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A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection
University of Auckland Department of Computer Science ^ | 23 December 2006 | Peter Gutmann

Posted on 12/23/2006 5:51:48 PM PST by IncPen

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To: ekwd

Well, I'll install it, and if it improves my gaming, I'll be happy, but if it bollix's up other things, I will either remove it, or download hacks to fix it. Micro$oft hasn't been able to do any real damage with WGA for XP, anyone with a pirated version can bypass all of their controls in minutes.


51 posted on 12/23/2006 8:02:33 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Pro Evolution, Pro Stem Cell Research, Pro Science, Pro Free Thought, and Conservative)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
I've had no trouble with WGA and I've been happily using XP since the night before it was released in 2001 (thanks to another evil corporation- WALMART).
But then my only experience with a really greedy computer company is with Apple.
52 posted on 12/23/2006 8:11:44 PM PST by ekwd (Murphy's Law Has Not Been Repealed)
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To: Dallas59
I just got XP working....Now I have to start all over again?

If I'm not mistaken, Vista won't be unleashed on the populace before the middle of January. After Christmas, notebooks and desktops should be dirt cheap. I'd stick with XP and buy now. Two of my former coworkers were beta-testing it and one loved it, but he had 4 gigs of RAM to power it. The other one hated it. The demo I saw didn't enthrall me. It seemed to me that it was much ado about nothing...

53 posted on 12/23/2006 8:12:38 PM PST by ABG(anybody but Gore) ("By the time I'm finished with you, you're gonna wish you felt this good again" - Jack Bauer)
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To: Revel
This is an easy problem to fix. Don't buy it. Don't buy any computer that has it. Microsoft will change there tune then.

The problem is that the hardware manufacturers will need to build their hardware in such a way for it to work with Vista. By doing so, unless you get drivers to work with your OS, and those damned rules of "protection" are built in to the hardware, you won't be able to use the hardware with any OS not approved by MS!

I think that I might buy a few spare "bare bones" systems for parts. I think that XP will be the last MS OS that I purchase for my own personal use.

Mark

54 posted on 12/23/2006 8:13:39 PM PST by MarkL (When Kaylee says "No power in the `verse can stop me," it's cute. When River says it, it's scary!)
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To: ekwd

I meant that pirated XP can circumvent WGA very easily.

I nearly have enough old components for a second computer, I'll make that Linux.


55 posted on 12/23/2006 8:14:32 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Pro Evolution, Pro Stem Cell Research, Pro Science, Pro Free Thought, and Conservative)
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To: barb-tex
This means run OSX. The Bill Gates police wont get you if you dont run that stupid Windows.I dont care if Algore is on the Board as they have been sandal wearing pot smoking since forever, but still the best OS around for me. Of course I am still driving antiques anyway.

That's all well and good, as long as you don't need to use certain applications that require Windows to run. A situation like that is akin to having a wonderful camera, but no film available for it.

Mark

56 posted on 12/23/2006 8:17:10 PM PST by MarkL (When Kaylee says "No power in the `verse can stop me," it's cute. When River says it, it's scary!)
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To: IncPen
The thing that disturbed me is that MS doesn't want the "card" manufactures to provide "Open Source" drivers for their products (with penalties).
This is thrown in to put LINUX at a competitive disadvantage.
As Microsoft has a 90% market share, this then becomes an antitrust issue.
That level of anticompetitive activity works better in a dictatorship than a free economy.
The one complaint I ever had about John Ashcroft was that the Justice Department, under his leadership, let Microsoft off the hook.
57 posted on 12/23/2006 8:22:06 PM PST by WildBill2275 (The Second Amendment guarantees all of your other rights)
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To: IncPen
No, not automatically fail. . . .

Well, I am glad you clarified that; however, even if that is not what you intend, the end result could very well be the same.

Seemingly you are smart enough to be attuned to the market and willing to adjust your products to suit the market.

What market? If my property rights are not protected—if someone can take my work and give it to others without compensating me for it—then there is no meaningful market to speak of. (market n: "a meeting together of people for the purpose of trade by private purchase and sale.")

But you seem to be under the impression that you have the same rights as the record companies, the mainstream news outlets or the film and video production companies in regard to copyright issues. I'd suggest you look up the DMCA, or the 'Sonny Bono Act' to see what a few well placed millions will buy these days.

You seem to be under the impression that I should dislike big, bad media corporations because they have managed to get laws passed to protect their rights. As it happens, my books are published by one of those corporations. If they lose, so do I.

Perhaps the companies have more rights under the law than I do. But tell me, what rights do I retain when the "file sharers" distribute my work without compensating me?

Finally, I'd offer the observation (again) that the rise of Napster, file sharing, etc. is the unintended- and natural- consequence of a perversion of market efficiency by greedy producers of IP who are now enjoying their just desserts. And that that is undeniably a Good Thing.

Undeniably a Good Thing? Thus far you have not given me any reason to think so.

Apparently you believe that the producers of IP are greedy and therefore merit some kind of comeuppance for their greed. But who really are the greedy parties here? It seems to me that no one is greedier than those who expect to enjoy the work of others without paying for it.

58 posted on 12/23/2006 8:22:14 PM PST by Logophile
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To: sauropod

review


59 posted on 12/23/2006 8:23:31 PM PST by sauropod ("Come have some pie with me.")
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To: MarkL
. . . as long as you don't need to use certain applications that require Windows to run. A situation like that is akin to having a wonderful camera, but no film available for it.

Where have you been? Macs can run Windows apps either with (Bootcamp or Parallels) or without Windows (Crossover Mac).

60 posted on 12/23/2006 8:24:58 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE is "AAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

I'll stay with the OS that runs my apps and hardware, which means that for the time being I'll keep XP on my desktop.


61 posted on 12/23/2006 8:25:32 PM PST by ekwd (Murphy's Law Has Not Been Repealed)
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In short and in simple terms: How does this effect Free Republic?


62 posted on 12/23/2006 8:28:51 PM PST by yield 2 the right
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To: yield 2 the right

Fun on a Saturday night.


63 posted on 12/23/2006 8:37:37 PM PST by ekwd (Murphy's Law Has Not Been Repealed)
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To: Covenantor
Keeping the Timex Sinclair doesn't seem like such a bad idea after all.

My First Computer!



Timex Sinclair 1000
Introduced: July 1982
Price: US $99.95
How many? 500,000 in first 6 months
Weight: 12 ounces
CPU: Zilog Z80A, 3.25MHz
RAM: 2K, 64K max
Display: 22 X 32 text
hooks to TV
Ports: memory, cassette
Peripherals: Cassette recorder
T/S printer
OS: ROM BASIC
64 posted on 12/23/2006 9:05:30 PM PST by HangnJudge
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To: Charles H. (The_r0nin)
Exactly. First example: the Walt Disney Corporation. For decades now the employees of Walt Disney have been reaping wild profits off of intellectual property they had no hand in creating. Almost all of the creators of the classic Disney characters are dead, yet these corporate types still leech off of ideas that they never had anything to do with.

Perhaps. But the IP pirates have been stealing work that they had no hand in creating.

One could argue that Disney continues to produce movies financed in part by the "wild profits" they make. (By the way, what level of profit qualifies as "wild" in your view?)

In contrast, file sharers and other IP pirates produce nothing.

How? By paying/bribing Congress to extend copyright protection well beyond any reasonable duration. . . . Return copyright to the original 7 years set by the Founding Fathers (or even to the life of the originator), and all of this mess would go away.

If you are trying to make the case that the intellectual property laws should be changed, then I am willing to listen. I would just ask that you answer some questions:

(1) What is a "reasonable duration" of copyright protection, and why?

(2) How would you go after the corporate "copyright leeches" without also harming writers, artists, and other producers of IP?

(3) What would you propose be done about those who steal IP after the law has been changed to your liking?

That last question is important because, despite your assurance that "all of this mess would go away," I am not convinced. Once a large number of persons come to believe they have the right to enjoy free music, movies, and other IP, why would they ever pay a dime for it?

65 posted on 12/23/2006 9:13:17 PM PST by Logophile
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To: Logophile
If my property rights are not protected—if someone can take my work and give it to others without compensating me for it—then there is no meaningful market to speak of.

It's the digital age, friend. Up until now the publishers had all the power and they sneered at their customers at the same time they artificially controlled supply and demand. Which is my entire point. Read Bethell's book. He makes a pretty solid case that 'intellectual property' pretty much evaporates as soon as an idea is expressed.

You seem to be under the impression that I should dislike big, bad media corporations because they have managed to get laws passed to protect their rights give them an unfair advantage in the marketplace.

As it happens, my books are published by one of those corporations. If they lose, so do I.

Can't help you there. Sign better contracts would be my advice.

Perhaps the companies have more rights under the law than I do. But tell me, what rights do I retain when the "file sharers" distribute my work without compensating me?

Well, if it bothers you so much, stop producing work in digital formats. It takes alot of Xerox paper (not to mention a compelling masterpiece) to make all that effort worthwhile.

But who really are the greedy parties here? It seems to me that no one is greedier than those who expect to enjoy the work of others without paying for it.

You seem to view yourself as some sort of victim.

Might I suggest that you stop writing and simply keep your ideas inside, where noone can see them without giving you your due?

At the very least, stop writing to me; I've lost interest in this, your latest novel.

66 posted on 12/23/2006 9:25:38 PM PST by IncPen (When Al Gore Finished the Internet, he invented Global Warming)
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To: ThePythonicCow
Nice reply - the dinosaur media companies and Microsoft have enough clout to make some things illegal that are flying in the face of what's sensible. They are motivated by enormous greed, not by what is sensible public policy.

No, it was a silly reply. Say what you will about the "dinosaur media companies," at least they produce something that other people want. In contrast, file sharers produce nothing.

Sensible public policy would encourage people to produce. It would not encourage people to steal other people's work.

If the church of the medieval monks had enough clout to outlaw the printing press, because it threatened an end run around their monopoly on hand copied books, that would not have make it right.

Bad analogy. A better analogy would be if the monks forbade anyone from printing copies of their illuminated books without permission. That would be their right.

If the owners of the printing presses wanted books to print, they would have to get permission from the church, hire their own authors, or write the books themselves.

Sometimes the law reflects good. Sometimes it reflects greed. . . . This seems to be a pretty clear case of the latter.

See my tag line.

67 posted on 12/23/2006 9:37:58 PM PST by Logophile (No one is greedier than those who expect to enjoy the work of others without paying for it.)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

What games now run better/faster on 64 bit systems?


68 posted on 12/23/2006 9:48:42 PM PST by Northern Alliance
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To: Vermont Lt
Have you ever tried to get a license fee for music? I was trying to make a DVD for my daughters basketball team. It was to include 3-4 different songs. After contacting ASCAP, I found out that I would have to secure a license from each label, and in turn the attorneys of each recording artist.

In the end, it simply was too confusing. I WOULD have paid for it. I am in the copyrighted content business, and I felt it would only be right and proper. It would have been a good example for the kids and their parents.

However, getting the rights to the music for 15-20 DVDs was simply not worth the effort.

Make the fees reasonable and easy to secure, and most people will do the right thing.

Interesting post.

Some day I'll tell you about when I saw Disney wanting to charge (interdepartmentally) $100,000 to use a Disney song in an invite to a party for people (sponsors) who give vast amounts of money to Disney companies. And how including lyrics would be another $100,000. I'm talking about a party with a modest invitation list (less than 1500 people), but who provided $100 million in revenue to the company.

These fees were developed and administered by people who had nothing to do with creating the music or the lyrics. They simply owned the product and were charged (as a revenue center) with maximizing its value-- even to another department in their own company.

Needless to say, the petitioning department chose another route.

69 posted on 12/23/2006 9:55:24 PM PST by IncPen (When Al Gore Finished the Internet, he invented Global Warming)
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To: Nailbiter

ping


70 posted on 12/23/2006 9:59:44 PM PST by IncPen (When Al Gore Finished the Internet, he invented Global Warming)
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To: IncPen
It's the digital age, friend. Up until now the publishers had all the power and they sneered at their customers at the same time they artificially controlled supply and demand. Which is my entire point. Read Bethell's book. He makes a pretty solid case that 'intellectual property' pretty much evaporates as soon as an idea is expressed.

Yes, it is the digital age. But stealing is stealing, whether it is done digitally or not. And no amount of rationalizing about "artificially controlled supply and demand" will change that. (Are you sure you wouldn't steal music and movies if you found some that liked?)

Well, if it bothers you so much, stop producing work in digital formats. It takes alot of Xerox paper (not to mention a compelling masterpiece) to make all that effort worthwhile.

As a matter of fact, I do not allow my work to be produced digitally. I would like to: It would be more convenient for my readers. But right now I cannot risk it.

You seem to view yourself as some sort of victim.

Not at all. I am doing quite well. I intend to keep it that way.

On the contrary, you are the one complaining about the unfair advantages that the IP laws supposedly give to sneering publishers.

Might I suggest that you stop writing and simply keep your ideas inside, where noone can see them without giving you your due?

You may suggest that; but I am not likely to follow your suggestion.

At the very least, stop writing to me; I've lost interest in this, your latest novel.

Gladly. I just hope that next time you show up to complain about IP laws you have something to offer beyond in vague generalities and sweeping assertions.

71 posted on 12/23/2006 10:03:45 PM PST by Logophile (No one is greedier than those who expect to enjoy the work of others without paying for it.)
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To: Covenantor

"Keeping the Timex Sinclair doesn't seem like such a bad idea after all. ;>)"

LOL - I still have mine.

;^D

72 posted on 12/23/2006 10:22:18 PM PST by RebelTex (Help cure diseases: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1548372/posts)
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To: rdb3; LibreOuMort
Mala Vista ping
73 posted on 12/23/2006 10:30:37 PM PST by sionnsar (?trad-anglican.faithweb.com?|Iran Azadi| 5yst3m 0wn3d - it's N0t Y0ur5 (SONY) | UN: Useless Nations)
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To: Logophile

So all us us must be punished. Sheer Genius. (sarcasm)


74 posted on 12/23/2006 10:36:21 PM PST by packrat35 (guest worker/day worker=SlaveMart)
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To: Northern Alliance

A few games have updates for Windows 64.

Flight Sim will have a Vista upgrade that is well needed, even a very high end system can't run Flight Sim X very well.


75 posted on 12/23/2006 10:40:06 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Pro Evolution, Pro Stem Cell Research, Pro Science, Pro Free Thought, and Conservative)
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To: IncPen

What's wrong with Zune?


76 posted on 12/23/2006 10:41:24 PM PST by packrat35 (guest worker/day worker=SlaveMart)
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To: rlmorel

"we have a huge amount of money invested in Microsoft workstations, servers and software, not to mention the absolute dependence our radiologic viewing (PACS) software has on Internet Explorer."

That could be big-time trouble.  Assuming that none of those workstations or servers currently have 'Premium' content on them now, I can think of several ways that it might accidentally get introduced to the network.

  1. An employee brings in a music CD so he can listen while he works.
  2. A new software program is installed that has some sample 'Premium' content which gets played during the intro 'tour' of the product - maybe MS Office (which has tons of multimedia files) or even Vista itself.
  3. An employee's or other user's typo in an url might result in visiting a website that automatically plays 'Premium' content when the page loads.
  4. A new piece of hardware is installed that has some sample 'Premium' content which gets played during the intro 'tour' of the product - a new medical imaging device, video card, sound card, monitor, connecting to external HDTV, etc.
  5. A hacker breaks into the network and uses a server or workstation to store 'Premium' content so he can have access whenever he wants but not have it traced back to him.

And those are just some of the possiblilties.

I wish you luck if your employer upgrades to Vista.

 


77 posted on 12/23/2006 10:41:50 PM PST by RebelTex (Help cure diseases: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1548372/posts)
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To: Logophile

Downloading is NOT stealing, it is copyright infringement. It is NOT the same thing, no matter how many times people say so.

If I went to a book store and removed a copy of the book without paying - THAT would be stealing. I would have taken the actual physical item from the store.

Downloading is still wrong, but it is NOT theft.


78 posted on 12/23/2006 10:46:44 PM PST by packrat35 (guest worker/day worker=SlaveMart)
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To: packrat35

Zune is a flop.

Its main feature is "squirting" via wi-fi of music from one zune to another. Two problems, the person who gets the music can only listen for 2 days, doesn't mind if the music is free to distribute. And, good luck finding another person with a Zune.

My nephew bought one, I figure its going back. They have already figured out a way to hack the squirting of files, but the Zune, in its two color config (brown or white) has a nickname, the $**tbrick.


79 posted on 12/23/2006 10:47:02 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Pro Evolution, Pro Stem Cell Research, Pro Science, Pro Free Thought, and Conservative)
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To: rlmorel

DRM is evil and needs to die. As long as DRM infects most LEGAL downloads, it only encourages ILLEGAL ones more.


80 posted on 12/23/2006 10:48:57 PM PST by packrat35 (guest worker/day worker=SlaveMart)
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To: Bookwoman

Several times a second the OS will check all the hardware to makes sure it is in compliance with the HD encryption standard. It will look at the video card and display and other parts too It will also phone home to ask for a key to start playing.

It would vary easy to track every movie watched in the world at any given time.

The battle over the encryption schemes has delayed HD for years.

You put your disk in to play a movie it checks all the hardware even checks to make sure you don't have two LCD plugged in and if everything is OK then it will phone home to ask if it is OK for you to watch the movie. I’m sure this will never be abused. S/C


81 posted on 12/23/2006 10:58:28 PM PST by Goldwater and Gingrich
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To: Mrs Zip

ping


82 posted on 12/23/2006 11:02:16 PM PST by zip (((Remember: DimocRat lies told often enough become truth to 48% of all Americans (NRA)))))
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To: Central Scrutiniser; All

I thnk microsoft painted a HUGE bullseye on vista.


83 posted on 12/23/2006 11:03:32 PM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: packrat35
What's wrong with Zune?

Avoid the loony Zune

84 posted on 12/23/2006 11:09:48 PM PST by IncPen (When Al Gore Finished the Internet, he invented Global Warming)
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To: Goldwater and Gingrich

Thank you!


85 posted on 12/23/2006 11:56:27 PM PST by Bookwoman
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To: Logophile
"I keep hearing the same assertion (1 wouln't call it an argument) from people who apparently think it should be their right to enjoy what I produce without paying me for it. They never can explain why I should consider this a Good Thing. Can you?"

Because in order to protect your "rights", you are penalizing 99.99% of the people for the actions of 0.01%. NOT equitable. Most people ARE honest.

And Jim Baen has settled the issue by actually doing the experiment. "Piracy" in actual fact acts as free advertising.

And the copyright laws today are ludicrous. A patent only lasts for a very limited time compared to copyright. AT MOST, a copyright should be for the author's lifetime (if you want a legacy for your offspring, save and invest the money you make from the copyrighted material, and will THAT to them).

86 posted on 12/24/2006 3:26:37 AM PST by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: Logophile

I don't steal, I share.

Matt 10:8 Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils: freely ye have received, freely give.
KJV

Merry Christmas to you as well, and everyone else. I even have good will towards the excessively rich and greedy Bill 'Money' Gates right now. Probably the homemade apple wine kicking in. As Granny Clampett once said, "I think this cider's done turned."


87 posted on 12/24/2006 5:20:43 AM PST by KarinG1 (Opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not necessarily represent those of sane people.)
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To: Swordmaker
Where have you been? Macs can run Windows apps either with (Bootcamp or Parallels) or without Windows (Crossover Mac).

Not if there are direct hardware calls... Some things simply can't be virtualized. While virtualization is a wonderful thing, there are simply some things that it can't do. And in a dual boot environment, once MS has written apps to work exclusively with Vista, you'll have to run it on Vista compatible hardware.

Mark

88 posted on 12/24/2006 5:32:53 AM PST by MarkL (When Kaylee says "No power in the `verse can stop me," it's cute. When River says it, it's scary!)
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To: Logophile

I am sorry that your only measure of value is monetary. Words do mean things.

"Dollars or Euros?' No, payment is exchange of value for the valued. The thieves take what they value, regardless of the cost in coin, and pay what they deem appropriate.

Re 'market or marketeers,' read a bit more closely.

Tagline...


89 posted on 12/24/2006 5:39:46 AM PST by dhuffman@awod.com (The conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense.)
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To: RebelTex

"I wish you luck if your employer upgrades to Vista."

Exactly. How can we avoid not doing it? The majority of them are currently Windows 2000, which is more reliable than XP, but we are starting the shift to XP.

I have heard that Microsoft only supports two OSes at the same time with patches, currently XP and 2000, but with Vista will drop XP. Can anyone verify this?


90 posted on 12/24/2006 6:55:49 AM PST by rlmorel (Islamofacism: It is all fun and games until someone puts an eye out. Or chops off a head.)
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To: packrat35

In theory I do not think it is evil.

In its current incarnations....yes.


91 posted on 12/24/2006 6:56:53 AM PST by rlmorel (Islamofacism: It is all fun and games until someone puts an eye out. Or chops off a head.)
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To: Logophile
By the way, what level of profit qualifies as "wild" in your view?

A better word would have been "undeserved." While promotion, marketing, and financing are important in content utilization, the actual content creators usually see little of the profits (pennies on the dollar), simply because they are forced to sign over their rights to their creation in order to have it promoted. I'm sorry, but that has more to do with media monopolies than market practices.

What is a "reasonable duration" of copyright protection, and why?

O.K., I'll bite. For the time being (at least until we can look at a universal ten year copyright): A work would be copyrighted by the creator for his or her life, with rights assignable for ten years to any corporate entity. Note that this would change the "work-for-hire" copyright provisions drastically (making far more content creators contractors rather than employees). At the end of any ten year period the creator could reassign the rights for another ten years (which, of course would probably mean more negotiations, contracts, and ultimately income for the creator and more competition for the corporations). Should the ten years lapse and the author be deceased, the copyright expires and the product enters the public domain.

Way too much content is bottled up in permanent corporate holdings. How many companies are simply living off of their libraries of content? I would suggest there are many... many who are producing very little new content and living off of old content that finances them (the exact opposite of the Founding Father's rationale for copyright protections). Sure, your mega-content-holders like Sony are producing new things... but usually not in the realm in which they hold their vast libraries (Sony's music division is subsidizing their massive battery recall and the sales of their PS3s). Breaking up the monopolies is a good thing.

Once a large number of persons come to believe they have the right to enjoy free music, movies, and other IP, why would they ever pay a dime for it?

There will always be thieves. The trick is to convince the average person to obey copyright. How much of the music download scene is new releases? How much is legacy tracks (stuff that is more than ten years old)? I doubt anyone knows... but this is an important consideration. Likewise, it is much easier to protect something for a short period of time, rather than a long one. Companies would have an incentive to maximize the profits early... as they know a new contract or loss of copyright is only years away. It focuses the industry on finding new and great things, rather than jealously guarding the few things they already have. That difference alone would radically change the system (and help the problem. If you make most of your money in the first two years of marketing something, who cares if the hackers crack it in five?). You'll never get rid of piracy. But you can change the marketplace so piracy is less valuable (hey, why steal when I just need to wait a few years...?).

92 posted on 12/24/2006 7:12:44 AM PST by Charles H. (The_r0nin) (Hwt! Lr bi mst hord, solce!)
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To: MarkL

"Not if there are direct hardware calls... Some things simply can't be virtualized. While virtualization is a wonderful thing, there are simply some things that it can't do. And in a dual boot environment, once MS has written apps to work exclusively with Vista, you'll have to run it on Vista compatible hardware.

Mark"

Yep!
Also Games SUCK running on Mac's. I have tried. Flight Sim X, Battlefield 2142, Splinter Cell Double Agent... All suck. I can't even get Battlefield 2142 to run.

Lest one thinks this is strictly a game problem...

Access on Mac = no go.
Adobe Indesign/CS2 on Intel based Macs = Good luck getting anything to run.
Hardware based Graphics acceleration = Forget it.
Mutiple Monitors = No Go (I currently run 3 on my XP Box)

The list goes on. Macs are a great product! They are not the end all be all answer for everyone. I wish they were I would love to kick M$ to the curb. Just not gonna happen anytime soon.


93 posted on 12/24/2006 7:18:54 AM PST by Syntyr (Freepers - In the top %5 of informed Americans!)
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To: Vermont Lt

You should have just used the music... you weren't selling it... yout use would have been too small for them to care except for sending a "Cease and Desist" letter, which would, chances are, never happen.

Now if you were making 10,000 units and planning on selling them for 14.99 each at your daughter's game, I would be more concerned...



94 posted on 12/24/2006 7:23:33 AM PST by ARA
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To: rlmorel
They will someday find a less onerous way.

No, they won't. Because the problem in DRM is basic physics (every addition of information requires additional energy spent somewhere: entropy)... and you can't beat that. Digital signals are simply ones and zeroes, usually represented by electrons or photons, that carry information. These ones and zeroes (whether electrons or photons... or marks on a piece of paper) could be carrying your grocery list, greetings to a relative, your child's homework, or copyrighted content. How can you tell without marking, encrypting, or translating them? Regardless of scheme, DRM will require restrictions on your ability to manipulate all of those ones and zeroes in order to protect a few of them. You will have to convince your DRM that the ones and zeroes are yours or licensed to you before the DRM will let you manipulate or display the content. No matter what scheme you can imagine, DRM can only work by restricting you, the user. And convincing the DRM always requires processing power, and always is prone to error. It will always increase the price of the equipment, and it will always increase the difficulty of basic tasks (as DRM must monitor everything or it is useless).

So there is no quick fix. Only by taking your ability to freely manipulate those ones and zeroes away can DRM "protect" content...

95 posted on 12/24/2006 7:28:16 AM PST by Charles H. (The_r0nin) (Hwt! Lr bi mst hord, solce!)
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To: rlmorel

"I have heard that Microsoft only supports two OSes at the same time with patches, currently XP and 2000, but with Vista will drop XP. Can anyone verify this?"

On June 30, 2005, the Windows 2000 product family (including Windows 2000 Server, Advanced Server, Datacenter Server, and Windows 2000 Professional) transitions from the Mainstream Support to Extended Support phase. This transition marks the progression of Windows 2000 through its product life cycle, originally announced in 2002. The Windows 2000 family entered the marketplace in February 2000 and remains a robust, mature product as it enters its 5-year Extended Support life-cycle phase.

Overview
• On June 30, 2005, the Windows 2000 product family enters the Extended Support phase, which continues for at least 5 years through June 2010.

• Microsoft offers a minimum of 10 years' support (5 years Mainstream plus 5 years Extended) for business and developer products. The Microsoft support life-cycle policy provides predictable coverage of Microsoft products and continues to set the standard for product support policies industry-wide.

• Microsoft is not ending support for Windows 2000. During the Extended Support phase, Microsoft continues to provide security hot fixes and paid support but no longer provides complimentary support options, design change requests, and non-security hotfixes.*

Security updated for Win2k will still happen for a while to come. XP obviously longer than that. My office just started the migration to XP and does not plan on moving to Vista in the forseeable future, maybe not at all. No business case has been made for the upgrade.


96 posted on 12/24/2006 7:30:51 AM PST by Syntyr (Freepers - In the top %5 of informed Americans!)
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To: Charles H. (The_r0nin)

Ding Ding Ding, we have a WINNER!


97 posted on 12/24/2006 8:02:27 AM PST by JimFreedom (My patience is growing thin)
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To: IncPen

Yeah, even if it is not protected I am not buying it either,LOL! Don't like the style, but hey I have to run, need to DOWNLOAD some music...........


98 posted on 12/24/2006 8:11:03 AM PST by JimFreedom (My patience is growing thin)
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To: packrat35
So all us us must be punished. Sheer Genius. (sarcasm)

As I said in my first post, dishonest people impose costs on all of us. I do not like it; I wish it were not so. I wish it were not necessary for me to have locks on my doors or to present ID whenever I have to cash a check or to remember a password to log into a favorite web site.

I am not saying that I approve of what Microsoft et al. are doing to protect IP rights. Personally, I do not enjoy having to deal with yet another burdensome security measure. And as some suggest, it may very well backfire as a business decision.

What I am saying is that those companies have every right to protect their IP. In so doing, they are not the villains in this tale. Instead of condemning them, anger should be directed toward those who would violate their IP.

99 posted on 12/24/2006 8:11:37 AM PST by Logophile (No one is greedier than those who expect to enjoy the work of others without paying for it.)
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To: Charles H. (The_r0nin)
Instead, copyright leeches are trying hard to use the force of government to make money off of ideas they never had anything to do with in the first place...

American copyright law is a joke. Good post.

100 posted on 12/24/2006 8:17:02 AM PST by Wormwood (I'm with you in Rockland)
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