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Italians Dig Deep to Reveal Forgotten Roman City
Ancient Worlds (Reuters, Yahoo) ^ | Sun Aug 17, 2003 | Estelle Shirbon

Posted on 04/22/2006 8:04:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

for 10 years, an Italian team has been beavering away underground to reveal the wonders of Pozzuoli, once the port of ancient Rome, which is buried under a 16th century city. Excavators at Pompeii, entombed in ash and toxic debris by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, were able to remove the volcanic material and expose the city to the open air. But in Pozzuoli, whose beauty was such that the great Roman orator Cicero called it "little Rome," the ancient streets were encased in the foundations of a new city built by the Spanish in the 1500s, when they ruled what was then the Kingdom of Naples. "It would be unthinkable to destroy or damage the Spanish city because it is of major historical and architectural import," said Costanza Gialanella, the archaeologist in charge.

(Excerpt) Read more at ancientworlds.net ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: ancientrome; archaeology; catastrophism; godsgravesglyphs; pompeii; pozzuoli; romanempire; romans; vesuvius

1 posted on 04/22/2006 8:04:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: confederacy of dunces; blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 24Karet; ...
Phlagrean Fields
Caesar's wharf and the dock to the Imperial Villa can be seen underwater as can the Villa of Hortensius, a rival to Cicero. Another submerged relic to look out for is the enticing Imperial Nympheum of Baia, alas no more. A special boat with a transparent plastic hull allows the visitor to view what remains.
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2 posted on 04/22/2006 8:13:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Lucca's Roman past revealed
ANSA | March 30 2006
Posted on 03/30/2006 12:34:39 PM EST by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1606221/posts


3 posted on 04/22/2006 8:15:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
for 10 years, an Italian team has been beavering away underground

Beavering? No wonder it's been 10 years. Maybe if they were swimming after the city or gnawing down trees...

4 posted on 04/22/2006 8:15:15 PM PDT by 69ConvertibleFirebird (Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.)
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To: 69ConvertibleFirebird

Still, it's quite an interesting tail.


5 posted on 04/23/2006 5:27:41 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

If they are able to describe the city, why are there no pictures.


6 posted on 04/23/2006 6:13:43 AM PDT by Dustbunny (The only good terrorist is a dead terrorist)
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To: Dustbunny

I tried to rectify that (and note that the article is a little older, so I had to use another copy from not the original source) by using Google image search, but alas, found little. The really nice amphitheater (basically intact, and older than the Flavian amphitheater in Rome, though smaller) was in that town, but served all the towns around the Bay. You could try a search on portus julius, Ischia, Capri, or the various Roman-era town names from the Bay. :')


7 posted on 04/23/2006 8:38:20 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks. No really detailed pictures.


8 posted on 04/23/2006 12:06:09 PM PDT by Dustbunny (The only good terrorist is a dead terrorist)
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Nola: A Prehistoric "Pompeii"
by Judith Harris
To date, five Bronze Age villages have been found near Vesuvius. "Obviously there were more," said Stefano de Caro, director of the Naples Archaeological Museum. "This shows how densely settled the area was even in prehistoric times." But de Caro also noted that the Nola site is by far the most complete Bronze Age village yet found: "This is the first time [in Italy] we have found everything together: the dead, dwellings, crafts, customs, food."
Bronze-Age Venice
by Jarrett A. Lobell
July/August 2002
There is evidence of stilt houses and drainage systems, and the settlements' small islets are separated by artificial canals whose edges were strengthened with vertical logs later replaced by squared timbers... The islets, joined by bridges, may have eventually been home to as many as 2,000 people and were enlarged several times over the centuries to accommodate the community's growing population. The remains of wooden huts, stands for dugout canoes, furnishings, as well as evidence of bronze and perhaps amber working, have also been found. The site was abandoned during sixth-century floods and mudslides, and scholars say it is possible that the deserters of Poggiomarino were, in fact, the founders of Pompeii.
Move Over, Pompeii
by Jarrett A. Lobell
Archaeology
March/April 2002
Volume 55 Number 2
"Since Nola is only 7.5 miles from the volcano, people probably did not have time to pack before the eruption, and left behind cooking utensils, drinking cups, hunting tools, a hat decorated with wild boars' teeth, and a pot waiting to be fired in the kiln... So far no human remains have been found at Nola -- only several footprints preserved in the mud -- but scholars believe the skeletons of a Bronze Age man and woman discovered nearby about five years ago may be associated with the prehistoric eruption as well."
Bronze Age Village
Thursday 29 November 2001
A prehistoric village has been uncovered near Pompeii, more than 3,500 years after it was buried by Mount Vesuvius as the Roman city was centuries later. Experts called the find at Nola, near Naples, "sensational" and said the site could be the world's best preserved early Bronze Age village. The site is north of both Pompeii and Vesuvius, and suggests that the community was thriving when it was surprised by the eruption. Wooden structures in the village were destroyed by the heat but the mud that filled the buildings created a natural mould of everything they contained. Archaeologists believe that a man and a woman whose skeletons were dug up five years ago had been trying to escape from the village during the eruption.

9 posted on 10/11/2008 2:33:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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10 posted on 10/11/2008 2:33:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: 75thOVI; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; BBell; BenLurkin; ...
Note: this topic is from 2006.
 
Catastrophism
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11 posted on 10/11/2008 2:37:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv

Imperial Nympheum of Baia

I thought Bill Clinton had one of those...


12 posted on 10/11/2008 2:41:23 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: tet68

Probably several, over the years.


13 posted on 10/11/2008 3:06:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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