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Success after 40 (Vanity)
vanity ^ | unpublished | me

Posted on 07/01/2006 7:35:41 AM PDT by Bon mots

Success after the age of 40.

I need help.
I am writing an article about people who have attained their real success after the age of 40. These days we are always hearing of the wunderkind who starts an Internet company and makes zillions by the time he's 12 years old (or 25). Michael Dell, Shawn Fanning (well almost), Bill Gates and other techies/entrepreneurs all made millions by the time they were 25. We all love these rags-to-riches stories, and this seems to foster the belief that if you haven't done it by 40, you never will. I am writing about people who had their great success at or beyond middle age.

There are and were plenty of people who were otherwise regarded as failures until they were inspired to action after their fortieth birthday. I will list some here.

Grandma Moses.
Grandma Moses was nobody until she was 80. She retired from a long and hard-working life as a farmer. Then one day, she picked up a piece of wood, a paintbrush and some paint... and the rest is history. Her artwork hangs in museums across America and she is celebrated as a great artist in the folk style.

"Colonel" Harland Sanders Started the KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken) chain of restaurants when he was 65 years old.

Ray Kroc
Was a milk-shake machine salesman when he was 52. Hardly anyone's ideal job and not much of a career. Until the day he started McDonald's restaurants. The rest is history.

Sam Walton
Started Wal-Mart at or about his 40th birthday. His first successful store was basically taken away from him by his landlord's son. His landlord refused to renew his lease once he saw how much money Sam was making on that spot, and he leased it to his son instead who opened a business doing just what Sam was doing. Sam got depressed at first, but then got busy. Very busy. He proceeded to build the world's largest shopping location and a huge fortune.

So folks, this is my kernel of a story. I need help with more such inspirational stories of people who were fairly unsuccessful (financially speaking) until middle age or so. I know that there are many more such examples, and would like to have more than just a handful of paradigms.

Even a name will help, I can find the rest!

Thanks!


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: 40; 40something; motivational; notnews; over40; smellslikechat; success

1 posted on 07/01/2006 7:35:44 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots

Henry Miller was 40 when he wrote *Tropic of Cancer*


2 posted on 07/01/2006 7:38:11 AM PDT by Paul Heinzman
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To: Bon mots

I married the man of my dreams when I was 38 and our marriage is perfect. Does that count?


3 posted on 07/01/2006 7:38:13 AM PDT by Hildy (Change calls the tune we dance to.)
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To: Paul Heinzman
Henry Miller was 40 when he wrote *Tropic of Cancer*

Yes! Thanks!

4 posted on 07/01/2006 7:39:30 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots
Go buy this book
5 posted on 07/01/2006 7:42:05 AM PDT by xrp (Fox News Channel: MISSING WHITE GIRL NETWORK)
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To: Hildy
I married the man of my dreams when I was 38 and our marriage is perfect. Does that count?

Sorry, you're way too young.
Come back when you're bigger kid!
;-)

(Success isn't only measured in dollar$ and cents.)

6 posted on 07/01/2006 7:43:19 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Hildy

That's the best of all.


7 posted on 07/01/2006 7:44:00 AM PDT by b9 ("the [evil Marxist liberal socialist Democrat Party] alternative is unthinkable" ~ Jim Robinson)
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To: Bon mots

"In 1994, George Foreman once again went for the world championship, after Michael Moorer had beaten Holyfield for the IBF and WBA titles. Foreman was trailing badly on all scorecards when he suddenly knocked out Moorer in the 10th round on November 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada. With this, Foreman broke two records: He became, at the age of 45, the oldest fighter ever to win the world Heavyweight crown, and, 20 years after losing his world title for the first time, he broke the record for the fighter with the most time in between one world championship run and the next."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Foreman


8 posted on 07/01/2006 7:44:07 AM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (The man who said "there's no such thing as a stupid question" has never talked to Helen Thomas.)
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To: Hildy
The most successful people who made it after 40 are the "little people"...not the "big" people.

Like myself, many others have sacrificed most of their younger years to try to bring a business to life and subsequent success. The size of the business is not necessarily the definition of success. It is the fact that someone poured their heart and soul into what they thought would come to fruition and generate them a comfortable living for the rest of their lives...and to actually that.

That's success! Rich people getting richer is not.
9 posted on 07/01/2006 7:45:00 AM PDT by DH (The government writes no bill that does not line the pockets of special interests.)
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To: Bon mots

Kirk Kerkorian comes to mind; his true success began with the sale of his small charter airline service at age 52.


10 posted on 07/01/2006 7:45:01 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: Bon mots

Phew! I'm 32. I don't have to consider myself a failure yet, because I didn't finish writing my book yet.


11 posted on 07/01/2006 7:45:27 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: Bon mots
Wally 'Famous' Amos
12 posted on 07/01/2006 7:45:43 AM PDT by posterchild (Fresh out of compassion. How about some limited government?)
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To: Bon mots

Many of us have been successful by finding a life that we love. Getting away from the "grind" and finding a more peaceful life has been my treasure.


13 posted on 07/01/2006 7:45:46 AM PDT by wizr (John 3:16 & 17)
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To: Bon mots

Ulysses S. Grant


14 posted on 07/01/2006 7:46:23 AM PDT by patton (...in spit of it all...)
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To: DH

Correction: and to actually that.

and to actually watch that happen.


15 posted on 07/01/2006 7:46:39 AM PDT by DH (The government writes no bill that does not line the pockets of special interests.)
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To: Bon mots

I'm 47 now.


16 posted on 07/01/2006 7:48:18 AM PDT by Hildy (Change calls the tune we dance to.)
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To: xrp
Go buy this book

Thanks!
So my list now expands to include:

  1. Harvey Tauman
  2. Alex Haley
  3. Morgan Freeman
  4. Judy George
  5. Henry Ford
  6. George Foreman
  7. Mary Kay Ash
  8. Ian Fleming
  9. K.T. Oslin
  10. King Camp Gillette
  11. Jean Nidetch
  12. Margaret Rudkin
  13. Abraham Lincoln
  14. Harry Truman
  15. John Glenn
  16. Maggie Kuhn
  17. Mother Jones
  18. Mother Teresa

17 posted on 07/01/2006 7:48:25 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots

Louis Kahn


18 posted on 07/01/2006 7:52:45 AM PDT by new cruelty
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To: Bon mots

How old was Ronald Reagan when he got in politics?


19 posted on 07/01/2006 7:53:51 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (There's a dwindling market for Marxist Homosexual Lunatic Lies posing as journalism)
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To: Bon mots
Ronald Reagan was in his fifties when he started his real career as a politican. Vince Lombardi was 45 when he took the head coaching job with the Green Bay Packers. George Patton was 60 when he took over command of the 2nd Armored Division, and all of his noted work came after that. Teddy Roosevelt, the youngest man ever to hold the office of President, was 43 when he took office. Michelangelo was about forty when he did his celebrated sculpture of Moses, and continued working until his death when he was 89. Leonardo da Vinci was in his forties when he did the Last Supper and his fifties when he completed the Mona Lisa. Claude Monet was in his sixties when he did his "Water Lilies" paintings. Neil Armstrong was 16 days from his 40th birthday when he stepped on the moon (born on August 5, 1930, stepped on moon July 20, 1969).

There are a zillion more examples.

20 posted on 07/01/2006 8:03:23 AM PDT by Richard Kimball
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To: Richard Kimball

Oh, and Sam Houston was in his forties when he led the Texan Army to victory at San Jacinto.


21 posted on 07/01/2006 8:05:58 AM PDT by Richard Kimball
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To: xrp; Bon mots

There is another book about people who made it 'big' after 40. I will try to track down the name. It was about people who were moderately successful - not necessarily becoming billionaires.

One of the people in it was a local television hostess who had never been before the cameras until she was 40. If I find more information I'll post it.


22 posted on 07/01/2006 8:07:25 AM PDT by ladyjane
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To: new cruelty

Thanks. I never heard of Louis Kahn. Strange story. Somehow got a job as a professor of architecture at Yale (1947), yet never actually built anything until at least five years later.

His first major work came when he was 50 years old. The Art Gallary at Yale University (1951–1953), the first significant commission of Louis Kahn and his first masterpiece, replete with technical innovations, like a floor slab system giving access to mechanical systems, and a somewhat 'brutalist' shock to Yale's neo-Gothic context.

I've been by and in that building many times. It never struck me as a work of art in itself. I'll have to revisit one of these days.

Louis Kahn died penniles, or rather deep in debt. However, the standard of success for architects is somewhat different in that their legacy graces the landscape for centuries and thus, the financial aspects of their condition at their death are overlooked.

Good find.


23 posted on 07/01/2006 8:08:32 AM PDT by Bon mots
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

To: Bon mots

Gallary = Gallery

:-/

typo day


25 posted on 07/01/2006 8:14:52 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: HungarianGypsy
Phew! I'm 32. I don't have to consider myself a failure yet, because I didn't finish writing my book yet.

Good luck on that. I started my book when I was 32, I am 61 now and hope to be finished reading it in a few more years.

26 posted on 07/01/2006 8:14:58 AM PDT by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for Sgt. Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: Bon mots

I turn 40 this Thursday. So, unless I manage to revise, submit, get accepted, and have published a novel in the next 5 days, it looks like any success I have, at least in the public eye, will be after 40.


27 posted on 07/01/2006 9:13:44 AM PDT by Celtjew Libertarian
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To: Bon mots
Napoleon Hill writes that a man's most productive years are from 40 to 55.
28 posted on 07/01/2006 9:17:48 AM PDT by Vision ("America's best days lie ahead. You ain't seen nothing yet"- Reagan)
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To: Bon mots
Addendum:
Sam Walton was 43 years old when he started Wal-Mart.

29 posted on 07/01/2006 9:19:26 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots
Was a milk-shake machine salesman when he was 52. Hardly anyone's ideal job and not much of a career. Until the day he started McDonald's restaurants. The rest is history.

Actually, the McDonald brothers started McDonald's restaurants (the first was opened in San Bernardino in 1940; Mr. Kroc opened the ninth one as a franchise.) Mr. Kroc finally bought them out later, in 1961. Also, see the current Wikipedia entry for Ray Kroc, the answers.com entry for Ray Kroc, and the Wikipedia entry for McDonald's Corporation.

30 posted on 07/01/2006 9:35:53 AM PDT by snowsislander
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To: Bon mots

Mark Twain was in his thirties before he was published nationally. He hit his stride in his forties, and was 49 when "Huckleberry Finn" was published.


31 posted on 07/01/2006 10:27:54 AM PDT by Semi Civil Servant (Colorado: the original Red State.)
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To: Bon mots
Mathematician G. H. Hardy reportedly said that he did no work of significance until he was in his early forties.
32 posted on 07/01/2006 12:10:43 PM PDT by Slings and Arrows (Pray for peace, prepare for war.)
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To: Bon mots
Does this guy count?

Yeah, I know he went national at 37, but his first tome (and big nationwide exposure) was at 41.

33 posted on 07/01/2006 2:33:51 PM PDT by MikeD (We live in a world where babies are like velveteen rabbits that only become real if they are loved.)
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To: Bon mots

Sister Marion Irvine, my *hero* (heroine).
~~~~
" ... The story of Sister Marion Irvine amazed us all. Sister Marion did not start running until 47 years of age. She was overweight and smoked two packs a day. She started out half-running and half-walking. In 1984, she qualified for the Marathon Olympic Trials at the age of 54. ..."
~~~~

>>>>That was a record that still stands, for the oldest person to ever qualify for the Olympic Trials in the Marathon. I heard Sr. Marion speak in a small group about 2 years after that - and was so moved, I've never forgotten her. She has set every speed record for her age group and is now 71 - and still running, most likely.

When I heard her speak, she was the fastest woman in the world for her age, 57. She probably still is, but I haven't checked on her lately. When she described starting out as a smoker and overweight, how her first try was to the mailbox and every day for a week she walked/jogged to that mailbox until one day she went a little further and did that distance for a week and so on, I knew I could do that, too.

She is truly inspirational.


34 posted on 07/01/2006 5:46:46 PM PDT by Rte66
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