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History of the Super Bowl: Just another Religious Holiday?
billpetro.com ^ | January 30, 2014 | Bill Petro

Posted on 01/30/2014 2:04:02 PM PST by NYer

Super BowlHISTORY OF THE SUPER BOWL The Super Bowl, also known as simply Superbowl — a territory acquisition athletic contest played upon a fixed agrarian grid using as a token an inflated porcine prolate spheroid — is the most important holiday of the year in America. Some will say that it is a secular holiday, others argue that it is truly a religious holiday. And there are many reasons why: it has a liturgy, lots of prayer, rituals, and indeed these rituals have changed throughout history. For example, it used to be that commercials were the part of the service that was intended for taking a bio break, but not in recent years. The commercials are now the most important part (for some) of the service, and indeed some (like me) watch Superbowl specifically for the advertisements. Google observes that those companies that post their ads on YouTube before the game received 3.4 times more views last year than those who didn’t.

After Thanksgiving Day, more food is consumed on Super Bowl Sunday than any other day of the year. These are usually selected for their high caloric index, sodium content, and crunch factor — along with carbonated inebriating fluids.

Not only is food a major part of this holiday, so too are decorations. Consider Supermarkets (named after Superbowl) which decorate the chips aisle as it if is Christmas. If you work for Frito-Lay, it is Christmas.

Advertisers will pay up to $100,000 per second for an advert. A 30-second commercial will go for $3.8M and most slots have been sold out since the beginning of last summer. Who can forget the premier of Apple Macintosh *, directed by Ridley Scott (who directed Gladiator and Prometheus), during the 1984 Super Bowl, when the ad closed with:

On January 24th, Apple Computer will introduce Macintosh.

And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like “1984.”

Super Bowl is the modern name, since 1967, for the professional football championship contests, which extend back into antiquity, Roman antiquity to be precise. This will be Super Bowl XLVIII, the Roman numerals for 47 to honor those Roman roots of gladiatorial contests. This contest is between the conferences of the National Football League (NFL), so named for the “League” the unit of measurement used to express the distance a Roman citizen could walk in 1 hour. The modern game, however, is about 4 times that length of time. The NFL is divided neatly into two unequal halves, the NFC (National Football Conference) and the AFC (American Football Conference), these are each further subdivided into Meetings, Get-Togethers, and One-On-Ones. The Super Bowl will not involve the ICFL (Continental Indoor Footfall League) as it is not a TLA (Three Letter Acronym). The winner of the Super Bowl will be declared the “world champions of football,” of course ignoring other inhabited countries who may point out that they call soccer “football,” and they have a championship involving not a bowl, but a cup. And involvement from teams from outer space is out of the question. For space action we’ll have to just wait for the next Star Trek movie. Where does the word “bowl” come from? Originally, it comes from the Rose Bowl, a college football contest, played in Pasadena, CA which is done in an elliptical stadium. Now a stadium is where foot races were held in ancient Rome, but spectator gladiatorial contests like this were held in amphitheaters, like the Colosseum in Rome, or Flavian Amphitheater, so named from the ancient Greek word because they were made up of two theaters joined together or theaters on both sides, but that is more ancient history than most people can handle.

Nominally named for being approximately in the middle of the game, or 2 quarters in, or 4 bits worth, or 50 cent, but not the singer. Unlike many other football broadcasts, this part is actually shown to the audience watching from home. These festivities consist of first-class and second-rate musical performers, some who have questionable taste in attire, others who have costuming clumsiness or so called “wardrobe malfunctions.”

Super Bowl, while using a clock, does not intend that this is to be understood as representing actual “wall clock” time, rather, it uses poetic license to represent an epochal period that could last 30 minutes or an hour and a half, given overtimes.

There is one reason for celebrating at the end of Super Bowl, especially for “football widows” or “football widowers” like me. It means the end of the professional football season for the year! Bill Petro, your friendly neighborhood historian www.billpetro.com * This was not the very first airing of that famous commercial. It had been shown just before midnight on December 31, 1983 on KMVT-TV in Twin Falls, Idaho in order to be eligible for that year’s advertising awards.



TOPICS: Food; History; Society; Sports
KEYWORDS: culture; holiday; humor

1 posted on 01/30/2014 2:04:02 PM PST by NYer
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To: Tax-chick; GregB; Berlin_Freeper; SumProVita; narses; bboop; SevenofNine; Ronaldus Magnus; tiki; ...

Enjoy the humor, ping!


2 posted on 01/30/2014 2:04:27 PM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: NYer

Superbowl Sunday is the saddest day of the year for me.

The worst NFL game is better than the best any other sport.


3 posted on 01/30/2014 2:08:21 PM PST by freedumb2003 (Fight Tapinophobia in all its forms! Do not submit to arduus privilege.)
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To: NYer

Praise hogs from whom all pigskin footballs flow for touch down here and at 10 below.

Don’t worry I won’t be setting before the football alter on superbowl sunday, especially since the Chicago Bears aren’t playing


4 posted on 01/30/2014 2:08:28 PM PST by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: NYer

Oh, right - a sporting event. Maybe we’ll watch “Ben-Hur” Sunday evening. I just read the book, so it will be fun to irritate the family by pointing out all the differences.


5 posted on 01/30/2014 2:08:42 PM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: NYer

This Superbowl should be entertaining, but sometimes it all goes horribly wrong, and ends up being an utter bore. I’m picking Seattle to win, which probably means that Denver will annihilate them.


6 posted on 01/30/2014 2:10:29 PM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: freedumb2003

Agreed! I do get into March Madness a bit, but I pine for the Boys of Fall.


7 posted on 01/30/2014 2:12:55 PM PST by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: Tax-chick

Drives my husband nuts when I do that. :)


8 posted on 01/30/2014 2:21:45 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

My husband is used to it, but the teenagers will all yell “Shut up!” until I make them leave. (I think they all have hearing damage from playing loud music in their headphones.)


9 posted on 01/30/2014 2:23:03 PM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: NYer

Georgia native here. In the South, football and religion are synonymous.


10 posted on 01/30/2014 2:23:50 PM PST by real saxophonist
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear; Tax-chick
Drives my husband nuts when I do that. :)

My wife has gotten used to it and is almost surprised when I don't.

11 posted on 01/30/2014 2:40:03 PM PST by verga (Poor spiritual health often leads to poor physical and mental health)
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To: verga; Harmless Teddy Bear

I’ve never carried on about “Ben-Hur” before, because I hadn’t read the book. But I’ve always been impossible during “The Ten Commandments.”


12 posted on 01/30/2014 2:41:59 PM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: NYer

I prefer the Stanley Cup finals.....


13 posted on 01/30/2014 2:42:59 PM PST by jeffc (The U.S. media are our enemy)
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To: NYer
Check this out.

DEAF NFL STAR GIVES DEAF TWINS SUPER BOWL TICKETS

Seattle Seahawks' fullback Derrick Colema & Duracell Batteries!

Duracell: Trust Your Power - NFL's Derrick Coleman, Seattle Seahawks

14 posted on 01/30/2014 2:51:05 PM PST by TexasCajun
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To: Tax-chick

You could also delve into Lew Wallace’s role in the battle of Shiloh.


15 posted on 01/30/2014 2:59:38 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

I’ll check the library for a biography. I knew he was territorial governor of New Mexico and a bit player in the Billy the Kid legend. I checked out “Ben-Hur” because it was mentioned on a thread about some weirdness in New Mexico ;-).

Btw, for anyone reading this, it’s a very good novel, if you don’t mind religious and philosophical discursions amidst your action scenes. Maybe Gen. Wallace had learned in the Army to keep a narrative moving along, because it took me much less mental adjustment to get into it than most 19th century novels.


16 posted on 01/30/2014 3:05:05 PM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: Tax-chick

Gen. Wallace was made the scapegoat for the heavy Union casualties on the first day of the battle. If you Google “Lew Wallace Shiloh” the first items that should come up are the Wikipedia biography of Wallace and the National Park Service account, for a quick introduction to the controversy.


17 posted on 01/30/2014 3:35:20 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

Thanks, I’ll look at it later. (2-year-old is yelling, “Bath, Mama!”) When I think of Shiloh, I think of Albert Sidney Johnson, not the Union side!


18 posted on 01/30/2014 3:37:04 PM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: trisham

“...which probably means that Denver will annihilate them.”

Hope so! :)


19 posted on 01/30/2014 3:43:52 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders)
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To: GGpaX4DumpedTea

:)


20 posted on 01/30/2014 3:44:46 PM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: TexasCajun
I looked all over for a Coleman Jersey, but could not find one for under 95.00

He is one classy guy and a darn good role model for young deaf kids.

21 posted on 01/30/2014 3:54:11 PM PST by verga (Poor spiritual health often leads to poor physical and mental health)
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To: NYer

I keep waiting for Oblather to come out and declare Superbowl Sunday a national day of service. :-)


22 posted on 01/30/2014 4:03:08 PM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: Tax-chick
There was a book called “Lew Wallace: Boy Writer” that is part of the Childhood of Famous Americans series. The chickadees might enjoy it.
23 posted on 01/30/2014 6:37:51 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Thanks. That might be in the used book store.


24 posted on 01/31/2014 2:46:29 AM PST by Tax-chick (... for the good of all of us, except the ones who are dead ...)
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To: NYer

glad it’s over, hope it never comes to jersey again.


25 posted on 02/02/2014 6:54:14 PM PST by Coleus
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