assume all deliveries of food and medicine and medical care stops. That will be an eye opener if the results are publicized.

But, guess what? We paid for the most expensive bunker in the US with water and food and sterile air and even a surgeon. We paid for Muslim Hussein and family to go underground, across the street and down, and enter “our” bunker. Are you and everyone else as important as Hussein? I am and spent my own money after paying for his, for me to have something to depend on in a perilous time just as you wrote about. Thank you for writing and I’m sending it to my friends.


196 posted on 08/26/2013 6:44:55 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Marcella

When I was a kid near DeFuniak Springs, FL, wild onions were fairly common, especially in areas which had been cut over such as large lawns, highway right of way etc. The bulbs were only a little larger than a marble with the largest ones probably smaller than a ping pong ball.

They tasted about the same ass the ones you bought in stores except it took a lot of them. The stalks were also pretty good when cooked. The closer to the bulb, the better the stalks.

I now live only around 20 miles from there but I don’t see any around here.

In my yard are pear trees, a bunch of pecan trees, Japanese persimmons (very tasty), figs, plums, apples, and very heavy producing wild grapes (scuppernongs). There are also a couple of satsuma bushes which produce nearly year round.

With just a few other things I think I could live off what my yard produces. The pecan trees only make about every other year but there are over a dozen of them. I think I would like to plant some of those Egyptian onions if they are so prolific.


197 posted on 08/26/2013 6:47:28 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Travis McGee

Bkmrk


198 posted on 08/26/2013 7:09:58 PM PDT by 2111USMC (Aim Small Miss Small)
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To: yarddog

I sent you a Freepmail with the link to Egyptian Walking Onions.


199 posted on 08/26/2013 7:14:28 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Marcella

Yes, I got it. there is a large feed and seed store near me and I will check there first. If they don’t have them or something which will grow here I will order some.


200 posted on 08/26/2013 7:17:44 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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