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For the Boys of Pointe du Hoc
6/6/2014 | andy58-in-nh

Posted on 06/06/2014 8:48:16 PM PDT by andy58-in-nh

For the Boys of Pointe du Hoc

Wide white cliffs arose before us
In the smoke and bleak of dawn,
Steel shells raining death down on
The beaches where we died.

Into the fast and foreign swells
We swept our souls and kept
Our faith with those left far behind
The day our worlds fled time.

While they who ventured on and climbed
And beat against the shores
Would carry forth our names as if
They'd always been their own.

The sand, once soiled by life exposed
The sea, its secrets bared
Now rest the same in soft repose
As we now, on the shore.

God bless you all.
AK
6/6/2014


TOPICS: History; Poetry
KEYWORDS: dday; june6; military; wwii

1 posted on 06/06/2014 8:48:17 PM PDT by andy58-in-nh
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To: andy58-in-nh

Beautiful, just beautiful. <3


2 posted on 06/06/2014 8:52:49 PM PDT by To Hell With Poverty (Ephesians 6:12 becomes more real to me with each news cycle.)
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To: andy58-in-nh

Great tribute. Thanks. Just saw the History Channel show on this, I was just awestruck and riveted. God bless these men.


3 posted on 06/06/2014 8:56:19 PM PDT by Thorliveshere (Minnesota Survivor)
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To: andy58-in-nh

Andy: did you write this? Thanks for sharing...


4 posted on 06/06/2014 9:05:28 PM PDT by Mountain Mary ("Where Liberty Dwells, There Is My Country". Ben Franklin)
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To: Mountain Mary

It’s absolutely beautiful~~~~


5 posted on 06/06/2014 9:09:37 PM PDT by Mountain Mary ("Where Liberty Dwells, There Is My Country". Ben Franklin)
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To: Mountain Mary
Andy: did you write this? Thanks for sharing...

Yes, I did. I just wished to offer something for the men I once knew, and who rarely spoke at all about their bravery, who are now all gone.

6 posted on 06/06/2014 9:10:01 PM PDT by andy58-in-nh (Cogito, ergo armatum sum.)
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To: andy58-in-nh
When I was but a lad (late 1970’s) I worked at a university. One of the security guards was a very fat, white-haired older fellow. Some of the younger guards made fun of him. He didn't say much in return.

Then one day he brought a polished wooden case to work. It was a presentation case, filled with medals. He was a Ranger at Pointe du Hoc. No one made fun of him after that.

The old fellow has since passed on. But I think of him every June 6.

7 posted on 06/06/2014 9:30:19 PM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I holding this lantern? I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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To: andy58-in-nh
There's a new book out I'm waiting for at the library - "The Cover-Up at Omaha Beach - D-Day, The US Rangers, and the Untold Story Of Maisy Battery". (By Gary Sterne)

I started to try to explain it, but it's easier to just cut and paste the synopsis:

The Rangers' mission was clear. They were to lead the assault on Omaha Beach and break out inland. Simultaneously, other Ranger units would scale the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc to destroy the ostensibly huge gun battery there and thus protect the invasion fleet from being targeted. But was the Pointe du Hoc mission actually necessary? Why did the Allies plan and execute an attack on a gun battery that they knew in advance contained no field guns? And more importantly, why did they ignore the position at Maisy that did? Using personal interviews with the surviving Rangers who fought on the beach and at Pointe du Hoc, The Cover-Up at Omaha Beach presents exceptionally detailed new research that takes the reader into the middle of the action with the Rangers. Gary Sterne has made a painstaking study of what the Allies actually knew in advance of D-Day, including what was known about Maisy Battery. Maps, orders, and assault plans have been found in US, UK, and German archives, many of which have only been recently released after having been classified for more than sixty years. Radio communications of the Rangers as they advanced inland have been found, and Royal Air Force intelligence evaluations of bombing missions directed at the site have now been released. All these combine to make The Cover-Up at Omaha Beach one of the most up-to-date references on the subject.

I believe it took the rangers another 3 days or so to take the Maisy battery, (with more heavy casualties.) I saw it somewhere on a D-Day documentary. It was a giant massive battery that military intelligence initially overlooked and then totally covered up (thus hiding more Ranger sacrifices that were required to take it).

8 posted on 06/06/2014 9:44:42 PM PDT by Slump Tester (What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh -Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
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To: Slump Tester

bump.


9 posted on 06/06/2014 9:53:24 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: andy58-in-nh
A kind of interesting, short D-Day blog that shows just how big the battle was that day. Never forget.
10 posted on 06/06/2014 9:56:06 PM PDT by JimSEA
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To: andy58-in-nh

Oh Andy....such a tribute.(I’ve favorited it)...what a poignant poet you are.


11 posted on 06/07/2014 6:34:23 AM PDT by Mountain Mary ("Where Liberty Dwells, There Is My Country". Ben Franklin)
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