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Dallas Resident Dies After Eating Raw Oysters
NBC5i ^ | 9-29-06 | AP

Posted on 09/29/2006 2:55:11 PM PDT by Dysart

MCKINNEY, Texas -- The Collin County Health Department on Friday reported that a Dallas resident died earlier this week after consuming raw oysters at a restaurant in Plano.

Oysters can be contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio vulnificus. This bacterium is naturally present in marine environments and does not alter the appearance, taste, or odor of oysters.

Among healthy people, ingestion of V. vulnificus can cause vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.

In immunocompromised persons, particularly those with chronic liver disease, V. vulnificus can infect the bloodstream, causing a severe and life-threatening illness characterized by fever and chills, decreased blood pressure (septic shock), and blistering skin lesions.

(Excerpt) Read more at nbc5i.com ...


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS: oysters; vibriovulnificus
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Plan your weekend dining accordingly.
1 posted on 09/29/2006 2:55:12 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: Dysart

There was some wisdom and common sense in the Kosher dietary laws.


2 posted on 09/29/2006 2:57:20 PM PDT by PeterFinn (Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.)
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To: Dysart

I have yet to die from eating oysters, but that's just me. Spinach, on the other hand - that stuff can kill you.


3 posted on 09/29/2006 3:00:02 PM PDT by centurion316 (Democrats - Supporting Al Qaida Worldwide)
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To: Dysart

It's Septemberrrrrrrrrrr


4 posted on 09/29/2006 3:00:34 PM PDT by cripplecreek (If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?)
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To: PeterFinn
Most people I've known who consumed raw seafood do so knowing the perils, yet rather enjoyed the risky aspect of it. This is beyond me. I'd like to know this man's physical state before this happened, but so far, no word.
5 posted on 09/29/2006 3:01:25 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: cripplecreek
It's Septemberrrrrrrrrrr

Come again?

6 posted on 09/29/2006 3:03:02 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: Dysart
Most restaurants have warnings on the menu regarding oysters and rare beef.
7 posted on 09/29/2006 3:03:04 PM PDT by CindyDawg
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To: Dysart

I agree what was the health of this person before eating this.

Also what was the health of the person that died after eating spinach?

I think the average healthy person can fight off these infections or poisonings.


8 posted on 09/29/2006 3:04:13 PM PDT by BookaT (My cat's breath smells like cat food!)
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To: MikefromOhio

T.O.'s backup plan, maybe?


9 posted on 09/29/2006 3:04:35 PM PDT by Terpfen (And in the second year, Nick Saban said "Let there be a franchise quarterback...")
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To: Dysart

One of the great milestones in the evolution of man was the discovery of fire and the subsequent cooking of food which greatly reduced the chances of food poisoning.

Apparently not everyone has learned that lesson though.


10 posted on 09/29/2006 3:04:41 PM PDT by Moral Hazard ("That's why I vetoed the 'Johny can't read so let's get Johny laid' bill" - Mr. President)
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To: Dysart

The old wives tale was that you should never eat shellfish in months with an R in the name.


11 posted on 09/29/2006 3:05:22 PM PDT by cripplecreek (If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?)
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To: Dysart
I heard on the radio this morning that two people from Florida aslo died in the past week from eating raw oysters as well. Spinach anyone?
12 posted on 09/29/2006 3:05:31 PM PDT by Vote 4 Nixon (EAT...FISH...SLEEP...REDUX)
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To: Dysart
In immunocompromised persons, particularly those with chronic liver disease, V. vulnificus can infect the bloodstream.......

Code for HIV or hepatitis - both common in the "alternative lifestyle" community
13 posted on 09/29/2006 3:05:37 PM PDT by The Lumster (USA - where the innocent have nothing to fear!)
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To: Dysart
I wonder if he thought he'd be boosting his libido for the evening.

-PJ

14 posted on 09/29/2006 3:05:39 PM PDT by Political Junkie Too (It's still not safe to vote Democrat.)
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To: Dysart

I tried raw oysters once to impress a date.

I'm impressed that I didn't hurl at the table. What a disgustingly slimy scary piece of protoplasm to ingest.


15 posted on 09/29/2006 3:06:12 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: Dysart

An old myth (with much truth to it) is that you don't consume oysters during months that end in R.


16 posted on 09/29/2006 3:06:14 PM PDT by LukeL (Never let the enemy pick the battle site. (Gen. George S. Patton))
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To: Dysart; cripplecreek

You're supposed to eat oysters only in months with Rs. September is a month with an R. So this shouldn't be a problem.


17 posted on 09/29/2006 3:06:35 PM PDT by Alter Kaker ("Whatever tears one sheds, in the end one always blows one's nose." - Heine)
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To: cripplecreek

Well that's a new one on me! I must have lived a shell-tered life.


18 posted on 09/29/2006 3:06:59 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: Dysart

My Father nearly died from the same thing while in the Carolina's. He has poor liver condition and likes to go out on the shoals at low tide and eat them at 6:00AM. Even dragged my three brothers and me out while on vacation in the 70's. I for one do not like raw oysters at any time of day or night it turns out and while the oyster stew was o.k. for a side dish at dinner I skipped the remaining oyster hunts at 6;00AM. Did I mention he ate them at 6:00AM???


19 posted on 09/29/2006 3:07:00 PM PDT by Camel Joe (liberal=socialist=royalist/imperialist pawn=enemy of Freedom)
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To: cripplecreek

Actually, the rule was you should only eat shellfish during R months because the seawater is then chilly enough that the bacteria doesn't thrive.


20 posted on 09/29/2006 3:07:31 PM PDT by Argus
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To: Dysart
That's why you put the lemon juice and cocktail sauce on - to kill the bugs. Oh, that and consume with quantities of alcohol.
21 posted on 09/29/2006 3:07:39 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: LukeL
An old myth (with much truth to it) is that you don't consume oysters during months that end in R.

Actually, that's backwards. You're traditionally not supposed to eat them in June, July or August (the only months without Rs).

22 posted on 09/29/2006 3:07:51 PM PDT by Alter Kaker ("Whatever tears one sheds, in the end one always blows one's nose." - Heine)
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To: Vote 4 Nixon
I heard on the radio this morning that two people from Florida aslo died in the past week from eating raw oysters as well. Spinach anyone?

No, that was in Savannah.

23 posted on 09/29/2006 3:08:10 PM PDT by doodad
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To: Dysart; Toby06; Shyla; trussell; najida

Check out Raw Oysters Ping...

Thought you guys might appreciate this article, since you're always gabbin about the oysters and clams, etc. :)


24 posted on 09/29/2006 3:08:14 PM PDT by Lucky9teen (I love the smell of strategery in the morning...)
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To: Political Junkie Too
I wonder if he thought he'd be boosting his libido for the evening.

Now that one I do know very well.

25 posted on 09/29/2006 3:09:10 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: Dysart

Sounds like it might have been Osaka's ... I never did trust their shellfish .... I wonder why they haven't NAMED the restaraunt. Living in Plano ... I might want to know.


26 posted on 09/29/2006 3:09:16 PM PDT by Centurion2000 ("Be polite and courteous, but have a plan to KILL everybody you meet.")
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To: Alter Kaker
From Marylandseafoodfacts.org

Q. Can I eat oysters in months without an "R"?
A. Oysters can be eaten year round because of present day refrigeration. Formerly, oysters were eaten during months having an "R" in their name. This old "R" rule is no longer followed, and availability alone now governs when and how oysters may be eaten. In June, oysters spawn, which make them less plump; they are still safe for consumption.

27 posted on 09/29/2006 3:09:30 PM PDT by Cagey
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To: Vote 4 Nixon

Maybe we should ship some raw oysters and spinach over to Zawahiri and his "martyrs"?


28 posted on 09/29/2006 3:10:05 PM PDT by Lucky9teen (I love the smell of strategery in the morning...)
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To: Dog Gone

Hood Canal in Washington state is loaded with them, and we used to go there crabbing.

One afternoon I musta shucked 300 of them suckers.

People loved them. I never in my life et one and don't plan on it.
Raw butter clams, on the other hand...


29 posted on 09/29/2006 3:10:56 PM PDT by djf (Its time for all patriotic Americans to get a new pet --- a pet PIG!!)
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To: Moral Hazard
Apparantly you have never eaten fresh Apalachicola oysters.
30 posted on 09/29/2006 3:11:30 PM PDT by Jacquerie (Democrats soil institutions)
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To: Argus
"Actually, the rule was you should only eat shellfish during R months because the seawater is then chilly enough that the bacteria doesn't thrive."

I love prepared shellfish, but my rule for raw oysters is to avoid them on days that end in "y".

31 posted on 09/29/2006 3:11:47 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Alter Kaker

I'm landlocked here in Michigan where we generally don't eat too many lake clams.


32 posted on 09/29/2006 3:12:18 PM PDT by cripplecreek (If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?)
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To: Dysart
a Dallas resident died earlier this week after consuming raw oysters

The posted portion of this article fails to mention that this same Dallas resident also consumed a Coca-Cola, and played Spirograph, prior to dieing.

33 posted on 09/29/2006 3:12:41 PM PDT by laotzu
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To: Dysart

Raw oysters = #1 cause of food poisoning.


34 posted on 09/29/2006 3:13:10 PM PDT by Sir Gawain
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To: Centurion2000
I'm guessing that they didn't id the restaurant because they properly advised him of the dangers and this bug is not all that rare in raw shellfish. I'm just speculating.
35 posted on 09/29/2006 3:13:22 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: cripplecreek; Dysart
The (sensible) old-wives idea was to eat oysters ONLY in months with an R --- in other words, NOT in the warm months of May, June, July, and August, but OK September-April.

Why? Because bacteria proliferate in shellfish in the warmer waters of summertime.

36 posted on 09/29/2006 3:14:34 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Oy.)
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To: The Lumster

Yes, I'd be VERY surprised if this guy didn't have some other condition associated with this. And yeah, if you look at AIDS deaths, they've pretty much been attributed to anything you could imagine.

There are also some rather common iron storage diseases that are purely genetic. Hemochromacytoma, for instance, is very common in those of northern European descent. Having all that iron available in the body makes it very easy for microbes to form biofilms and hide from your immune system. I wouldn't be surprised if this were implicated, as well.


37 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:01 PM PDT by CheyennePress
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To: Dysart

If God had meant us to eat raw food, he wouldn't have given us the microwave.


38 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:07 PM PDT by AZLiberty (Teddy drank, people sank.)
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To: Dysart
I think it's time again for Benevolent Big Government to step in and save us....

Life has inherent risks, deal with it and plan accordingly.
39 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:13 PM PDT by mgstarr
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To: Dog Gone

LOL, I did the same thing... Walked into a bar a long time ago in San Francisco and there sitting at the bar was one of the most beautiful Asian woman I've ever seen in my life (and that's saying a lot!). She invited me to eat raw oysters with her. How could I say no?


40 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:36 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: CheyennePress; The Lumster

Eh, hemachromatosis.... sorry. ;)


41 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:59 PM PDT by CheyennePress
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To: Dysart
In my younger days I ate raw oysters a lot. I love the little critters.
In my later years I've quit doing that.
42 posted on 09/29/2006 3:16:43 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: colorado tanker
consume with quantities of alcohol

Oh c'mon. When isn't that true?

43 posted on 09/29/2006 3:16:57 PM PDT by laotzu
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To: Mrs. Don-o
Why? Because bacteria proliferate in shellfish in the warmer waters of summertime.

Seems plausible to me.

44 posted on 09/29/2006 3:17:04 PM PDT by Dysart
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To: Dog Gone
What a disgustingly slimy scary piece of protoplasm to ingest.

Agreed. I'm a huge sushi fan, but raw oysters baffle me.

45 posted on 09/29/2006 3:17:54 PM PDT by mgstarr
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To: LukeL

An old myth (with much truth to it) is that you don't consume oysters during months that end in R.
I thought it was the other way, that is when you DO eat them?


46 posted on 09/29/2006 3:18:51 PM PDT by SF Republican
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To: Dysart

I can barely do cooked oysters, much less raw ones. So I figure I'm safe. :)





47 posted on 09/29/2006 3:19:37 PM PDT by DemforBush
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To: Dysart

Lobsters Aren't Food


BY DAVE BARRY

/(This classic Dave Barry column was originally published on Jan. 26, 1996.)/

I am pleased to report that the scientific community has finally stopped wasting time on the origins of the universe and started dealing with the important question, which is: Are lobsters really just big insects?

I have always maintained that they are. I personally see no significant difference between a lobster and, say, a giant Madagascar hissing cockroach, which is a type of cockroach that grows to approximately the size of William Howard Taft (1857-1930). If a group of diners were sitting in a nice restaurant, and the waiter were to bring them each a freshly killed, steaming-hot Madagascar hissing cockroach, they would not put on silly bibs and eat it with butter. No, they would run, retching, directly from the restaurant to the All-Nite Drive-Thru Lawsuit Center. And yet these very same people will pay $24.95 apiece to eat a lobster, despite the fact that it displays all three of the classic biological characteristics of an insect, namely:

1. It has way more legs than necessary.

2. There is no way you would ever pet it.

3. It does not respond to simple commands such as, ``Here, boy!''

I do not eat lobsters, although I once had a close call. I was visiting my good friends Tom and Pat Schroth, who live in Maine (state motto: ``Cold, But Damp''). Being generous and hospitable people, Tom and Pat went out and purchased, as a special treat for me, the largest lobster in the history of the Atlantic Ocean, a lobster that probably had been responsible for sinking many commercial vessels before it was finally apprehended by nuclear submarines. This lobster was big enough to feed a coastal Maine village for a year, and there it was, sprawling all over my plate, with scary insectoid legs and eyeballs shooting out in all directions, while Tom and Pat, my gracious hosts, smiled happily at me, waiting for me to put this thing in my mouth.

Remember when you were a child, and your mom wouldn't let you leave the dinner table until you ate all your Brussels sprouts, and so you took your fork and mashed them into smaller and smaller pieces in hopes of eventually reducing them to individual Brussels-sprout molecules that would be absorbed into the atmosphere and disappear? That was similar to the approach I took with the giant lobster.

''Mmmm-MMMM!'' I said, hacking away at the thing on my plate and, when nobody was looking, concealing the pieces under my dinner roll, in the salad, in my napkin, anywhere I could find.

Tom and Pat, I love you dearly, and if you should ever have an electrical problem that turns out to be caused by a seven-pound wad of old lobster pieces stuffed into the dining-room wall socket, I am truly sorry.

Anyway, my point is that lobsters have long been suspected, by me at least, of being closet insects, which is why I was very pleased recently when my alert journalism colleague Steve Doig referred me to an Associated Press article concerning a discovery by scientists at the University of Wisconsin.

The article, headlined ''Gene Links Spiders and Flies to Lobsters,'' states that not only do lobsters, flies, spiders, millipedes, etc., contain the exact same gene, but they also are all descended from a single common ancestor: Howard Stern.

No, seriously, the article states that the ancestor ''probably was a wormlike creature.'' Yum! Fetch the melted butter!

And that is not all. According to articles sent in by alert readers (this was on the front page of The New York Times), scientists in Denmark recently discovered that some lobsters have a weird little pervert organism living on their lips. Yes. I didn't even know that lobsters had lips, but it turns out that they do, and these lips are the stomping ground of a tiny creature called Symbion pandora (literally, ``a couple of Greek words''). The zoology community, which does not get out a lot, is extremely excited about Symbion pandora, because it reproduces differently from all other life forms.

According to various articles, when Symbion pandora is ready to have a baby, its digestive system ''collapses and is reconstituted into a larva,'' which the parent then gives birth to by ''extruding'' it from its ''posterior.'' In other words -- correct me if I am wrong here -- this thing basically reproduces by pooping.

So to summarize: If you're looking for a hearty entree that 1) is related to spiders, 2) is descended from a worm and 3) has mutant baby-poopers walking around on its lips, then you definitely want a lobster. I myself plan to continue avoiding them, just as I avoid oysters, which are clearly -- scientists should look into this next -- members of the phlegm family. Have you ever seen oysters reproduce? Neither have I, but I would not be surprised to learn that the process involves giant undersea nostrils.

And don't get me started on clams. Recently, I sat across from a person who was deliberately eating clams. She'd open up a shell, and there, in plain view, would be this stark naked clam, brazenly showing its organs, like a high-school biology experiment. My feeling is that if a restaurant is going to serve those things, it should put little loincloths on them.

I believe that Mother Nature gave us eyes because she did not want us to eat this type of food. Mother Nature clearly intended for us to get our food from the ''patty'' group, which includes hamburgers, fish sticks and McNuggets -- foods that have had all of their organs safely removed someplace far away, such as Nebraska. That is where I stand on this issue, and if any qualified member of the lobster, clam or phlegm-in-a-shell industry wishes to present a rebuttal, I hereby extend this offer: Get your own column.


48 posted on 09/29/2006 3:19:51 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: Dysart; All

Oops, forgot this link to the best oyster restaurant in the oyster capital of the US, Boss Oyster.

http://www.apalachicolariverinn.com/boss.html


49 posted on 09/29/2006 3:20:16 PM PDT by Jacquerie (Democrats soil institutions)
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To: colorado tanker

Correct. Lots of hot sauce, horseradish and beer helps cut the risk. I actually read that it is true a couple of years back in a posted article on the internet. Personally, you don't have enough horseradish in the cocktail sauce unless is stings your nose when you eat it.

In the words of Jimmy Buffett's song: "Give me oysters and beer, every day of the year and I'll be fine."


50 posted on 09/29/2006 3:21:05 PM PDT by RatRipper
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