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Original Lincoln document found
AP ^ | 6/7/07

Posted on 06/07/2007 3:26:01 PM PDT by bnelson44

WASHINGTON—The National Archives on Thursday unveiled a handwritten note by Abraham Lincoln exhorting his generals to pursue Robert E. Lee's army after the battle of Gettysburg, underscoring one of the great missed opportunities for an early end to the Civil War. An archives Civil War specialist discovered the July 7, 1863, note three weeks ago in a batch of military papers stored among the billions of pages of historical documents at the mammoth building on Pennsylvania Avenue.

The text of Lincoln's note has been publicly known because the general to whom Lincoln addressed it telegraphed the contents verbatim to the front lines at Gettysburg. There, the Union army's leaders failed for more than a week to aggressively pursue Lee following his defeat.

A week after Lincoln's note, the Confederate army slipped across the Potomac River into Virginia and the war continued for two more years.

Though Gen. George Meade led the Northern troops in the battle at Gettysburg that marked the turning point of the war, he has always been faulted for not closing in and destroying Lee's army.

At a news conference, archivist Trevor Plante said he was looking for something else last month when he found Lincoln's note tucked away in a drawer among other papers. His reaction was "wow" when he recognized the handwriting and Lincoln's signature.

Lincoln's note says "the rebellion will be over" if only "Gen. Meade can complete his work." Lincoln says he wants the "substantial destruction of Lee's army."

Plante's find reinforces "Lincoln's desperation to turn Gettysburg not just into victory, but decisive victory that stops the bloodshed," said historian Allen Guelzo, director of Civil War era studies at Gettysburg College.

The importance of the newly discovered document is that it is in Lincoln's own handwriting, pinning down in time what he was thinking.

The accuracy of the long-known telegram communicating Lincoln's thoughts was not in doubt. At the same time, "there are always risks" relying on documents by a third party for what Lincoln was saying or writing, said Guelzo.


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: abelincoln; civilwar; despotlincoln; dixie; gettysburg; godsgravesglyphs; lincoln; ourgreatestpresident; ourworstpresident; saintabraham; tyranylincoln; warcriminal
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1 posted on 06/07/2007 3:26:03 PM PDT by bnelson44
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To: bnelson44
Well at least there is one piece of Presidential correspondence Sandy Burgler didn't’t liberate.
2 posted on 06/07/2007 3:29:00 PM PDT by Don Corleone (Leave the gun..take the cannoli)
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To: bnelson44

I’ve been watching Ken Burns’ Civil War recently. The parallels between Lincoln/civil war and Bush/wot are noticeable. Very unpopular presidents but both sticking to their guns. The inabilty to finish off the enemy due to political concerns, etc.


3 posted on 06/07/2007 3:29:31 PM PDT by InvisibleChurch (Forty on the highway, forty in the driveway.)
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To: bnelson44

Doesn’t say to whom the original note was addressed, but I assume it was MG Halleck.


4 posted on 06/07/2007 3:33:46 PM PDT by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo Arabiam Esse Delendam -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit)
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To: bnelson44

Meade’s reluctance paled in comparison to McClellan’s ineptitude at Antietam.


5 posted on 06/07/2007 3:34:57 PM PDT by sono (Note to W: Pardon Scooter NOW!)
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To: bnelson44

Meade wasn’t the guy to go after Lee.


6 posted on 06/07/2007 3:35:03 PM PDT by SittinYonder (Ic ■Št gehate, ■Št ic heonon nelle fleon fotes trym, ac wille fur­or gan)
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To: bnelson44
That darn Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine changed the course of history by narrowly defeating the rebels on little round top...if not for that, the South could have gone on to win the whole shootin’ match...and maybe remnants of our long since deceased Constitution would still remain. Before then, people said the United States are...now they say The United States is...
7 posted on 06/07/2007 3:36:51 PM PDT by gorush (Exterminate the Moops!)
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To: bnelson44
Incredible, and I just finished reading a book on Lincoln called "Lincoln" by David Herbert Donald, one of the best bios of the man I ever read. I won`t ruin it by going into detail, but the description of Lincolns early years was incredible, I must have went through that part 15 times.

By the way, anyone ever see this colorization? Don`t know who did it, but damn, this has to be one of the best colorizations I`ve ever seen of any B&W photo out there. It must have taken this guy ages to do this...


8 posted on 06/07/2007 3:43:39 PM PDT by Screamname (On this date in history; Al Gore invents the Algorithm)
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To: Screamname

Always liked this portrait of him. He's got a crafty look in his eye.

9 posted on 06/07/2007 3:49:03 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~Ö)
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To: Screamname

Mmmmm, mmmmm, if only I were gay.


10 posted on 06/07/2007 3:51:22 PM PDT by keat (You know who I feel bad for? Arab-Americans who truly want to get into crop-dusting.)
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To: Texas Mulerider; Oorang; freedomfiter2; SWEETSUNNYSOUTH; BnBlFlag; catfish1957; afnamvet; ...

Dixie ping


11 posted on 06/07/2007 3:54:14 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: CatoRenasci

General Meade.


12 posted on 06/07/2007 3:58:11 PM PDT by SF Republican
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To: Screamname

incredible photgraphs...are those Matthew’s?


13 posted on 06/07/2007 3:58:52 PM PDT by wardaddy (on parole)
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To: gorush
That darn Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine changed the course of history For a Southerner like myself, that sentence puts a knot in my stomach to this day that in-and-of-itself surprises even me (of course it has been only 150 years)
14 posted on 06/07/2007 4:00:38 PM PDT by SF Republican
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To: wardaddy

I don`t know, I found them on some website a few years ago and I just can`t find that website again, it`s been driving me crazy. That is obsession that kind of colorization. This guy must have went literally pixel by pixel.


15 posted on 06/07/2007 4:02:16 PM PDT by Screamname (On this date in history; Al Gore invents the Algorithm)
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To: Screamname

A few Freepers probably have that photo hanging right next to their Lincoln desktop statues.


16 posted on 06/07/2007 4:04:07 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: SF Republican

Did you catch the Chamberlain speech at Fredericksburg in Gods and Generals? I thought they overdid it- too much drama.


17 posted on 06/07/2007 4:05:56 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: martin_fierro

Someone told me once that when they had those pics taken back then, the photographer would tell them to hold their breath so they didn`t move, and he would mention “cheese” as cheese smelled bad. I always thought saying “cheese” was meant to make people look like they were smiling, but you look at those old pics from the 1800`s, it does look like they are holding their breath doesn`t it? Lincolns mouth for example is always closed, he looks like he is holding his breath.


18 posted on 06/07/2007 4:07:08 PM PDT by Screamname (On this date in history; Al Gore invents the Algorithm)
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To: stainlessbanner; Travis McGee

lol...you bad!

I got Bedford on my wall....Travis can attest to that!


19 posted on 06/07/2007 4:07:14 PM PDT by wardaddy (on parole)
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To: stainlessbanner

That`s not a bad idea. I used to have a color printer and I wouldn`t mind printing that out and framing it. The first time I saw that pic it just absolutely blew me away.

And just think; all those pics we take today with digital cameras will look exactly the same, just as clear as they do now 100, 200 even 2000 years from now. All those digital camcorders, if saved right, people 1000 years from now can look at them and they will look like they were taken minutes ago.

Can you imagine if that kind of tech existed back in the time of Lincoln, Washington even Christ? You could pop in a DVD and watch Lincoln giving a speech and it would look like it was taken seconds ago. We are living in an age now where we are at the cusp of that kind of tech but will never live to see the kind of effect it will have on people a few hundred years from now. But I guess people back 200, 300 years from us said the same about paintings and photographs. Who knows, 200 years in the future digital photos and videos will seem “old”. They`ll probably have 3d interactive photos or something. That`s if people are still around by then. It all depends who wins the election in `08. Duncan Hunter, we will continue..Hellary, all bets are off.


20 posted on 06/07/2007 4:22:54 PM PDT by Screamname (On this date in history; Al Gore invents the Algorithm)
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To: InvisibleChurch

There was also a military inability to “finish off” enemy armies, caused by up to date technology tied to tactics and strategies from the War of 1812 and the Mexican War. The only time an army of either side was “finished off” was Hood’s Army of Tennessee, at Nashville, at the hands of George Thomas. And that was late 1864.


21 posted on 06/07/2007 4:27:59 PM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: gorush

Disagree. If Lee had stopped attacking after Day 2, history still would have been different, and he wouldn’t have lost a whole bunch of casualties on Day 3.

And besides, the war was basically lost when Grant took Vicksburg - the next day [July 4th]


22 posted on 06/07/2007 4:32:01 PM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: stainlessbanner

I agree it was a bit dreamy. I did enjoy that book for its laying out of the events closing the war, I had not realized how down-to-no-options the South and General Lee were.


23 posted on 06/07/2007 4:53:34 PM PDT by SF Republican
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To: Screamname

He was UGLY.


24 posted on 06/07/2007 4:54:01 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: sono

The Union was pretty good at blowing opportunities in general until Grant and that later generation of Union commanders (Sherman, Sheridan, etc.) got on the scene.

I’m not really a scholar of the WBTS, but I’ve never quite understood how the South had such a large number of solid (or even brilliant) officers at the start of the War, and the Union generalship was so profoundly awful in comparison for the first two years. Then the trends crossed, and as the Union generalship improved throughout the second half of the War, the Confederates couldn’t replace those invaluable men like Stonewall Jackson.

}:-)4


25 posted on 06/07/2007 5:24:45 PM PDT by Moose4 (Just junk all across the horizon, a real highwayman's farewell...)
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To: stainlessbanner

Well I’ve got a portrait of Jackson, Lee, and Forrest in my house and one each of Jackson and Lee on my office wall. Now where is that little statue someone gave me of the 16th President......oh yes it holds the toilet paper in the bathroom..


26 posted on 06/07/2007 5:28:42 PM PDT by billbears (Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it. --Santayana)
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To: billbears

May I borrow Five Dollars?


27 posted on 06/07/2007 5:35:22 PM PDT by sono (Note to W: Pardon Scooter NOW!)
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To: PzLdr
It is all conjecture, but... Lee made an uncharacteristically large number of errors at Gettysburg, and JEB Stuart’s tardiness also contributed to the loss. If Lee had taken the high ground immediately upon arriving he would have won the battle and Day 3 would never have occurred, the fact that he didn’t allowed the 20th Maine their heroic stand. Had Lee won at Gettysburg the will of the North would have been broken as it was teetering on the brink at the time. It would have overshadowed Vicksburg and Lincoln would have lost his remaining support.

Maybe our Constitution would still mean what it says...and maybe not... John Adams packed the federal courts after his loss to Jefferson but before his term was up. One of his liberal appointees was Marbury of Marbury v. Madison, possibly the greatest cause of our Constitution's demise. Once again, just conjecture.

28 posted on 06/07/2007 5:38:16 PM PDT by gorush (Exterminate the Moops!)
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To: sono

Actually I rarely carry money anymore. It’s easier to use a debit/credit card and very few places don’t take them. But when I did, I rarely used a 5 and didn’t take pennies in change.


29 posted on 06/07/2007 5:40:45 PM PDT by billbears (Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it. --Santayana)
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To: martin_fierro

Were these pictures taken before or after he was shot?


30 posted on 06/07/2007 5:52:54 PM PDT by Silly (http://www.paulklenk.us)
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To: stainlessbanner

Thanks for ping SB


31 posted on 06/07/2007 5:59:11 PM PDT by StoneWall Brigade
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To: Freedom4US

He really was NOT very attractive.

In our day of tv and Internet, I doubt that he would be elected. Unfortunately, many people now care about the exterior more than the interior.

(That colorized picture is amazing—it makes him more “real.” I do wonder, however, why he didn’t comb his hair.)


32 posted on 06/07/2007 6:12:06 PM PDT by bannie
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To: gorush
That darn Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine changed the course of history by narrowly defeating the rebels on little round top...if not for that, the South could have gone on to win the whole shootin’ match...and maybe remnants of our long since deceased Constitution would still remain. Before then, people said the United States are...now they say The United States is...

Since a lot of things have occurred the past century to upset the Founders' original plan, it's natural to suppose that things would have been different if the rebs had won. But the Confederate States of America was no champion of limited government. That is, unless you were a slaveowner. The day that engine of oppression, the CSA, was destroyed was the best day the South ever had.

33 posted on 06/07/2007 6:14:22 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Freedom4US
Damn right he was ugly...You ever see the mirror image of that pic? He looks like a crackhead in a suit..This is what he saw everytime he looked in the mirror.

He truly is the epitome of "Never judge a book by it`s cover." Einstein was the same way about his looks. The sad part is today we live in an incredibly superficial society where someone like Lincoln wouldn`t make it to manager of a porta-san never mind POTUS which is why we constantly get these metrosexual, marketing directed, generic accent talking, dunces as our "leaders".

The focus on looks today is sickening. Take the Paris Hilton crap. Never in a million years did I ever think this absolute waste of humanity would ever take precedent over our own brave men and women in Iraq, but it happened. Why? Because of her looks. And just think; The people who put her on this pedestal are the same people who the government qualifies as a "jury of your peers". Good initiative to never get into legal trouble, ever! These same jelly brained morons who freed OJ would just as soon throw an innocent into jail for life. Why? Because they`re as easy to manipulate as cockroaches to shiet. This is why I`ll never believe in the death penalty, no way. How many more example do we need of people in prison for 10, 20 years ultimtely freed due to DNA evidence? Is there anything more evil than executing a man for a crime he didn`t commit? Sure there are obvious cases like a John Wayne Gacy, but shiet like that don`t care if they die. Why? Beause their effin` nuts. Torture is much better. 23 hours a day in a cement cell for the rest of their lives. No books, no TV, no nothing.

34 posted on 06/07/2007 6:34:53 PM PDT by Screamname (On this date in history; Al Gore invents the Algorithm)
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To: Screamname
He just needs some botox and clean up.
35 posted on 06/07/2007 7:02:26 PM PDT by CJ Wolf
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To: Don Corleone
Well at least there is one piece of Presidential correspondence Sandy Burgler didn't’t liberate.

I was going to say, how do we know that Sandy Berger didn't accidently destroy a memo from George Washington discussing the tactics of British General Clinton, mistaking it for a criticism of President Clinton.

-PJ

36 posted on 06/07/2007 7:10:40 PM PDT by Political Junkie Too (It's still not safe to vote Democrat.)
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To: Screamname

Fair enough - I probably shouldn’t have said that, because doctors likely say he had some sort of condition that caused his features to change a bit, but he definitely has cornered the “rode hard and put away wet”. It sure does look a lot like bed hair. Who goes to a portrait from Matthew Brady? without spiffying up a little?


37 posted on 06/07/2007 7:14:41 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: wardaddy

38 posted on 06/07/2007 7:22:25 PM PDT by Travis McGee (--- www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com ---)
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To: Travis McGee

bttt


39 posted on 06/07/2007 8:06:45 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: billbears
Actually I rarely carry money anymore. It’s easier to use a debit/credit card and very few places don’t take them. But when I did, I rarely used a 5 and didn’t take pennies in change.

I accept all fives and pennies. My SCV camp is collecting them to fund restoration of several original Confederate battleflags. Why not put 'em to good use?

40 posted on 06/07/2007 10:56:31 PM PDT by Texas Mulerider
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To: Freedom4US

Actually, that picture was taken at Alexander Gardner’s studio. Gardner was a former associate of Brady’s, though Gardner had more of an artist’s background. Most of the photos attributed to Brady were taken by Gardner. Brady was more a business man than a photographer.
These pix are great. When I was young, it was these very pictures of Lincoln and the Civil War that got me interested in photography. To me, every photograph is a historical document.


41 posted on 06/07/2007 11:29:37 PM PDT by Paisan
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To: SF Republican
[Major]General Meade

I'm not sure that's right, Meade was at the front. If I recall correctly from Bruce Catton's Glory Road, Meade was the recipient of the telegraphed version, suggesting that the original had written version was not addressed to Meade, but to the overall commander in Washington for transmission to Meade and other subordinate commanders. That commander in Washington was "Old Brains" - MG Henry W. Halleck. It would be just like Halleck to simply pass the buck on to Meade.

42 posted on 06/08/2007 7:24:19 AM PDT by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo Arabiam Esse Delendam -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit)
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To: CatoRenasci; SF Republican

BTW, Halleck was stationed in California during the Mexican War, and was one of the principal authors of the original California Constitution. He left the Army in the mid-1850s to practice law in San Francisco (Halleck St. is named for him) and was the owner of substantial property up in Marin (Rancho Nicasio - there’s still a hamlet by that name and the Nicasio Dam out near Red Hill Road which connects Petaluma to the Coast around Tomales Bay - perhaps you’ve spent some time there - as a teenager, I used to ride my bike out to the coast on that road, making a circuit that took me up past Bodega Bay and in through Graton and Sebastopol....)


43 posted on 06/08/2007 7:43:05 AM PDT by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo Arabiam Esse Delendam -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit)
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To: Texas Mulerider
someone "near to me" is stamping every "fiver" with the following message in RED ink:

WAR CRIMINAL.

free dixie,sw

44 posted on 06/08/2007 8:01:06 AM PDT by stand watie ("Resistance to tyrants is OBEDIENCE to God." - T. Jefferson, 1804)
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To: CatoRenasci
There is a pre Civil War bar here in San Francisco I frequented in my single days called The Saloon. I liked to fantasize that a number of those Gentlemen may have frequented the place. It was a rather unique place, they had a urinal along the bar (until 1972) that provided the opportunity to never need to leave your bar stool.
45 posted on 06/08/2007 8:11:21 AM PDT by SF Republican
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To: SF Republican
I don't remember The Saloon, but I used to eat frequently at the Tadich Grill when I was a kid. IIRC, the Tadich dates to 1849 or so. My father's family didn't arrive in California until the early 1850s, and I'm only a 5th generation Californian, but the place was a favorite of my greatgrandfather (who was a friend of AP Giannini), my grandfather and my father. I miss the old San Francisco before the homosexuals and leftists took over; the old house in Pacific Heights, visiting shops with my grandfather who seemed to know everyone, and running around the Presidio. Are you a native?
46 posted on 06/08/2007 8:29:15 AM PDT by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo Arabiam Esse Delendam -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit)
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To: CatoRenasci
Tadich is still a wonderful spot, great food, good service, too packed! I was 5th generation Texas but got a little tired of the 100 degree summers. When I went to boot camp in San Diego I decided then and there that when I was done, I was moving to San Diego. Lived on the beach in La Jolla about 10 years and finally got bored but always enjoyed visiting up here. Moved here in ‘91, we live out in the outer Sunset close enough to hear the waves at night. I now consider 80 degrees to be pretty warm.
47 posted on 06/08/2007 8:41:36 AM PDT by SF Republican
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To: SF Republican
we live out in the outer Sunset close enough to hear the waves at night. I now consider 80 degrees to be pretty warm.

It was Mark Twain who said The coldest winter I ever spent was a Summer in San Francisco, who undoubtedly had experience of those 35 degree fogs rolling in around 5:30 pm and not lifting until noon (downtown, and perhaps not at all out in the far Richmond and Sunset). One of the funniest things in the great Summer of Love (1967) was all the kids who'd come from all over the country in summer clothes, with light fiberfill sleeping bags or cotton blankets enjoying a sunny afternoon in Golden Gate Park, being totally frozen and bewildered as the usual July blanket of fog rolled in.... having a nice warm place was as good as having plenty of dope and a good pick-up line.....

48 posted on 06/08/2007 8:52:00 AM PDT by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo Arabiam Esse Delendam -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit)
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Though Gen. George Meade led the Northern troops in the battle at Gettysburg that marked the turning point of the war, he has always been faulted for not closing in and destroying Lee's army.
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
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49 posted on 06/08/2007 8:53:24 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated May 31, 2007.)
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To: CatoRenasci
having a nice warm place was as good as having plenty of dope and a good pick-up line..... - LOL - That's the truth. Sometimes when I dream of getting out of the insurance business I think that a sweatshirt concessionaire at the end of the Powell St Cable-car in North Beach was a good bet.
50 posted on 06/08/2007 9:00:57 AM PDT by SF Republican
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