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Growing Money in the Backyard
Virginia Free Citizen ^ | May 10, 2014 | Jeff Bayard

Posted on 05/10/2014 6:09:10 PM PDT by RightSideNews

This is my story on how you can cut down your grocery bill while improving your diet. It’s called intensive organic vegetable gardening and it’s like growing money in the backyard.My wife and I completed our organic certification course last year at the University of Richmond’s School of Professional and Continuing Studies. We decided to take this course so we could eat healthier and reduce our grocery bill. This has been a fun project and we look forward to growing our own vegetables, or as I like to call it: growing money in the backyard!

(Excerpt) Read more at virginiafreecitizen.com ...


TOPICS: Agriculture; Food; Gardening; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: backyardgarden; healthyfood; organicgardening

1 posted on 05/10/2014 6:09:10 PM PDT by RightSideNews
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To: RightSideNews

I am considering planting some things like choke cherries and fruit trees in my backyard.


2 posted on 05/10/2014 6:16:08 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: RightSideNews

We are avid gardeners but this article made me realize that I don’t have the organic certification course... at the University of Richmond’s School of Professional and Continuing Studies. I feel so ignorant.


3 posted on 05/10/2014 6:20:54 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: RightSideNews

Unless you live in a state with no frost, you’ll need to do a lot of canning to have those vegetables year round.


4 posted on 05/10/2014 6:25:57 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: wideawake

Brining/pickling should work too.


5 posted on 05/10/2014 6:27:55 PM PDT by Argus
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To: RightSideNews

6 posted on 05/10/2014 6:51:36 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (WoT News: Rantburg.com)
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To: RightSideNews

Ping for later. Thanks.


7 posted on 05/10/2014 6:53:55 PM PDT by moovova
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To: RightSideNews

I little Miracle Grow doesn’t hurt either....


8 posted on 05/10/2014 7:09:27 PM PDT by Ouderkirk (To the left, everything must evidence that this or that strand of leftist theory is true)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Yeah..that’s nice. Wonder how well it works when it’s 5 degrees Fahrenheit with clouds everyday for two months.


9 posted on 05/10/2014 7:11:52 PM PDT by Ouderkirk (To the left, everything must evidence that this or that strand of leftist theory is true)
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To: gorush

It’s so cute when rabid libs try to tell me how to do something my family has done for generations due to liberal policies.


10 posted on 05/10/2014 7:18:10 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: RightSideNews
On the one hand, I appreciate stories such as this because I would like to grow a nice garden with lots of fresh fruits and veggies. On the other hand, they all seem to devolve into another tale of how you need to take months and even years of college courses for you to be successful at it. Some of us are just too disabled to travel very far to take any classes, not to mention being too poor to afford Higher-Education instruction.

I wish someone would set up a website where articles and instructions for example could be presented for general useage so that everyone might be able to do such things. Especially help for different people in different climates, instead of assuming that everyone lives in the middle of a large area of fertile and freely available land.

The closest I have come to is the Geoff Lawton series, as long as you can get past his almost hippie-esque attitude. He at least presents vids that show possibilities for differing climates with already-done examples. What I am looking for though is more specific instructions as well as help from others who have already had experience with similar climates of people who are trying to successfully grow things as well.

11 posted on 05/10/2014 7:20:10 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: RightSideNews

I first heard of “intensive gardening” in 1975.

The recipe was simple. Dig down one foot. Throw in coffee grounds and eggshells. Plant stuff.


12 posted on 05/10/2014 7:25:58 PM PDT by Arthur McGowan
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Seems cute. Won’t last long here with the strong winds and three-foot snowfalls we get every year.


13 posted on 05/10/2014 7:26:37 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

Start out with patio tomatoes grown in containers and learn your way through that. If your soil isn’t a good, rich soil it can be corrected with some sphagnum peat and Black Cow, both cheap at any home center such as Lowe’s. Keep the soil from drying out completely down beneath the surface, but don’t overwater either, you’ll drown the plant. Container needs drainage to help prevent this.

There are certain pests that bother certain plants. Tomato sornworms, etc., wear gloves and pick those off. Ladybugs eat most garden pests as do praying mantis. Wiping the plant with warm slightly soapy water will kill aphids without use of pesticide.

Branch out from there next year. You’ll probably kill one or two of the plants your first go if you’ve never done it. But, it’s not rocket science.


14 posted on 05/10/2014 7:28:53 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

should be tomato hornworms.


15 posted on 05/10/2014 7:30:39 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Ouderkirk

“Wonder how well it works when it’s 5 degrees Fahrenheit with clouds everyday for two months”

We had worse than that and still we have a bumper crop of garlic, which we planted in September; strawberries, a perennial; and asparagus, which come up like weeds.

the trick was to cover everything with at least a foot of straw mulch... the first nice weather we had, those shoots were pushing through the top of the mulch like they couldn’t weight to get out...

our locale - just south of the cheddar curtain.

Lurking’


16 posted on 05/10/2014 7:35:09 PM PDT by LurkingSince'98 (Ad Majoram Dei Gloriam = FOR THE GREATER GLORY OF GOD)
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To: RightSideNews

I think there’s a lot of wiggle room between full organic and the Monster of Monsanto.

A little MiracleGro now and then does not make food inedible, IMHO. I’ll use compost and “friendly” bugs as much as possible, and my resident toad is an honored guest in my garden, but I’m not shy about using a fungicide when powdery mildew appears, or a pinch of magic dust to knock down a bad infestation of assorted flying pests.

Organic is nice. Yup, it sure is. But the bugs do not win. Ever.


17 posted on 05/10/2014 7:40:51 PM PDT by DNME (This is the government our Founders warned us about.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Thanks for that Simple Greenhouse info! That really helps me ALOT, as most solutions costs lots of money.


18 posted on 05/10/2014 7:50:10 PM PDT by RightSideNews ( Capitulating to terrorism has never worked. And never will.)
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To: Ouderkirk

In a situation like that I would first think to heavily insulate the greenhouse, then pump in some “waste heat” from the residence, and use plant lights for light only, not heat.

The primary source of waste heat is likely the clothes dryer, but you would need a more constant source.


19 posted on 05/10/2014 7:51:20 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (WoT News: Rantburg.com)
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To: Utilizer
Check out www.gardenweb.com. It's like FreeRepublic for gardeners. VERY friendly and helpful people will answer all your questions. You can usually find an existing thread about the problem you've got in your region, too.
20 posted on 05/10/2014 7:58:42 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: RegulatorCountry

Thanks for the advice. It’s a little late in the year to plant new tomatos, but if I’m lucky I might be able to find a couple of pre-started plants still left at the local store. Tried growing tomatos many times in past years and they never managed to produce any edible tomatos before the fall frosts arrived and killed them so I grew disappointed. I will look out for the products you mentioned and try them.


21 posted on 05/10/2014 8:01:09 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

Tomatoes like full sun, heat and humidity. If your climate is dry mist them after the sun’s off of them. If you’re determined and are just dealing with potted tomatoes, get some Peter’s Special or other liquid fertilizer.

Squirrels go after ripening tomatoes in some areas, so will some turtles. Deer don’t, not in my experience. Tomato cage helps with that to some extent, also helps support the plant when heavy with tomatoes.


22 posted on 05/10/2014 8:07:19 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Utilizer
Try a quick maturing tomato like this:

http://www.rareseeds.com/sub-arctic-plenty-or-world-s-earliest-tomato/

The store tomatoes are generally not suited to be grown in the north.

Keep in mind that tomatoes have a maturity time before they will set fruit. The date on most packages are from the time you set them out.

23 posted on 05/10/2014 8:11:11 PM PDT by jimpick
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Interesting website. I’ll set aside some time later and take a closer look at it to see what I can find. Thank you!


24 posted on 05/10/2014 8:18:37 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: RegulatorCountry
Well, it's not too dry here. I live in the mountains above 2000 feet, so not very humid either. What I most have to deal with are the short growing season and temperature swings.

Most days average about a 40 degree swing, which means it can be 74 in the middle of the day (Hawaii normal) and drop down to 34 overnight, with 50 degree swings not uncommon. We do not really get past the danger of freezing water pipes until late April and get back to it by early October. Most of the tomato plants I tried managed to produce a few small tomatos, but the ripest never got to more than beginning to turn red before then turning yellow and the plant already dying.

Squirrels have not been a problem, mostly because there are quite a few neighborhood cats always about, but at least one neighbor had something come through and take a large bite out of a green tomato so probably deer are the greatest threat.

I will consider a tomato cage, thanks.

25 posted on 05/10/2014 8:40:55 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: jimpick
Ooh, nice suggestion on the sub-artic variation. I'll look into it for next year, thanks.

You may be right about the store-bought tomatos. I have tried all four varieties and so far have had no success.

26 posted on 05/10/2014 8:43:21 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: LurkingSince'98

What if you ran a little plastic pipe under the ground, with some of the black portion above ground, all sealed, and let the sun slowly move warmer water through the pipes, just a sealed, passive system.


27 posted on 05/10/2014 8:49:10 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Utilizer
If you want to save money buy their bulk seeds. Trade with friends and store the extras in the refrigerator for next year and years after that. Some seeds last longer than others so google how long they will last like this.

You can buy 300 lettuce seeds for 2.25 dollars or 17,000 for 5 dollars. Lettuce seeds will last several years in the fridge and are good in cooler regions like yours. I like this lettuce seed here:

http://www.rareseeds.com/little-gem-lettuce/

28 posted on 05/10/2014 8:52:49 PM PDT by jimpick
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To: Utilizer

Sounds like some sort of heat sump nearby would help. A heat sump can be as simple as planting beside a south facing stone/brick/cinderblock wall.

A simple “greenhouse” of clear plastic stretched over thin PVC piping and then placing milk jugs inside in the sun, filled with water and painted black to better absorb and retain heat (which will be released overnight, heat sump), will keep the inside of the expedient greenhouse considerably warmer. There are fairly inexpensive plastic prefab mini-greenhouses available from garden catalogs and websites too, if you’re just not that handy.

If your house is masonry and has a good sunny southern exposure consider a foundation bed for tomatoes there.


29 posted on 05/10/2014 8:57:02 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: moovova

dittos on the ping for later.


30 posted on 05/10/2014 9:05:07 PM PDT by pollywog ("O Thou who changest not, abide with me.".......)
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To: Arthur McGowan

lolol... love it! that’s my kind of gardening too! Except I use tea grounds with my coffee..


31 posted on 05/10/2014 9:07:40 PM PDT by pollywog ("O Thou who changest not, abide with me.".......)
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To: RightSideNews

Here in North Idaho there isn’t a long growing season. My place in Hawaii things get rotten easy.

I found a book called “Square Foot Gardening” at the thrift store. I highly suggest this method. It works great and can be planned out to maximize yield. The small 4x4 beds are easy to protect and maintain.


32 posted on 05/10/2014 9:12:08 PM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: jimpick
Hmmm. Something to think about. I think I will just stick with the small quantities at first until I find out which varieties will succeed here, as I have had little luck in the past.

The lettuce looks interesting as well, However I need to build a planter box or three before I can expand much so again something to consider for next year. Thanks.

33 posted on 05/10/2014 9:31:12 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer

I have done intensive organic gardening for years. Only takes a plot of land roughly 20 x 15. Contact your local county ag agent or as I did the U. of Ky many years ago. UK offered a calculator that once you fed in the type of veggies you wanted to grow you got a estimated cash value of your efforts.
When you set up your garden produce the higher priced veggies so you can save the most money. Make your garden almost maintenance free with the use of black landscape material that keeps the weeds from germinating, plant your rows close to together and use boards to walk on. Green beans are easy to do by buying if you can find them in your area tobacco sticks. Take two sticks cross them at the top take two more cross them at the top and stick them in the ground lay on a cross bar and then tie strings to the cross bars and then use twigs as stakes. The beans will climb the strings and tobacco sticks and you end up with a wall of beans over waist high instead staying bent over to pick them. I have a bad back so this helps. Electric ties to hook together the cross bars and x’s you have formed work well as will string or pieces of cloth.
Something else I used was cattle fencing for cucumbers, just mound your cucumbers as you normally would and make a cylinder a couple of feet across, cut the cross wire at the bottom to secure the cylinder in the ground around the plant, tie two tobacco sticks to the column after driving the sticks in the ground and cut out an occasional square here and there in your column so it is easier to harvest the cucumbers. You then have a column of cucumbers instead of them taking a bunch of space on the ground and being vulnerable to being unseen by you and stepped on or something getting to them. The cucs will hang as they climb the column and there is much less bending over this way.
Run a water hose and attach a couple of sprinklers down the middle of your garden for dry days. Turn the hose on for 45 minutes and don’t worry about.
Use heirloom tomatoes as the skin is thinner and they are much better tasting tomatoes.
I could tell you other things you can do but that would take the fun out of it. The amount you can grow is only limited by your imagination. I did not go to school for this stuff it is just common sense.
I am basically a lazy person though I find gardening relaxing I have limited time and so I always look at my jobs and figure out how to do it with least effort. I raised a 40x20 garden and fed the whole neighborhood, no one was growing anything till I showed up, now they all are. Another way is box or terrace gardening if you have limited space. Purely organic gardening is tough unless you have knowledge of natural pest control. I know a little but a bag of seven dust goes a long way. There is tons of materials on the net and a zillion books on this subject. Just go to the college bookstore near you that offers the courses and buy the study materials. Cheaper and less time consuming than college.


34 posted on 05/10/2014 10:22:33 PM PDT by Foundahardheadedwoman (God don't have a statute of limitations)
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To: RightSideNews

Bookmark


35 posted on 05/10/2014 10:59:47 PM PDT by aquila48
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To: Utilizer
Go to You Tube there are videos by the hundreds on gardening.

I don't garden but am interested in starting a upright, self-watering, soda bottle garden in my condo. Just today, I reviewed several videos on how to do this.

Certification from a university? Really? My grandparents would have a good laugh at that.

36 posted on 05/10/2014 11:08:14 PM PDT by wintertime
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To: Utilizer

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3154134/posts

Weekly Gardening Tread, a regular Freeper feature for several years, with a LOT of members, at all skill levels, from newbie to professional, and all willing to help.


37 posted on 05/10/2014 11:49:26 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: Utilizer

Liked your posting.

Why don’t these “genuises” of gardening ever publish anything about how people lived during WW II, when we were growing all types of fruits and vegetables in our Victory Gardens? Soil preparation, drainage, bone meal, etc., worked well then.

Every house on my street had a garden, but folks would grow different types of food so that it could be shared and swapped with neighbors. Women would gather at different times at each others’ houses to help can the food.

As a young kid, I recall taking the egg shells and coffee grounds to spread around various plants in the garden. I also worked in the plantings and harvests. We had peaches, plums, apples, grapes, figs, cherries, straw/black/raspberries, onions, tomatoes, carrots, turnips, etc. We shared with neighbors who grew corn, potatoes, etc.

Gardening is not a mysterious science.


38 posted on 05/11/2014 4:23:56 AM PDT by octex
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To: Ouderkirk; LurkingSince'98; yefragetuwrabrumuy

> “Yeah..that’s nice. Wonder how well it works when it’s 5 degrees Fahrenheit with clouds everyday for two months.”

Works pretty daggum well!

http://www.bchothouse.com/grower-vandermeulen.html


39 posted on 05/11/2014 5:28:20 AM PDT by Hostage (ARTICLE V)
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To: Ouderkirk

But not organic


40 posted on 05/11/2014 5:30:06 AM PDT by AppyPappy
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To: ansel12

That may work but the cost would be considerable.

With the amount of mulch (1 foot) and two feet of snow most of this winter, I reckon it never got below freezing in the root zone.

Next year we plan to measure temperature in the root zone to see how warm it stays.

Regards
Lurking’


41 posted on 05/11/2014 8:06:04 AM PDT by LurkingSince'98 (Ad Majoram Dei Gloriam = FOR THE GREATER GLORY OF GOD)
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