Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

PATRIOTIC HOLLYWOOD STARS OF YESTERYEAR - GREATEST GENERATION
Private Email | NOVEMBER 20, 2004 | UNKNOWN

Posted on 11/30/2004 3:47:50 PM PST by CHARLITE

In contrast to the ideals, opinions and feelings of today's "Hollywonk" the real actors of yester-year loved the United States.

They had both class and integrity. With the advent of World War II many of our actors went to fight rather than stand and rant against this country we all love.

They gave up their wealth, position and fame to become service men & women, many as simple "enlisted men".

This page lists but a few, but from this group of only 18 men came over 70 medals in honor of their valor, spanning from Bronze Stars, Silver Stars, Distinguish Service Cross', Purple Hearts and one Congressional Medal of Honor.

So remember; while the "Entertainers of 2004" have been in all of the news media lately I would like to remind the people of what the entertainers of 1943 were doing, (60 years ago).

Most of these brave men have since passed on.

Real Hollywood Heroes

Alec Guinness (Star Wars) operated a British Royal Navy landing craft on D-Day.

James Doohan ("Scotty" on Star Trek) landed in Normandy with the U. S. Army on D-Day.

Donald Pleasance (The Great Escape) really was an R. A. F. pilot who was shot down, held prisoner and tortured by the Germans.

[Unable to display image] David Niven was a Sandhurst graduate and Lt. Colonel of the British Commandos in Normandy.

James Stewart Entered the Army Air Force as a private and worked his way to the rank of Colonel.

During World War II, Stewart served as a bomber pilot, his service record crediting him with leading more than 20 missions over Germany, and taking part in hundreds of air strikes during his tour of duty.

Stewart earned the Air Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross, France's Croix de Guerre, and 7 Battle Stars during World War II.

In peace time, Stewart continued to be an active member of the Air Force as a reservist, reaching the rank of Brigadier General before retiring in the late 1950s.

Clark Gable (Mega-Movie Star when war broke out) Although he was beyond the draft age at the time the U.S. entered WW II,

Clark Gable enlisted as a private in the AAF on Aug. 12, 1942 at Los Angeles.

He attended the Officers' CandidateSchool at Miami Beach, Fla. and graduated as a second lieutenant on Oct. 28, 1942.

He then attended aerial gunnery school and in Feb. 1943 he was assigned to the 351st Bomb Group at Polebrook where flew operational missions over Europe in B-17s.

Capt. Gable returned to the U.S. in Oct. 1943 and was relieved from active duty as a major on Jun. 12, 1944 at his own request, since he was over-age for combat.

[Unable to display image]

Charlton Heston was an Army Air Corps Sergeant in Kodiak.

Earnest Borgnine was a U. S. Navy Gunners Mate 1935-1945.

Charles Durning was a U. S. Army Ranger at Normandy earning a Silver Star and awarded the Purple Heart.

George C. Scott was a decorated U.S. Marine.

Eddie Albert (Green Acres TV) was awarded a Bronze Star for his heroic action as a U. S. Naval officer aiding Marines at the horrific battle on the island of Tarawa in the Pacific Nov. 1943.

[Unable to display image]

Brian Keith served as a U.S. Marine rear gunner in several actions against the Japanese on Rabal in the Pacific.

[Unable to display image]

Lee Marvin was a U.S. Marine on Saipan during the Marianas campaign when he was wounded earning the Purple Heart.

[Unable to display image]

John Russell: In 1942, he enlisted in the Marine Corps where he received a battlefield commission and was wounded and highly decorated for valor at Guadalcanal.

[Unable to display image]

Charles Bronson was a tail gunner in the Army Air Corps, more specifically on B-29s in the 20th Air Force out of Guam, Tinian, and Saipan.

Robert Ryan was a U. S. Marine who served with the O. S. S. in Yugoslavia.

Tyrone Power (an established movie star when Pearl Harbor was bombed) joined the U.S. Marines, was a pilot flying supplies into, and wounded Marines out of, Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Audie Murphy, little 5'5" tall 110 pound guy from Texas who played cowboy parts?

Most Decorated serviceman of WWII and earned: Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, 2 Silver Star Medals, Legion of Merit, 2 Bronze Star Medals with "V", 2 Purple Hearts, U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, 2 Distinguished Unit Emblems, American Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with One Silver Star, Four Bronze Service Stars (representing nine campaigns) and one Bronze Arrowhead (representing assault landing at Sicily and Southern France) World War II Victory Medal Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, Combat Infantry Badge, Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar, Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar, French Fourragere in Colors of the Croix de Guerre, French Legion of Honor, Grade of Chevalier, French Croix de Guerre With Silver Star, French Croix de Guerre with Palm, Medal of

Liberated France, Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 Palm.

So how do you feel the real heroes of the silver screen acted when compared to the hollywonks today who spray out anti-American drivel as they bite the hand that feeds them? Can you imagine these stars of yester-year saying they hate our flag, making anti-war speeches, marching in anti-American parades and saying they hate our president?

I thought not, neither did I!

If you enjoyed the story send it on.


TOPICS: TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: europe; generation; greatest; hollywood; iwojima; japan; medals; normandy; okinawa; pacific; purplehearts; silverscreen; silverstars; stars; wwii

1 posted on 11/30/2004 3:47:52 PM PST by CHARLITE
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

I would like to add a name to the list. He didn't serve in the war but I think he did a lot to characterize the American spirit. He sure had a lot to do with my upbringing and values and he led me into a career in the military...John Wayne...my hero.


2 posted on 11/30/2004 3:54:00 PM PST by Cornpone ((Aging Warrior))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Now those are people to be admired. Not only do they say they support the US, they prove that they supported the US and freedom.
3 posted on 11/30/2004 3:55:56 PM PST by Trepz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
The real heroes of the silver screen had brains and common sense & could *think* for themselves. They weren't sheeple and would never allow (the few) extreme leftists back then tell them how to think.

The real heroes of the silver screen back then, loved God and the U.S.A. & would defend BOTH to the death.

4 posted on 11/30/2004 4:01:10 PM PST by the Deejay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Trepz
Amen! And they were GOOD, TALENTED ACTORS.
5 posted on 11/30/2004 4:03:16 PM PST by the Deejay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Some of those guys didn't become actors until after the war, but I'm not quibbling. Here's a guy that, though not a war vet, deserves a mention.



Canadian-born, Boston-raised paratroop sergeant in World War II, Russell joined the U.S. Army on Dec. 8, 1941, the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, as an instructor in the parachute corps. He was working as an explosives expert in 1944 when a defective fuse exploded a charge of TNT he was holding as he instructed a demolition squad at Camp Mackall, N.C. Both hands were amputated. He appeared in an Army Signal Corps documentary entitled "Diary of a Sergeant" in which he acted out the various phases of the rehabilitation process of an amputee.

Director William Wyler saw the film while preparing THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946) and cast Russell as the film's disabled returning veteran. For his performance, Russell won both the Academy Award as the year's Best Supporting Actor and a second, honorary Oscar "for bringing hope and courage to his fellow veterans." He is the only actor ever to win two Oscars for the same role.
6 posted on 11/30/2004 4:07:04 PM PST by stylin19a (Marines - filling up Iraq's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Remember the one scene in The Best Years of Our Lives", at the drug store counter a commie believer tries to tell the two soldiers how dumb they were for going to the war?

Back then, commies got taken to the ground real fast.

7 posted on 11/30/2004 4:07:22 PM PST by the Deejay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

To be fair, Audie Murphy became a movie start as a result of his medals and was unknown before the war. What makes these guys all so unique is that most people had no idea what they did. They went quietly and came back in the same manner, never trying to cash in on their exploits. So unlike Kerry.


8 posted on 11/30/2004 4:10:53 PM PST by Casloy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

As I recall Heddy Lamar (no, not Hedley from Blazing Saddles), came up with a patented scrambling device that was used in World War II.


9 posted on 11/30/2004 4:11:26 PM PST by dfwgator (It's sad that the news media treats Michael Jackson better than our military.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

A lot of big directors also aided the war effort, some making documentaries under fire. John Ford, John Huston, George Stevens, Frank Capra, many more.


10 posted on 11/30/2004 4:17:41 PM PST by Argus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Let's not forget Carole Lombard, who was killed in a plane crash during a War Bond selling tour. It was her death that pushed her husband, Clark Gable, into enlisting.


11 posted on 11/30/2004 4:22:14 PM PST by EllaMinnow (For the first time in over 20 years, I'm not represented by Bob Graham! Go MEL!! Viva Bush!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Holy omission Batman!!! Where is Henry Fonda????!!!

Henry Fonda served in the Pacific from 1942 - 1945 reaching the rank of Lieutenant (same as a Captain in the other branches). He was awarded a Bronze Star for Valor.

There are a lot of prominent actors left off this list!
12 posted on 11/30/2004 4:25:43 PM PST by stm
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

Bob Hope was a hero in my eyes.........


13 posted on 11/30/2004 4:47:59 PM PST by WhyisaTexasgirlinPA (Thank you President Bush, and thank you America!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
In his book, The Moon is a Balloon, David Niven recounted a story from his days at Sandhurst.

Each day, a cadet was chosen to carry the orderly box, which was used by a cadre officer and contained any number of things the officer might need. Once day, Cadet Niven had the box, and for a joke, he put a box of condoms in it. Niven showed the box to the other cadets, and when the major saw them giggling over the contents, he asked Niven to bring it over. Upon seeing the condoms in the box, the major turned to Niven and said, "Good show, Niven. Always be prepared."

14 posted on 11/30/2004 4:55:22 PM PST by Publius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE

Hollywood had good movies. Also, they made more. No wonder why they call it the Golden Age. I like movies from the 1970s to 1980s.


15 posted on 11/30/2004 5:01:22 PM PST by Ptarmigan (Proud rabbit hater and killer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Those who stayed and helped with the war effort also deserve some praise. There was a moment in 1953 that Edward G. Robinson thought was the proudest moment of his life.

When Korea ended and the first troop ships were preparing to dock in San Diego, the military decided to put on a show. This was to be something other than a navy band playing some marches to greet the troops. The military contacted the USO who in turn called Martha Raye.

Raye had been extremely active during the war with USO shows, and she was asked to bring along some other Hollywood folks who might like to participate. Raye called her friends Robinson, Victor Jory and Lloyd Nolan and arranged an impromptu carpool down to San Diego. Raye had sung, done stand-up comedy and was fully prepared to walk on stage and handle the MC role. Robinson, who had always worked from a script and had memorized his lines, got more and more nervous on the road as he began to panic at the prospect. What could he possibly say to men who had been through the hell of Korea, he thought.

As the greeting event unfolded, Robinson became more and more worried until it was his turn to come on stage. Grabbing at sudden inspiration, Robinson turned to the role that had defined his character in Hollywood -- the gangster. Bumming a cigar from Nolan, Robinson strutted on stage and grabbed the microphone.

"Well, I hear you guys have been to Korea. I hear you've been putting your lives on the line for the country, see. I hear you guys have been through hell." Taking a deep breath, Robinson yelled, "SO WHAT!!"

The place erupted, and the military men present gave Robinson the biggest ovation of his life. Robinson went to his grave proudest of that moment in his career.

16 posted on 11/30/2004 5:38:34 PM PST by Publius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cornpone
I agree with your comments about John Wayne, but I'm sure that not everyone does. My father, who served in the 13th Infantry regiment in Western Europe in WWII never watches the Duke and calls him a draft dodger. I read a recent biography that states that Wayne first received deferments because he was married and had children, later because of a college football injury, and finally his studio got him the last draft deferment. The biographer stated that Wayne regretted not having served.
17 posted on 12/01/2004 10:42:43 AM PST by fredhead ("Those people who will not be governed by God will be ruled by tyrants." William Penn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Lets not forget this guy. Wounded in Korea:

Or him, a Marine at Saipan


18 posted on 12/01/2004 6:32:06 PM PST by rcocean
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CHARLITE
Some of the not so greatest:

4-F


19 posted on 12/01/2004 6:34:58 PM PST by rcocean
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson